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Physician Assistant B.S./M.S.

A student practicing her Physician Assistant skills.

Physician Assistant, B.S./M.S.

Overview

Combined B.S./M.S. P.A. Curriculum

The physician assistant department offers a 4 1/2 year combined B.S./M.S. degree. All students admitted to the department are expected to complete at least the last three years of the curriculum through full-time studies at D’Youville College. Students who successfully complete all curriculum requirements will be awarded a B.S./M.S. in physician assistant studies, and will be eligible to sit for the Physician Assistant National Certification Examination, developed and administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

The physician assistant department has been approved and registered by the New York State Education Department, and is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA).

Within the B.S./M.S. curriculum, the first two years (Phase I) are devoted to the study of the arts, humanities and sciences, which satisfy general education core requirements of the college’s baccalaureate degree and other prerequisite requirements specified by the departmental curriculum. The third year, begins the professional phase of study (Phase II), and prepares students with a broad, comprehensive base in clinical medicine, pharmacology, physical diagnosis, clinical laboratory medicine, behavioral and preventive medicine. The professional phase also allows students to develop interpersonal, communication and critical-thinking skills, which are essential to facilitate effective and empathetic relationships with patients and effective collaboration with other health care professionals. The fourth year of the curriculum allows the student to apply and refine his/her critical thinking and clinical skills while working under the guidance and supervision of clinical preceptors. During the clinical and graduate years, students will complete ten mandatory clinical rotations and the choice of two elective clinical rotations. The students also complete a research project during this phase.

Courses

Course Requirements

Physician Assistant
Degree: B.S./M.S.

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PA 303

Clinical Medicine I

This course is a comprehensive study of diseases with emphasis on etiology, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, critical review of medical literature, preventive care and therapeutic measures involved in treating medical problems. Topics will be presented through demonstrations, discussions and clinical conferences as well as lectures by physicians, physician assistants and other appropriate health professionals. This course will include discrete blocks on major organ systems and special populations. It is closely integrated with the pharmacology, clinical skills and physical diagnosis courses.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-307 BIO-339, PA-335 PA-309 PA-312

5
PA 304

Clinical Medicine II

Continuation of Clinical Medicine I.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-303, PA-336 PA-311 PA-313 PA-310

5
PA 305

Behavioral Medicine

This course focuses on understanding human behavior in health and illness. Health, illness and sick role behaviors, psychosocial factors in the etiology of illness, patient compliance with prescribed therapeutic regimens, use of health behavior models in patient education, health maintenance, and disease prevention and sexuality will be discussed.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

2
PA 309

Clinical Laboratory Medicine I

This course explores common laboratory procedures employed in the evaluation of disease processes. Students develop proficiency in understanding such routine procedures as a CBC, urinalysis, gram stains and cultures. Students develop skills in interpreting clinical laboratory values in relation to disease, therapy and prognosis.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-208 CHE-102, PA-303 PA-335 PA-312

2
PA 310

Clinical Laboratory Medicine II

This course is a continuance of PA 309.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-309, PA-304 PA-336 PA-313 PA-311

2
PA 311

Clinical Skills

Proper methods of performing various clinical procedures such as intravenous catheter insertion, intramuscular injections, passing nasogastric tubes, applying casts and drawing blood will be covered in this course.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: BIO-208 BIO-240, PA-304 PA-310 PA-312 PA-336

3
PA 312

Physical Diagnosis I

Most of the course is devoted to the development of physical examination skills and the art of developing a rapport with patients. By the end of the course, students will have received instruction and training in basic communication skills and how to conduct a medical interview, as well as training in techniques of physical diagnosis. The course includes the use of simulated patients, as well as a range of field experiences to provide direct contact with patients and practicing physicians. This allows students to interact with patients and to integrate knowledge and skills in the setting of clinical interactions
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-339, PA-303 PA-309 PA-312 PA-335

2
PA 313

Physical Diagnosis II

This course is a continuation of PA 312.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-312

2
PA 335

Pharmacology

This course includes topics such as pharmacotherapeutics, drug absorption, distribution and metabolism and drug interactions. The course is closely integrated with the clinical medicine course. All major systems of the body are covered in relation to drugs and diseases.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-107 BIO-108 BIO-303, PA-303 PA-309 PA-312

3
PA 336

Pharmacology II

This course is a continuation of Pharmacology I. The course explores clinical pharmacology and medical therapeutics, including disease states and their medical management.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-335, PA-304 PA-310 PA-311 PA-315

3
PA 401B

Internal Medicine

Over a four-week period, the course provides the foundation for clinical evaluation and treatment. Training may occur in inpatient internal medicine in hospitals or outpatient internal medicine. The rotation will expose the student to adult populations and their medical problems. The student will learn clinical presentation of general medical problems, evaluation, therapeutic intervention and methods of documentation.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 401C

Family Medicine

This course is presented on a four-week rotation and exposes students to patients from all age groups, from pediatrics to geriatrics. Students will learn the clinical presentation of general medical problems, evaluation, therapeutic intervention and methods of documentation in a family practice setting.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 402

General Surgery

During the four-week general surgery rotation, students will learn management of surgical patients in the hospital and in ambulatory settings including presentation and workup of common surgical problems, as well as surgical interventions, and in-hospital care of the pre-and postoperative patient.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 403

General Pediatrics

This six-week rotation provides the opportunity to assess medical problems that require both inpatient and outpatient management of children. Students will get practical clinical experience in the outpatient setting managing routine childhood illnesses and health maintenance, and with the medical team in the hospital at the time of delivery assessing, the newborn and caring for children with more severe medical problems. Documentation in the medical record will augment skills previously acquired for data collection. Students will come to understand the influence that family interactions can have on the course of the patient’s development, wellbeing and illness.

Prequisites: None

5
PA 404

Obstetrics and Gynecology

OB/GYN is a four-week rotation with the purpose of providing practical clinical experience for the evaluation and treatment of women. Experience will be gained in the areas of general women's health; family planning, pre-, intra- and postpartum care; as well as routine gynecologic care for sexually transmitted diseases, dysmenorrhagia and menopausal health. Students will come to understand the effects that sexual activity, childbearing and menopause have on a woman's psychological, social and medical well-being.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 405

Psychiatry

The purpose of the four-week psychiatry rotation is to provide the student with clinical experience in the varied presentations of mental illness. The student will have an opportunity to evaluate, identify and learn management of both acute and non-acute psychiatric patients.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 406

Emergency Medicine

Emergency medicine is a four-week rotation with the purpose of providing practical clinical experience in the care of acute medical emergencies. Students will develop an understanding of the concept of triage in an emergency situation where care is provided to the development of physical examination skills, and the art of developing rapport with patients. By the end of the course, students will have received instruction and training in basic communication skills and how to conduct a medical interview, as well as future care.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 407

Geriatrics

The two-week course will take place in a freestanding, long-term care facility or inpatient skilled nursing facility and provide students with experience addressing the special needs of this patient population. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all third-year courses.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 408

Orthopaedics

The four-week orthopedics rotation will give students the opportunity to observe treatment of common musculoskeletal complaints. The rotation will combine clinical experience in an ambulatory practice setting with following orthopedic patients in the hospital.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 500

Professional Issues

This course provides a historical perspective of the physician assistant profession, as well as content related to current trends and issues. The course will include discussion of the importance of professional responsibility in the health care role, as well as information on professional organizations, graduate certification and re-certification,employment considerations, professional liability and prescriptive authority.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 501

Elective Clinical Rotation I

Elective Clinical Rotation 1 offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to explore subspecialty area of medicine not covered in the current curriculum, spend more clinical time in primary care, or work with a physician that has been identified as a potential employer. Open to physician assistant students only.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 502

Elective Clinical Rotation II

Elective Clinical Rotation II offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to explore subspecialty areas of medicine not covered in the current curriculum, spend more clinical time in primary care, or work with a physician that has been identified as a potential employer.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 503

Primary Medicine Core Practicum

Primary care, an eight-week rotation provides the opportunity to refine the foundation in clinical evaluation and treatment and to establish patient education and community education skills. This will occur in a setting, which provides continuity of patient care and the opportunity to establish an ongoing preceptor/P.A. relationship. Training occurs over an eight-week period at a single clinical site. Open to physician assistant students only.

Prequisites: None

6
PA 504

Graduate Seminar I

Graduate Seminar I offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to receive instruction in professional practice, community service, patient education, medical malpractice legislation,recognizing an impaired medical provider and other issues pertinent to their development as health care professionals. The students will also have an opportunity to participate in clinical enrichment lectures and workshops, focusing on particular issues pertaining to medical management of the critically ill inpatient.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 505

Graduate Seminar II

Graduate Seminar II offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to receive instruction in areas of professional practice, to receive additional enrichment in areas of particular clinical interest to the student,and to address other issues pertinent to their development as health care professionals.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 603

Applied Research Methods

This course will introduce the graduate-level PA student to concepts of critical thinking related to scientific research. The course will emphasize the rigors involved in completing the research project required as part of the master's degree portion of the PA degree. In this course, the student will be introduced to quantitative, qualitative and survey methods of research, students will be instructed on critical review of the medical literature from peer-reviewed journals. A review of creative writing and concepts in performing literature searches is provided. The framework for completion of the subsequent phases of the research project(Applied Project Seminar I & II)will be introduced during Research Methods. Finally, the PA student will choose their research topic.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 604

Applied Project Seminar I

During this course, the student completes the first phase of the research project:the research proposal. The PA student is guided through the sequence of developing the research project,completing an outline of objectives for the project and creating a clear vision of the importance of the original project. During the second phase of the course,the student completes a literature review applicable to the research topic. The third phase involves developing the materials and methods and then applying for approval of the project though the Institutional Review Board (IRB)at D'Youville. The PA student can then proceed to completion of the project in Applied Project Seminar II (APSII).

Prequisites: None

3
PA 605

Applied Project Seminar II

During this course the PA graduate student will complete their research project. During the last six months of their training, the PA student will collect data or complete surveys based upon the research method pertaining to their project. The student is guided at interpretation of the data,presentation of the data in the results and conclusions from the data. The student then defends their project with a poster presentation at the end of their training.

Prequisites: None

3
PA

Two Electives from PA 509, PA 511, PA 512 or PA 606

Choose two electives from PA 509, PA 511, PA 512, or PA 606
6

In other academic areas required for this major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L and BIO-107R

3
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107

1
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-108

1
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO-107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: Bio-208

0
*BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will takeBIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6
*BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or(CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or bea chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3
*BIO 307

Pathophysiology

This is a study of disease processes as disturbances of the body's homeostasis. The body's defense mechanisms and their breakdown are emphasized. Various clinical assessment methods are discussed. The course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107,BIO-107L BIO-108,BIO-108L (CHE-111,CHE-112) or (CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102CHE-102L)Chiropractic students can take BIO-507L BIO-508L BIO-659BIO-660

3
BIO 639L

Gross Anat Lab

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply, and functions in movements. Additional dissections involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity.

Prequisites: None

0
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: High school chemistry or CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prequisites: CHE-101

1
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prequisites: CHE-101,CHE-101L, CHE-102L

3
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prequisites: CHE-102

1
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prequisites: CHE-219

1
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course fromPHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L

4
PHI 214

Challenges of Death

This course examines the ways that death challenges human meaning and action. Topics include the meaning of suffering and death, challenges of death to morality, psychological spiritual processes of dying and bereavement are considered.

Prequisites: None

3
PHI 312

Bioethics Seminar

This course analyzes ethical dilemmas and problems posed by developments in the biosciences. Problems discussed include choices for life or death, allocation of resources, human experimentation, reproductive technologies and professional-client relationships.

Prequisites: PHI-201 or PHI/RS-214

3
PSY 203

Developmental Psychology

This course explores milestones of physical,cognitive and psychosocial development from conception through old age. Emphasis is placed on global principles that guide human growth and change across the lifespan. The course meets the core requirement in psychology.

Prequisites: None

3
HSM 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prequisites: None

1

Major: 86
Major Requirements in other academic areas: 50
Remaining core requirements: 39

Total (B.S/M.S): 175

* Courses must be taken at D'Youville College. No transfer credit will be given for courses completed over 18 months prior to the beginning of professional phase courses.

Curriculum

Curriculum Sequence

4 1/2 Year BS/MS Degree Curriculum-First & Second Year

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L and BIO-107R

3
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107

1
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: High school chemistry or CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prequisites: CHE-101

1
ENG 111

Introduction to Literature: Acad Writing

This course is an introduction to literature and the fundamentals of academic writing. Students learn the skills essential to college success:critical reading and analytical thinking, interpretation, scholarly discussion and collaboration, effective oral presentation, composition of writing for both readers and listeners.

Prequisites: None

3
CSC 110

Computers and Computing

This is an introduction to the fundamental ideas of computers and their implementation: office applications (word processor, spread sheet, presentation and database), elementary website design, blogging, Internet use for research (hardware, software, early pioneers of the computing industry, common terminology, etc.) and some elementary programming. Instructors may include other appropriate topics. Both Windows and MAC OS will be utilized. (Not open to those with credit in CSC 151.)

Prequisites: None

3
**PSY 203

Developmental Psychology

This course explores milestones of physical,cognitive and psychosocial development from conception through old age. Emphasis is placed on global principles that guide human growth and change across the lifespan. The course meets the core requirement in psychology.

Prequisites: None

3
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-108

1
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prequisites: CHE-101,CHE-101L, CHE-102L

3
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prequisites: CHE-102

1
ENG 112

Liberal Arts Seminar: Research Writing

This course teaches academic research skills and writing based on a liberal arts topic. Topics vary by instructor.

Prequisites: None

3
**MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course fromPHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L

4
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prequisites: CHE-219

1
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO-107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: Bio-208

0
HSM 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prequisites: None

1
*BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or(CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or bea chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3
*BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will takeBIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6
BIO 639L

Gross Anat Lab

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply, and functions in movements. Additional dissections involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity.

Prequisites: None

0
**PHI 214

Challenges of Death

This course examines the ways that death challenges human meaning and action. Topics include the meaning of suffering and death, challenges of death to morality, psychological spiritual processes of dying and bereavement are considered.

Prequisites: None

3
**PHI 312

Bioethics Seminar

This course analyzes ethical dilemmas and problems posed by developments in the biosciences. Problems discussed include choices for life or death, allocation of resources, human experimentation, reproductive technologies and professional-client relationships.

Prequisites: PHI-201 or PHI/RS-214

3
*BIO 307

Pathophysiology

This is a study of disease processes as disturbances of the body's homeostasis. The body's defense mechanisms and their breakdown are emphasized. Various clinical assessment methods are discussed. The course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107,BIO-107L BIO-108,BIO-108L (CHE-111,CHE-112) or (CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102CHE-102L)Chiropractic students can take BIO-507L BIO-508L BIO-659BIO-660

3

Total Credits: 59



Select one of the following:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PHI 201

Ethics in Theory & Action

This course is an examination of human conduct and responsibility and the relationships between individuals and society.

Prequisites: None

3
RS 201

Religion & Social Responsibility

The nature and principles of religious ethics in the Judeo-Christian tradition are explored with an emphasis on historical and contemporary attitudes of religion towards social responsibility. Topics for discussion include: sexuality,identity,power,violence,war,racism and medical ethics.

Prequisites: None

3

Total Credits: 6

One course in Sociology: 3
Three courses in Humanities: 9
One course in PSC/ECO: 3
One course in HIS: 3
Three electives: 9
Core requirements subtotal: 89

*Courses must be taken at D'Youville College. No transfer credit will be given for courses completed over 18 months prior to the beginning of professional phase courses.

** Fulfills departmental curriculum requirements and core requirements.

Didactic Year Requirements - Third Year

Course Number Course Name Credits
PA 303

Clinical Medicine I

This course is a comprehensive study of diseases with emphasis on etiology, pathophysiology, signs and symptoms, diagnostic procedures, critical review of medical literature, preventive care and therapeutic measures involved in treating medical problems. Topics will be presented through demonstrations, discussions and clinical conferences as well as lectures by physicians, physician assistants and other appropriate health professionals. This course will include discrete blocks on major organ systems and special populations. It is closely integrated with the pharmacology, clinical skills and physical diagnosis courses.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-307 BIO-339, PA-335 PA-309 PA-312

5
PA 305

Behavioral Medicine

This course focuses on understanding human behavior in health and illness. Health, illness and sick role behaviors, psychosocial factors in the etiology of illness, patient compliance with prescribed therapeutic regimens, use of health behavior models in patient education, health maintenance, and disease prevention and sexuality will be discussed.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

2
PA 309

Clinical Laboratory Medicine I

This course explores common laboratory procedures employed in the evaluation of disease processes. Students develop proficiency in understanding such routine procedures as a CBC, urinalysis, gram stains and cultures. Students develop skills in interpreting clinical laboratory values in relation to disease, therapy and prognosis.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-208 CHE-102, PA-303 PA-335 PA-312

2
PA 311

Clinical Skills

Proper methods of performing various clinical procedures such as intravenous catheter insertion, intramuscular injections, passing nasogastric tubes, applying casts and drawing blood will be covered in this course.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: BIO-208 BIO-240, PA-304 PA-310 PA-312 PA-336

3
PA 312

Physical Diagnosis I

Most of the course is devoted to the development of physical examination skills and the art of developing a rapport with patients. By the end of the course, students will have received instruction and training in basic communication skills and how to conduct a medical interview, as well as training in techniques of physical diagnosis. The course includes the use of simulated patients, as well as a range of field experiences to provide direct contact with patients and practicing physicians. This allows students to interact with patients and to integrate knowledge and skills in the setting of clinical interactions
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-339, PA-303 PA-309 PA-312 PA-335

2
PA 312L

Physical Diag Lab



Prequisites: None

0
PA 335

Pharmacology

This course includes topics such as pharmacotherapeutics, drug absorption, distribution and metabolism and drug interactions. The course is closely integrated with the clinical medicine course. All major systems of the body are covered in relation to drugs and diseases.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-107 BIO-108 BIO-303, PA-303 PA-309 PA-312

3
PA 304

Clinical Medicine II

Continuation of Clinical Medicine I.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-303, PA-336 PA-311 PA-313 PA-310

5
PA 310

Clinical Laboratory Medicine II

This course is a continuance of PA 309.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-309, PA-304 PA-336 PA-313 PA-311

2
PA 313

Physical Diagnosis II

This course is a continuation of PA 312.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-312

2
PA 313L

Physical Diagnosis Lab



Prequisites: None

0
PA 336

Pharmacology II

This course is a continuation of Pharmacology I. The course explores clinical pharmacology and medical therapeutics, including disease states and their medical management.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: PA-335, PA-304 PA-310 PA-311 PA-315

3

Didactic Year Subtotal: 29

Clinical Year Requirements- Fourth Year

Course Number Course Name Credits
PA 401B

Internal Medicine

Over a four-week period, the course provides the foundation for clinical evaluation and treatment. Training may occur in inpatient internal medicine in hospitals or outpatient internal medicine. The rotation will expose the student to adult populations and their medical problems. The student will learn clinical presentation of general medical problems, evaluation, therapeutic intervention and methods of documentation.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 401C

Family Medicine

This course is presented on a four-week rotation and exposes students to patients from all age groups, from pediatrics to geriatrics. Students will learn the clinical presentation of general medical problems, evaluation, therapeutic intervention and methods of documentation in a family practice setting.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 402

General Surgery

During the four-week general surgery rotation, students will learn management of surgical patients in the hospital and in ambulatory settings including presentation and workup of common surgical problems, as well as surgical interventions, and in-hospital care of the pre-and postoperative patient.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 403

General Pediatrics

This six-week rotation provides the opportunity to assess medical problems that require both inpatient and outpatient management of children. Students will get practical clinical experience in the outpatient setting managing routine childhood illnesses and health maintenance, and with the medical team in the hospital at the time of delivery assessing, the newborn and caring for children with more severe medical problems. Documentation in the medical record will augment skills previously acquired for data collection. Students will come to understand the influence that family interactions can have on the course of the patient’s development, wellbeing and illness.

Prequisites: None

5
PA 404

Obstetrics and Gynecology

OB/GYN is a four-week rotation with the purpose of providing practical clinical experience for the evaluation and treatment of women. Experience will be gained in the areas of general women's health; family planning, pre-, intra- and postpartum care; as well as routine gynecologic care for sexually transmitted diseases, dysmenorrhagia and menopausal health. Students will come to understand the effects that sexual activity, childbearing and menopause have on a woman's psychological, social and medical well-being.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 405

Psychiatry

The purpose of the four-week psychiatry rotation is to provide the student with clinical experience in the varied presentations of mental illness. The student will have an opportunity to evaluate, identify and learn management of both acute and non-acute psychiatric patients.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 406

Emergency Medicine

Emergency medicine is a four-week rotation with the purpose of providing practical clinical experience in the care of acute medical emergencies. Students will develop an understanding of the concept of triage in an emergency situation where care is provided to the development of physical examination skills, and the art of developing rapport with patients. By the end of the course, students will have received instruction and training in basic communication skills and how to conduct a medical interview, as well as future care.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 407

Geriatrics

The two-week course will take place in a freestanding, long-term care facility or inpatient skilled nursing facility and provide students with experience addressing the special needs of this patient population. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all third-year courses.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 408

Orthopaedics

The four-week orthopedics rotation will give students the opportunity to observe treatment of common musculoskeletal complaints. The rotation will combine clinical experience in an ambulatory practice setting with following orthopedic patients in the hospital.

Prequisites: None

3

Clinical Year Subtotal: 27

Graduate Year-Final Six Months

Course Number Course Name Credits
PA 500

Professional Issues

This course provides a historical perspective of the physician assistant profession, as well as content related to current trends and issues. The course will include discussion of the importance of professional responsibility in the health care role, as well as information on professional organizations, graduate certification and re-certification,employment considerations, professional liability and prescriptive authority.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 501

Elective Clinical Rotation I

Elective Clinical Rotation 1 offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to explore subspecialty area of medicine not covered in the current curriculum, spend more clinical time in primary care, or work with a physician that has been identified as a potential employer. Open to physician assistant students only.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 502

Elective Clinical Rotation II

Elective Clinical Rotation II offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to explore subspecialty areas of medicine not covered in the current curriculum, spend more clinical time in primary care, or work with a physician that has been identified as a potential employer.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 503

Primary Medicine Core Practicum

Primary care, an eight-week rotation provides the opportunity to refine the foundation in clinical evaluation and treatment and to establish patient education and community education skills. This will occur in a setting, which provides continuity of patient care and the opportunity to establish an ongoing preceptor/P.A. relationship. Training occurs over an eight-week period at a single clinical site. Open to physician assistant students only.

Prequisites: None

6
PA 504

Graduate Seminar I

Graduate Seminar I offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to receive instruction in professional practice, community service, patient education, medical malpractice legislation,recognizing an impaired medical provider and other issues pertinent to their development as health care professionals. The students will also have an opportunity to participate in clinical enrichment lectures and workshops, focusing on particular issues pertaining to medical management of the critically ill inpatient.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 505

Graduate Seminar II

Graduate Seminar II offers an opportunity for physician assistant students to receive instruction in areas of professional practice, to receive additional enrichment in areas of particular clinical interest to the student,and to address other issues pertinent to their development as health care professionals.

Prequisites: None

1
PA 603

Applied Research Methods

This course will introduce the graduate-level PA student to concepts of critical thinking related to scientific research. The course will emphasize the rigors involved in completing the research project required as part of the master's degree portion of the PA degree. In this course, the student will be introduced to quantitative, qualitative and survey methods of research, students will be instructed on critical review of the medical literature from peer-reviewed journals. A review of creative writing and concepts in performing literature searches is provided. The framework for completion of the subsequent phases of the research project(Applied Project Seminar I & II)will be introduced during Research Methods. Finally, the PA student will choose their research topic.

Prequisites: None

3
PA 604

Applied Project Seminar I

During this course, the student completes the first phase of the research project:the research proposal. The PA student is guided through the sequence of developing the research project,completing an outline of objectives for the project and creating a clear vision of the importance of the original project. During the second phase of the course,the student completes a literature review applicable to the research topic. The third phase involves developing the materials and methods and then applying for approval of the project though the Institutional Review Board (IRB)at D'Youville. The PA student can then proceed to completion of the project in Applied Project Seminar II (APSII).

Prequisites: None

3
PA 605

Applied Project Seminar II

During this course the PA graduate student will complete their research project. During the last six months of their training, the PA student will collect data or complete surveys based upon the research method pertaining to their project. The student is guided at interpretation of the data,presentation of the data in the results and conclusions from the data. The student then defends their project with a poster presentation at the end of their training.

Prequisites: None

3

Select two of the following:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PA

Two Electives from PA 509, PA 511, PA 512 or PA 606

Choose two electives from PA 509, PA 511, PA 512, or PA 606
6

Graduate Subtotal: 30

Total of B.S./M.S. Degree: 175

Courses PHI 214 can be replaced by RS 214 and PHI 312 can be replaced by RS 312.

Requirements

Admissions Criteria B.S./M.S.

For the 4 1/2-year B.S./M.S. track, traditional freshmen will be admitted directly into the freshman year, and transfer students may be admitted directly into the program at any point in Phase I of the curriculum. Class placement for transfer students will be dependent on successful completion of prerequisites and competitive availability of class seats. Once accepted into the department, students are expected to complete all preprofessional requirements at D'Youville. The following preprofessional courses must be taken at D’Youville College: BIO 303 Biochemistry, BIO 339 Human Gross Anatomy, and BIO 307 Pathophysiology. If a transfer student has satisfactorily completed these specific courses with an earned grade of B- or better at another institution within 18 months prior to program entry, the course content will be reviewed by the department chair and Registrar to determine transferability. Qualified applicants are determined, via web-based application materials and personal interview, on the basis of several criteria: ability to master the rigorous academic content of the program, verbal and written communication skills, emotional maturity, and understanding of and motivation to enter the profession.

*All students (traditional freshman and transfer) must show evidence of a minimum of 80 hours of direct patient interaction to be considered for admission.

Minimum Admission Academic Requirements

Traditional freshman students applying for admission to the 4 1/2-year B.S./M.S. track must meet or exceed each of the following criteria:

  • A combined RSAT score of at least 1,170
  • Rank in at least the upper fourth of his/her graduating class
  • A class average of at least 85 percent
  • Three years of math, one year of chemistry and one year of biology. A grade of at least 83 percent must have been achieved in each course.

Transfer students applying to the B.S./M.S. program must meet or exceed each of the following:

  • An undergraduate overall G.P.A. of at least a 3.0 on a 4.0 scale; 3.0 undergraduate science G.P.A. required;
  • A grade of at least B- in all college science courses and other college courses required by the department;
  • Students will be required to repeat science courses taken more than six years prior to matriculation into the department.
  • Applications must be submitted and verified by CASPA by October 2. Please be aware that verification of applications can take up to four weeks.

To be considered for an interview, all applicants must accrue and provide official documentation of at least 80 hours of direct patient interaction either through volunteer or employment activities. Applications without this documentation will not be considered for an interview.

Application process

All students are accepted on a competitive space-available basis, based upon the above criteria. Maximum accreditation size limit is 40 students per cohort.

Following review of the written application materials, a pool of applicants are selected for a formal interview. Not all applicants satisfying minimum admission requirements will be selected for an interview. Interviews are scheduled between October and January. All materials must be received by the office of admissions by October 2 for transfer applicants and November 1 for traditional freshman applicants. Placements are made on a competitive, space available basis. Incomplete applications will not be reviewed. Candidates must also submit an essay and three references, as specified on the PA department website.

Regulations

Student Responsibilities

The physician assistant department is a demanding program in coursework, time commitment and financial obligations. Students enrolled in the PA department must complete four summer sessions in addition to the nine regular full-time semesters, for a total of 175-credit hours. Clinical rotations will require additional expenses for travel and room and board. All students are responsible for their own transportation to and from clinical rotations, and extended daily travel distances may be required. It is required that each student have a valid driver’s license and his or her own vehicle. Due to the time commitment of the program, particularly in Phase II and III, off-campus work is not recommended.

Students are required to be a member of the D'Youville College Student Physician Assistant Association.

Academic Regulations

The 4 1/2-year B.S./M.S. curriculum is composed of three phases, which extend across five years. Phase I, the pre-professional phase, includes the first two years of study, which is comprised of the prerequisites and core curriculum. Phase II is the third and fourth year, which is the professional phase, and includes the didactic preparation for practice and clinical rotations. Phase III is the graduate level curriculum. Each phase of the program is considered a prerequisite to the next phase and must be satisfactorily completed prior to advancement. In addition to general college policies and regulations, which apply to all students, academic regulations of the physician assistant department are applicable to both full- and part-time students. They include the following:

PROGRAM CONTENTS AND REQUIREMENTS 4 1/2-YEAR B.S./M.S.

  1. The physician assistant curriculum is demanding in coursework, time, commitment and financial obligations. Students enrolled in the 4 1/2-year B.S./M.S. curriculum must complete four summer sessions in addition to the nine regular full-time semesters. Clinical rotations will require additional expenses for travel and room and board. Due to the time commitment to the program, particularly in Phase II and Phase III of the curriculum, off-campus work is not recommended.
  2. As noted above, the physician assistant curriculum is composed of three distinct academic phases. Each phase of the program is considered a prerequisite to the next phase and must be satisfactorily completed prior to advancement.
  3. Student Conduct: Students enrolled in the D’Youville College physician assistant department are expected to demonstrate high standards of personal behavior and professional conduct in all academic and clinical environments. Dishonesty or misconduct, whether academic or professional, in any form will not be tolerated. College policy regarding academic dishonesty will be followed with the recommendation that the offender be dismissed from the physician assistant department. Professional misconduct will be reviewed by the progress committee and may result in probation and/or dismissal from the department. Unprofessional behavior in the clinical setting will result in failure of the rotation regardless of course mastery and may result in immediate dismissal from the department.

Other specific requirements include the following:

Phase I: Good Academic Standing
  1. Once students are matriculated and enrolled in the first two years of the curriculum, they must maintain a cumulative science grade point average (G.P.A.) of at least 3.00.
  2. Once students are matriculated and enrolled in the first two years of the curriculum, they must maintain an overall semester and cumulative grade point average (G.P.A.) of at least 3.00.
  3. A minimum grade of a B- for all science courses (C for all other coursework) specified as a Phase I prerequisite in the curriculum plan is required. However, students must be aware of the 3.0 minimum semester and cumulative G.P.A. requirements and 3.0 minimum cumulative science G.P.A.
Phase I: Academic Probation
  1. If the student fails to achieve a 3.00 (semester and cumulative) overall and science G.P.A. (cumulative), they will be placed on probation, will be required to retake courses at D'Youville in which they did not meet the minimum, and may also be decelerated. These are the minimum grade standards of all PA department curricular requirements.
  2. If a student fails to achieve these standards in any department required course, they will be placed on probation.
  3. Students who do not meet academic requirements for two science course requirements in the same semester will be automatically decelerated into the next graduating class, and at the very least, placed on probation.
  4. A student will be placed on academic probation when there is a failure to satisfy specific departmental academic standards or regulations. The period of probation extends until completion of the two full-time semesters immediately following conferral of probation status and includes any coursework completed during summer term while on probation.
  5. Academic deficiencies that result in departmental academic probation must be corrected within the two full-time semesters that immediately follow the date of probation.
  6. Probationary students on a decelerated or part-time schedule must continue to meet all conditions of the probation while on a part-time schedule and will remain on probation until the completion of their next two full-time semesters.
Phase I: Dismissal
  1. Failure to meet the conditions of probation will result in dismissal from the department.
  2. To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, the student must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.
  3. Dishonesty or misconduct, whether academic or professional in any form, will not be tolerated. College policy regarding academic dishonesty will be followed with the recommendation that the offender be dismissed from the physician assistant department.
Phase II: Good Academic Standing
  1. A minimum grade of B- (80 percent) is required for all courses included during the didactic year of curriculum (Phase II) with the exceptions of PA 311 Clinical Skills, and PA 305 Behavioral Medicine in which the minimum passing grade is 73 percent.
  2. Students are required to obtain permission of the department faculty prior to registration in clinical rotations included in Phase II of the program.
  3. All 400-level clinical rotations must be completed with a minimum grade of C (73 percent). All 500-level clinical rotations must be completed with a minimum grade of B (83 percent). Formal or informal remediation may be required prior to returning to the clinical experiences. All clinical rotations must be completed within 21 months of completion of didactic academic coursework or repetition of academic courses may be required.
  4. A student must possess current certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR), child abuse recognition certification, HIPAA and New York State in-servicing on bloodborne pathogens, prior to matriculation into the clinical phase of the program. All students in the clinical and graduate phase will be required to have professional liability insurance specified by the program.  Students must also have evidence of vaccinations/ immunizations and annual history and physical examinations in compliance with CDC recommendations for health care professionals.
Phase II: Academic Probation
  1. Students who fail to obtain the required grades in any Phase II course during the didactic year will not be permitted to progress in the professional curriculum without review by the progress committee, which may entail probation, deceleration and possible remediation. Students may be permitted to decelerate and repeat 300-level courses on a case-by case basis, depending on their past academic history and next available class seat. Any department-required course may be repeated only once. Students who must repeat a 300-level course will be required to repeat and demonstrate continued proficiency in any or all other 300-level courses prior to enrollment in 400-level courses.
  2. Despite meeting minimum academic standards, permission to progress into the clinical year may be denied on the basis of demonstrated weakness or inability to meet the program academic and/or professional standards.
  3. Students who do not meet these minimum criteria in any 400- or 500-level clinical rotation course, or who voluntarily withdraw from the clinical rotation, must receive formal approval by the faculty to repeat that course or to continue with subsequent rotations. A student will not be allowed to repeat more than one 400- or 500-level clinical course required in the major.
Phase II: Dismissal
  1. Second failure of the same 300-level course will result in automatic dismissal from the physician assistant department. Any student who fails more than one 300-level course in the same semester will be automatically dismissed from the department.
  2. Failure of a second 400- or 500-level course will result in dismissal from the department.
  3. To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, the student must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.
  4. Dishonesty or misconduct, whether academic or professional in any form, will not be tolerated. College policy regarding academic dishonesty will be followed with the recommendation that the offender be dismissed from the physician assistant department.
Phase III: Good Academic Standing
  1. During the graduate year of study in the 4 1/2-year B.S./M.S. degree program, as a requirement of the primary care rotation, all senior level students must satisfactorily complete a community service project with a corresponding poster presentation as outlined in the clinical phase student manual.
  2. A minimum passing grade for all graduate-level courses will be a B (83 percent). Achieving and maintaining a minimum G.P.A. of 3.0 is a requirement for completion of the graduate year.
  3. All master's degree candidates must satisfactorily complete a research project with a corresponding presentation. This project must have prior approval of the department and the IRB and be overseen by a faculty advisor.
Phase III: Academic Probation
  1. If a students fails to obtain the minimum passing grade for any course in the graduate phase of the curriculum, the student will be placed on academic probation. Failure to meet the conditions of probation will result in dismissal from the department.
  2. To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, the student must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.
  3. Dishonesty or misconduct, whether academic or professional in any form, will not be tolerated. College policy regarding academic dishonesty will be followed with the recommendation that the offender be dismissed from the physician assistant department.
Phase III: Dismissal
  1. Failure to meet the academic standards or conditions of probation will result in dismissal from the department.
  2. Failure to meet the conditions of probation will result in dismissal from the department.
  3. Professional misconduct will be reviewed by the progress committee and may result in dismissal from the department. Unprofessional behavior in the clinical setting will result in failure of the rotation regardless of course mastery and may result in immediate dismissal from the department.
  4. To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, the student must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.
  5. Dishonesty or misconduct, whether academic or professional in any form, will not be tolerated. College policy regarding academic dishonesty will be followed with the recommendation that the offender be dismissed from the physician assistant department.

Appeals

To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, you must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.

Department

Physician Assistant Department

The physician assistant department offers a 4 1/2 year combined B.S./M.S. degree. Graduates are eligible for the Physician Assistant National Certification Examination developed and administered by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

The physician assistant department has been approved and registered by the New York State Education Department and is accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA). Students in the PA department are trained to serve a variety of patient populations with sensitivity and compassion, with an emphasis on primary care and integrative medicine.