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Physical Therapy (D.P.T.)

Students practicing hearing exercises.

Physical Therapy, D.P.T.

Overview

Doctoral Program

The graduate entry-level doctor of physical therapy (D.P.T.) program is offered to applicants who have completed a bachelor’s degree and undergraduate prerequisites required by the physical therapy department. The graduate professional program is also offered as part of a sequential-degree program to D’Youville College undergraduate students, where students can choose a pathway through the departments of health services, biology in math and natural sciences or exercise and sports studies. The three-year graduate D.P.T. program is registered with the New York State Education Department (NYSED) and fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) of the American Physical Therapy Association:

Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia 22314

Telephone: 703-706-3245
E-mail: accreditation@apta.org
Website: www.capteonline.org

The D.P.T. curriculum involves 108 credit hours and includes traditional college coursework, distance learning, and clinical fieldwork affiliations. Coursework in the doctoral program begins in the summer semester of the first year of graduate study and runs through nine consecutive semesters to typically be completed by May of the third year. D’Youville’s unique 36-month doctoral professional program is organized as 12-month curricula, allowing students to enter practice in a minimum of time. D’Youville’s physical therapy program offers quality clinical fieldwork experiences at a choice of more than 300 clinical sites.

 The physical therapy program is a demanding program in coursework, time commitment and financial obligations. Students enrolled in the professional program must complete three full-time summer sessions in addition to the six full semesters of coursework in the three-year doctoral program. Clinical fieldwork, which is scheduled throughout the curriculum, may require an additional expense for travel and room and board. Physical therapy students also incur an additional expense for laboratory fees. Successful performance on a comprehensive exam is required for graduation from this program. A few students in the physical therapy program may seek employment as work-study students on campus. Due to the time commitment to the program, part time off-campus work during the program is not recommended.

Courses

Course Requirements

Physical Therapy Degree: Doctor of Physical Therapy
Degree: D.P.T.

Course Requirements for the Professional Phase

In the specific area of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 639

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply, and functions in movements. Additional dissections involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity.

Prequisites: BIO-639L, (BIO-507L BIO-508L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108BIO-108L) or (BIO-317 BIO-317L) or (BIO-517 BIO-517L) orequivalent.

6
BIO 639L

Gross Anat Lab

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply, and functions in movements. Additional dissections involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity.

Prequisites: None

0
GRA 601

Research Methodology and Design

This course reviews and critically analyzes components of research design, including collection of data. Emphasis is placed on the professional as producer and consumer of research.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 500

Basic Skills I

This course introduces the student to clinical skills essential for practice entry. Students will receive instruction in evaluation skills including manual assessment of muscle strength, joint mobility, vital signs, perceived exertion, transfer training, gait training, use of assistive devices and functional examination including upper and lower quadrant screening. Related concepts include professional communication (verbal and non-verbal); documentation; and patient, family and community education. Format: lecture, discussion, group and individual presentations, with possible fieldwork.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 500L

Basic Skills I Lab

This course introduces the student to clinical skills essential for practice entry. This course presents basic examination, evaluation skills and intervention strategies for management of patients with emphasis on subacute level of care. Students will receive instruction in examination skills including evaluation of muscle strength, joint mobility, vital signs, perceived exertion, transfer training, gait assessment and training, and functional examination including upper and lower quadrant screening. Lab experiences include skill development in goniometric, manual muscle testing, vital signs, perceived exertion, positioning, draping, transfer and gait training and wheelchair measurement and mobility. Fieldwork experiences may be included.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 502

Pathophysiology for Physical Therapists

Knowledge of the pathology of disease has always stood as one of the fundamental prerequisites to safe and effective health care practice. This course is an introduction to the basic principles of human pathology with emphasis on disease processes and their pathophysiology, etiology, and signs and symptoms. This course will familiarize the student with how the systems of the body function and malfunction in disease with regard to healing, inflammation, infection, immune response, and neoplasia. Most importantly, you will learn the implications of these pathologic conditions on the physical therapist.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 503

Clinical Orientation Seminar I

This administrative course is presented in a seminar format and is essential for the planning and management of the Clinical Education portion of the physical therapy curriculum. Policies and procedures will be reviewed as will the Clinical Education Manual. Topics of relevance to the clinical education portion of the program will be discussed. Clinical site selection for Clinical Fieldwork I (PT 574) and Clinical Fieldwork II (PT 674) will take place during this course.

Prequisites: None

0
PT 504

Clinical Orientation Seminar II

This administrative course is presented in a seminar format and is essential for the administration of the Clinical Education portion of the physical therapy curriculum. Policies and procedures for clinical education will be reviewed. Topics of relevance to the clinical education portion of the program will be discussed. APTA Clinical Performance Instrument will be introduced. Preparation for clinical fieldwork in PT 574 and the clinical selection process for PT 574 and PT 674 will occur in this class.

Prequisites: None

0
PT 505

Intro Pt and Health Care Systems

This course introduces the student to knowledge essential for practice entry. Discussion topics include health care systems (dominant and world models), definition of the health care professional in general, and specifically the P.T., including the scope of practice, the APTA, Standards of Practice, the Practice Guide, and Code of Ethics. Class discussions are an important part of this class.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 506

Physiology of Therapeutic Exercise

This is the didactic portion of PT 506. The contemporary physical therapist utilizes exercise as a therapeutic agent in the clinical management of a variety of pathological conditions. The student requires a firm and comprehensive foundation in current exercise-related knowledge and concepts which provide the scientific bases for rational evaluation of relevant physiological parameters in patients, and for the design, monitoring and modification of specific exercise training procedures devised for dysfunctional conditions. The major objective of this course is to introduce the physiological bases for exercise. The emphasis will be on the study of normal human movement. The latest scientific and theoretical information will be examined. The course includes didactic and small group experiences.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 506L

Physiology of Therapeutic Exercise Lab

This is the laboratory component of PT 506. The contemporary physical therapist utilizes exercise as a therapeutic agent in the clinical management of a variety of pathological conditions. The student requires a firm and comprehensive foundation in current exercise-related knowledge and concepts which provide the scientific bases for rational evaluation of relevant physiological parameters in patients, and for the design, monitoring and modification of specific exercise training procedures devised for dysfunctional conditions. The major objective of this course is to introduce the physiological bases for exercise. The emphasis will be on the study of normal human movement. The latest scientific and theoretical information will be examined. The course involves laboratory experiences.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 510

Basic Skills II

This course, in conjunction with knowledge and skills acquired in Basic Skills I, introduces clinical skills essential for practice entry. Practice competencies will include but are not limited to integumentary assessment (e.g. wound care), the therapeutic use of electro-modalities, massage, edema control, and functional exercise. Demonstration of competency in basic clinical skills emphasizes maintaining a safe and therapeutic environment, professional communication and behaviors, and effective client education. Format: lecture and small group tutorial.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 510L

Basic Skills II Lab

Practice competencies will include but are not limited to the therapeutic use of electro-modalities, massage, wound management, edema control, and functional activity assessments. Demonstration of competency in basic clinical skills emphasizes maintaining a safe and therapeutic environment, professional communication and behaviors, and effective client education. Format: lab and field observations.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 513

Orthopedic Physical Therapy I

The course is designed to develop student skills in the areas of musculoskeletal examination,evaluation and intervention for patients with dysfunction of the spine and/or its related structures. Competencies to be acquired include the ability to effectively: .Identify physical examination procedures related to various spinal abnormalities. .Evaluates examination findings in order to appropriate categorize patients into movement based classification systems and when necessary identify a pathoanatomic diagnosis. .Develop a comprehensive plan of care for client management based on, patient intervention strategies presented will include but are not limited to instruction in techniques for patient education, referral/consultation, manual therapy(thrust and non-thrust manipulation, soft tissue manipulation, muscle energy techniques). Exercise prescription, spinal traction, and indications for use of modalities/physical agents. An understanding of the functional anatomy of spinal structures will be emphasized as they relate to patient management in orthopedics.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 513L

Orthopedic I Lab

This course presents examination,evaluation and intervention strategies for management of clients presenting with musculoskeletal dysfunction of the spine and its related structures. The emphasis of this laboratory is on the development of clinical hands on skills for the effective and efficient performance of client examination, evaluation and interventional strategies as well as the synthesis of examination finding in the implementation of a plan of care. Lab experiences include skill development in specialized manual orthopedic approaches (thrust & non-thrust manipulation). Therapeutic exercise, patient case management, and problem solving techniques founded on evidence-based practice. An emphasis is placed on case-based instruction.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 514

Integumentary Examination & Intervention

This course will provide an in depth examination of the integumentary system including wound healing and risk factors associated with pathology to the integumentary system. Physical therapy examination techniques and interventions are included.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 515

Professional Development I

This course examines the development of effective communication skills that are essential for effective patient/practitioner interaction. Along with verbal and non-verbal skills, this course facilitates self-awareness, multicultural awareness, and awareness of current professional issues as they apply to PT practice, the management of health care, and medico-legal concerns.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 518

Biomechanics and Kinesiology for Pt

This is the didactic portion of PT 518. The contemporary physical therapist plays a major role in prevention, evaluation and clinical management of motion dysfunctions associated with developmental disorders and other forms of pathology. Students require a comprehensive understanding of basic biomechanical and kinesological principles as a foundation for analytical investigation of movement-related conditions. Fundamental concepts are progressively integrated with and applied to total body function through laboratory analysis of human posture and complex body motions. Included in this course will be an overview to the science of human movement study. Basic mechanics, biomechanics, kinematics and kinetics will be examined. Kinesiology of normal joints, posture, head, neck and trunk movement will be emphasized. The normal kinesiological aspects of specific joints and movement patterns will be analyzed. Included will be a detailed examination of normal human walking gait as well as pathological gait patterns. This course included lecture experiences.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 518L

Biomechanics and Kinesiology Lab

This is the laboratory portion of PT 518, The contemporary physical therapist plays a major role in prevention, evaluation and clinical management of motion dysfunctions associated with developmental disorders and other forms of pathology. Students require a comprehensive understanding of basic biomechanical and kinesiological principles as a foundation for analytical investigation of movement-related conditions. The course is organized to illustrate general principles of structure and function that can be applied in subsequent study of individual joint complexes. Fundamental concepts are progressively integrated with and applied to total body function through laboratory analysis of human posture and complex body motions. Included in this course will be an overview to the science of human movement study. Basic mechanics, biomechanics,kinematics, kinetics and functional anatomy will be examined. Kinesiology of normal joints,posture, head, neck and trunk movements will be emphasized. Both normal and pathological movement patterns will be analyzed. Included will be a detailed examination of normal human walking gait as well as pathological gait patterns. This courseutilizes experiences.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 519

Lifespan Development

This course examines physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of normal infancy through adolescent human development.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 519L

Lifespan Development Lab

This laboratory section provides the foundation for the understanding of normal development from birth through adolescents. This lab will encompass the assessment of developmental reflexes, righting and equilibrium responses, stages of motor control and fundamental movement patterns. Laboratory experiences include skill development in specialized testing techniques and observation of normal development.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 520

Lifespan Development II

This course examines physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of normal human development from adolescence through end of life as they relate to physical therapy practice. Patient management for prevention, health promotion, fitness and health risks related to aging will be explored.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 520L

Lifespan Development II Lab

This laboratory section provides the foundation for the understanding of functional testing in the field of Geriatrics and experience interactions with individuals in the later stages of life. Laboratory experiences include skill development in specialized testing techniques and observation of and communication with elderly individuals.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 522

Functional Anatomy

This is the didactic portion of PT 512. The physical therapist must have a strong understanding of human anatomy and its relationship to both normal functional movement as well as dysfunction of the neuromusculoskeletal system in order to effectively examine, evaluate, and provide interventions for their clients in a clinical practice setting. This course is organized to build upon the knowledge students acquired in BIO 639: Human Gross Anatomy through a region by region detailed analysis of specific anatomic structures and their function as relates to clinical physical therapy practice. Basic mechanics, biomechanics, kinematics, kinetics and functional anatomy of the spine and its related structures as well as the extremities will be examined. Students will be introduced to normal imaging on plane film x-ray, MRI and CT.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 522L

Functional Anatomy Lab

This is the laboratory component PT 512. The contemporary physical therapist requires advanced skills for the palpation and identification of specific anatomic structures related to the examination, evaluation and application of interventions for the clinical management of clients with neuromusculoskeletal dysfunction. This course is designed to build upon knowledge acquired in BIO 639: Human Gross Anatomy by further developing the students' ability to perform both superficial and deep palpation of selected anatomic structures related to clinical practice in physical therapy. Students are also introduced to basic neuromusculoskeletal examination procedures and their clinical application and interpretation as relates to functional anatomy and normal human movement and structure.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 547

Pharmacology for Rehabilitation Spec

This course explores trends in pharmacological management of acute and chronic conditions related to rehabilitative sciences including physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy and related disciplines. Content addresses action, interactions, precautions and side effects of drug interventions in the rehabilitative management of patient/ clients.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 550

Clinical Neuroscience

An in depth study of the neuroscience of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Clinical conditions and case studies in neurology will be utilized. Laboratory includes examination of neural specimens. Four lecture hours and three laboratory hours.

Prequisites: None

5
PT 550L

Clinical Neuroscience Lab



Prequisites: None

0
PT 552

Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy

This course covers principles and techniques of cardiac and pulmonary intervention. Laboratory experience includes cardiopulmonary assessment, exercise testing and prescription.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 552L

Cardiopulmonary Lab

This course includes principles and techniques of cardiac and pulmonary intervention. Laboratory experience includes cardiopulmonary assessment, exercise testing.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 552S

Cardiopulmonary Seminar

Students work in small groups to address questions addressing prepared cases integrating the areas of cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physical therapy. Expert clinicians review student responses and offer feedback and comment via web-based communication. Note: This course offering is in modular form delivered as distance learning in conjunction with PT 552 Lecture.

Prequisites: None

0
PT 574

Clinical Fieldwork I

This is the first full-time clinical fieldwork. Its purpose is to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate and apply academic knowledge and clinical skills in a fieldwork experience. Students are provided a supervised clinical experience requiring case management through problem evaluation, goal setting, and therapeutic intervention. The preferred setting is a general hospital or rehabilitation setting that provides a continuum of patient care - (6 weeks, full time fieldwork).

Prequisites: None

3
PT 602

Neurodevelopmental Pediatrics

This course provides the foundation for physical therapy examination and treatment of individuals with emphasis on neurodevelopment and developmental disabilities in the pediatric population. This course explores the examination, evaluation and intervention strategies for the patient with movement dysfunction as a result of neurodevelopmental pathology. Concepts include: family dynamics, multi-setting interventions, advocacy and consultation. Identification of environmental risks will be explored.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 602L

Neurodevelopmental Pediatrics Lab

This laboratory section provides the foundation for performance of the physical therapy examination and treatment of individuals with emphasis on neurodevelopmental and other chronic disabling conditions in a pediatric population. This lab will encompass examination, evaluation, and intervention for the patient with neurodevelopmental system pathology. Laboratory experiences include skill development in specialized techniques, patient case management and problem solving techniques.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 604

Clinical Orientation Seminar III

This seminar covers the administration of the clinical portion of the PT curriculum. The class will have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss the clinical experience and the Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) as well as the new CPI web-based tool that is used as the evaluation tool by their clinical instructors. The development of the clinical instructor is introduced. Selection of the third clinical fieldwork placement (PT 675) will occur. Clinical professional preparation for the fieldwork experiences (PT 674 and 675) will also be included in this administrative course.

Prequisites: None

0
PT 606

Neuromuscular Assessment

This course provides the foundation for physical therapy examination and treatment of individuals with emphasis on neuromuscular and other chronic disabling conditions in an adult population. This course explores the examination, evaluation, and intervention strategies for the patient with movement dysfunction as a result of neuromuscular system pathology. Concepts include the following: theory and evidence based intervention strategies, patient education, multi-disciplinary care, family dynamics, multi-setting interventions, and consultation.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 606L

Neuromuscular Assessment Lab

This laboratory section provides the foundation for performance of the physical therapy examination and treatment of individuals with emphasis on neuromuscular and other chronic disabling conditions in an adult population. This lab will encompass examination, evaluation, and intervention for the patient with neuromuscular system pathology. Laboratory experience includes cranial nerve testing, neuromuscular therapeutic handling techniques, and therapeutic exercise prescription for a neurologic patient population.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 613

Orthopaedic Physical Therapy II

The course is designed to develop student skills in the areas of musculoskeletal examination, evaluation and intervention for patients with dysfunction of the extremities and their related structures. Competencies to be acquired include the ability to effectively plan all components of the physical examination, evaluate examination findings, develop a functional and medical diagnosis when appropriate, and identify appropriate interventions necessary to address patient impairments, functional limitations and disabilities. Intervention strategies presented will include manual therapy, exercise prescription, and modalities/ physical agents. An understanding of the functional anatomy of peripheral structures will be emphasized as they relate to patient management in orthopedics

Prequisites: None

2
PT 613L

Orthopedic II Lab

This course is designed to develop student skills in the areas of clinical examination/ evaluation and intervention for the comprehensive management of individuals with musculoskeletal dysfunction related to pain syndromes, post-operative diagnoses, and degenerative processes. Lab experiences include instruction in problem solving strategies and hands-on assessment and treatment techniques as well as the development and implementation of specific exercise programs.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 614

Community Health & Wellness

The course will cover concepts of prevention, health, wellness, health promotion and education in physical therapy practice. Analysis of personal health behaviors and the role of physical therapists in promotion and planning of personal and community health programs, and population health initiatives will also be included. Content includes models of health promotion, health beliefs, needs assessment, health screening, and community health planning/ implementation/evaluation. Application of prevention and wellness strategies within the scope of physical therapy practice is explored. Goals of the World Health Organization and Health People 2020 will be examined as they related to health and wellness, particularly physical activity and nutrition.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 615

Professional Development II

This course builds on knowledge and development of effective clinical communication skills that were established in PT 515. Along with advancement of clinical verbal and non-verbal skills development,this course facilitates increased awareness and sensitivity of multicultural issues as well as discussion of how current professional issues influence PT practice, delivery and management of health care.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 618

Rehabilitation II

This course discusses the physical therapy patient/client management of adult individuals with neuromuscular disorders throughout the continuum of care. Related pathologies include peripheral vascular disease, amputations, rheumatoid arthritis, post-polio syndrome, vestibular dysfunction, spinal cord injury, and chronic progressive disorders of the nervous system and integumentary system. PT intervention/prescription of prosthetic/orthotic devices for adults will also be examined. Emphasis will be placed on the PT roles of educator, advocate and consultant in various rehabilitation settings including subacute/long-term care and the home. Case management topics include rehabilitation of clients with multiple medical, cognitive and/or social problems, and long-term management of selected neuromuscular and integumentary disorders.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 618L

Rehabilitation Lab II

This course allows application of the physical therapy patient/client management of adult individuals with neuromuscular disorders throughout the continuum of care. Related pathologies include, peripheral vascular disease, amputations, rheumatoid arthritis, post-polio syndrome, and spinal cord injury and chronic progressive disorders of the nervous system and integumentary system. Emphasis is placed on developing and implementing examinations and treatment interventions appropriate to PT management.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 627

Application of Research Methods in Pt

This course prepares students to critically analyze and apply theory and scientific evidence to clinical practice. Students synthesize related theory and published research to present a rationale for evidence-based physical therapist practice. Course activities include lectures and seminars (both small group and computer-based) in which students pose clinically relevant research questions, conduct a systematic literature review and perform critical analysis of research studies. Introduction to ethical issues and protection of human subjects as part of research will be discussed. Students will prepare a mock IRB submission for a hypothetical study based on a clinically relevant research question. Students are also introduced to professional literature addressing economics analysis of outcomes. Format:lecture and seminar. Program required courses.

Prequisites: None

4
PT 627L

App of Research Methods in PT Lab



Prequisites: None

0
PT 628

Research Seminar

This seminar is conducted through small group discussions concerning critically appraised topics (CAT)required of students to complete a doctor of physical therapy degree. students will search for and appraise literature pertinent to their CAT project,explore the economic evaluation literature,as it informs reimbursement policy and clinical practice guidelines, learn the basics of grant writing as well as publically disseminate their findings.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 748

Differential Diagnosis

The content of this course is designed to prepare both physical therapy students and practicing physical therapists to function as primary care providers within the field of physical therapy. Participants in this course will learn to identify key indicators of systemic pathology in order to assist in the development of a differential diagnosis and thus identify the necessity of direct physical therapy intervention or the need for referral to other health care providers. Participants will also be introduced to the basic skills necessary to identify the indications forradiographic and hematological testing as well as the clinical interpretation of data obtained from these tests.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 674

Fieldwork II

This is the second full-time clinical fieldwork. Its purpose is to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate and apply academic knowledge and clinical skills in a fieldwork experience. Students are provided a supervised clinical experience requiring case management through problem evaluation, goal setting, and therapeutic intervention. The preferred setting is a facility that provides a continuum of patient care in differing venues.

Prequisites: None

4
PT 675

Clinical Fieldwork III

This is the third clinical fieldwork. Its purpose is to continue to provide the student with the opportunity to integrate and apply academic knowledge and clinical skills in a fieldwork experience. Students are provided a supervised clinical experience requiring case management through problem evaluation, goal setting, and therapeutic intervention. The preferred setting is a facility that provides a continuum of patient care in differing venues.

Prequisites: None

4
PT 701

Clin Decision in Theory Exercise

This course will develop the theoretical basis and clinical application of therapeutic exercise commonly used by physical therapists.Specific course content will include indications, precautions and contraindications and principles and procedures for applying various types of therepeutic exercise interventions. Clinical reasoning, evidence based practice,and independent learning will be fostered through traditional lectures, group discussions and group presentations. Students will be required to apply and integrate knowledge learned from any preceding physical therapy coursework and clinical fieldwork experiences. Critical analysis of clinical scenarios will be incorporated into course.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 701L

Clin Decision in Ther Exer Lab

The course is the lab component of PT 701 which will offer clinical application of therapeutic exercise commonly used by physical therapists. Specific coure content will include indications precautions and contraindications and principles and procedures for applying various types of therapeutic exercise interventions. Clinical reasoning, evidence based practice,and independent learning will be fostered through lab,seminar and group discussions. Students will be required to apply and integrate knowledge learned from any preceding physical therapy coursework and clinical fieldwork experiences. Critical analysis of clinical scenarios will be incorporated into course.

Prequisites: None

1
PT 703

Education Advocacy Consultation

This seminar course is designed to advance client educator skills and explore advocacy and consultative roles within the context of rehabilitative science. Once students have knowledge of the applied theory and concepts related to these roles, they present and peer-review applications of this knowledge. Format: hybrid – on campus seminars and community based activities.

Prequisites: None

3
PT 709

Business Management Strategies forPhysical Therapists

This course will introduce relevant health care business management concepts and tools along with the most current legislative issues affecting physical therapy practice in the United States. Students will develop a basic foundation for business management strategies and professional issues needed in order to lead clinical operations of physical therapy in a variety of healthcare settings including the demand for both clinical and business excellence in the future of the physical therapy profession.

Prequisites: None

2
PT 725

Clinical Fieldwork IV

This is the fourth of four clinical fieldwork experiences in the D.P.T. program. Its purpose is to provide the student with(a) the opportunity to integrate and apply academic knowledge and clinical skills in a fieldwork experience in either an area of clinical practice that is new to the student or one that provides learning opportunities to advance previous learning achievement, and (b) to pursue an individual learning plan. Students are provided a supervised clinical experience requiring case management through problem evaluation, goal setting and therapeutic intervention, as well as the opportunity to explore management and administrative roles of the physical therapist. The preferred setting is a facility that provides a continuum of patient care in a venue related to the student's individual professional development plan.

Prequisites: None

5
PT 799

NPTE Examination Preparation

This administrative course assists student in self-assessment of learning with preparation and practice to take the National Physical Therapy Examination upon graduation from the program. The NPTE is a 200 question, 4 hour computer-based examination which summatively evaluates a graduate's safety and competency to be licensed in the profession. This course provides the framework for one practice attempt simulating the 200-question, computer-based exam needed for licensure serving as a formative self-assessment from which each student will develop an individualized study/review plan facilitated by selected review sessions monitored by program faculty based on the analyses of the pre-test.

Prequisites: None

0
PT-XXX

One Graduate Elective/Practicum/Study

Choose one Graduate Elective, Practicum or Directed Study.
5
Total credits: 108
Requirements

Graduate Application Process

Applicants to the doctor of physical therapy (D.P.T.) must submit a graduate application through the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) online at www.ptcas.org. The deadline for applications is December 1st for acceptance into the next cohort beginning in the summer semester.

Graduate admissions counselors initially conduct application review. Once an application file is complete, then transcript/ course review is conducted by designated P.T. department core faculty to determine equivalency of course content with specified undergraduate prerequisites for acceptance into the professional program.

Regulations

Academic And Professional Regulations For The D.P.T. Program

In addition to the general academic regulations, all matriculating students in the graduate D.P.T. physical therapy program must complete 108 credit hours as required. Additional academic regulations of the physical therapy program, which are applicable to both full-time and part-time students, include the following:

  1. A minimum grade of C is required for all Students who do not earn a C in a required course will not be permitted to enroll in any courses with a PT prefix until the course grade of C is remediated. A course must be repeated with permission of the program faculty the next time it is offered. A course may only be repeated once.
  2. Students may earn only two (2) grades of C, C+ or B- for graduate level Students who achieve a third grade below a B will be placed on academic probation and be required to submit a revised curricular plan to the PT student progress committee for retaking at least one of the courses in which a grade below a B was earned.
  3. Students who earn more than three grades below a B will be dismissed from the program.
  4. A minimum cumulative P.A. of 3.0 must be maintained throughout the program. Any student who fails to earn a G.P.A of 3.0 will immediately be placed on probation.
  5. Students are required to obtain permission of department faculty and successfully complete all course related competency exams prior to registration in clinical Permission may be denied on the basis of demonstrated weakness or inability to meet the program’s academic or professional standards.
  6. All clinical fieldwork must be completed with a satisfactory (S) Students receiving an unsatisfactory (U) grade for a clinical fieldwork must receive formal approval of program faculty to repeat the fieldwork experience.
  7. A second unsatisfactory (U) grade for a clinical fieldwork will result in dismissal from the program.
  8. All clinical fieldwork must be completed within 12 months of completion of professional academic coursework or repetition of academic courses may be required.
  9. Students must successfully pass a comprehensive examination within the deadline established by the program in order to be cleared for graduation from the PT pr The exam may be repeated one time. A second unsuccessful attempt on the comprehensive examination will result in the student petitioning the PT student progress committee for permission to make a third attempt.

Program Academic Probation

A student will be placed on program academic probation when there is a failure to satisfy specific program academic standards or regulations. A student placed on academic probation will remain on probation for two full-time semesters or its equivalent, which immediately follow the date of probation. Academic deficiencies, which resulted in program academic probation must be corrected within the two semesters immediately following the date of probation. Failure to meet the academic standards during a probationary period will result in dismissal from the program.

Student Conduct

Students enrolled in the D’Youville College physical therapy department are expected to demonstrate high standards of personal behavior and professional conduct in the academic and clinical environments. Throughout the curriculum, students are assessed on their student conduct related to a set of generic abilities adopted by the profession. Areas of generic professional behaviors include interpersonal communication, problem-solving skills and responsibility. Personal integrity is considered an essential of practice as such, this program has a policy of zero tolerance for academic dishonesty. Any student with documented areas of conduct deficiency will be reviewed by the program student progress committee. Actions related to improper student conduct may include a committee request for a student- initiated contract of conduct remediation, program probation or dismissal from the program. Failure to meet student conduct standards during a probationary period or a serious breach of student conduct standards will result in dismissal from the program.

Appeals

To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, you must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.

Admissions

Admission Requirements – Entry-Level Program Degree Candidates (D.P.T.)

Applicants to the doctor of physical therapy (D.P.T.) must submit a graduate application through the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS) online at www.ptcas.org. The graduate admissions office will evaluate on the basis of:

  1. Academic performance based on official college or university transcripts
  2. Official academic transcripts from colleges and universities attended both undergraduate and graduate levels
  3. Evidence of completion of 60 or more hours of work with a vulnerable population (e.g., children, individuals who are socio/economically disadvantaged, clinical populations, individuals with disabilities).
  4. Two letters of recommendation addressing leadership potential and the ability to work with others.
  5. Submission of Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score from GRE exam taken no greater than five years prior to application filing.
  6. Evidence of capability to succeed in a graduate program, as shown by a cumulative undergraduate P.A. of at least 3.00 (on a 4.00 system)
  7. Evidence of completion of all prerequisite courses completed with a grade of B or better with the exception that a maximum of two undergraduate course grades may be a C (C+, C, B-) or better. The applicant must also have a minimum pre-requisite P.A. of 3.20 or better.

    Prerequisite courses equivalent to the following D’Youville College courses:
    Math and Natural Sciences
    • Two 3-credit courses in human based science or applied science courses
    • One course in human anatomy with lab
    • One course in human physiology with lab — may be two courses in human anatomy with physiology with labs
    • Two courses in chemistry with labs
    • Two courses in physics with labs
    • One semester of statistics
    Social and Behavioral Sciences
    • One course in psychology

    Qualified applicants meeting all other admission requirements for acceptance in the professional program, with the exception of PT-specific undergraduate prerequisites, may be accepted into the program with matriculation pending completion of identified undergraduate coursework.

  8. International students whose language of instruction was other than English must submit a TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) score. Students must achieve a minimum score of 600 written or 250 computer-based on the TOEFL.
  9. A willingness to conform to published college and program policies.

The physical therapy department seeks to provide equal access to its educational offerings and program-sponsored events for individuals with disabilities. Resasonalbe prior notice is needed to arrange accommodations. Students are required to self identify their needs to the director of disability services.

Physical Therapy Department Technical Standards

Introduction

The Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) (Public Law 101-336) was established to empower qualified persons with disabilities to seek employment opportunities, transportation, and access to programs and services without fear of discrimination. These laws provide a framework for qualified individuals with documented disabilities to request reasonable accommodation needed to participate in an educational program.

The Physical Therapy Department at D'Youville College is prepared to make reasonable accommodations in order to allow students with disabilities an equal opportunity to participate and succeed in the academic program. An accommodation must be reasonable and may not be provided if it fundamentally alters the nature of the curriculum, including the didactic component, laboratory sessions, or supervised practice experiences, requires substantial program modification or lowering of academic standards, causes undue hardship for the College or affiliating agencies, or jeopardizes the health or safety of the student or others.

If the student feels he or she meets the requirements of the ADA and will require ADA accommodation, the disability must be supported by medical documentation prior to receiving accommodation. To receive accommodation, the student must take the responsibility to make the department aware of the need for accommodation by notifying the Physical Therapy Department chair, and the student must contact the Disability Services office at D'Youville College and complete the process required. The Disability Services office will then contact the Physical Therapy Department and reasonable accommodations will be made based on the recommendations of the disability office. Some accommodations may be the fiscal responsibility of the student.

No otherwise qualified person shall be excluded from participation, admission, or matriculation, or denied benefits solely by reason of his or her disability. The Physical Therapy Department will not discriminate against qualified individuals but will expect applicants and students to meet certain minimum academic and technical standards.

Technical Standards

The physical therapy program at D'Youville College is a rigorous program that places specific requirements and demands on enrolled students. An objective of this program is to prepare graduates to enter a variety of employment settings and to render care to a wide spectrum of individuals. The technical standards set forth by the Physical Therapy Department identify the attributes needed to establish the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to meet the standards of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) in order to achieve the educational outcomes required for initial practice in physical therapy and for lifelong learning necessary for functioning within an ever-changing health care environment and fulfill the physical therapy department mission. The mission of the physical therapy department at D'Youville College is as follows:

  • Consistent with the mission of D'Youville College, the Department of Physical Therapy develops students both academically and socially through evidence-based learning and community service.

  • Students graduate as knowledgeable professional doctors of physical therapy committed to life-long learning, leadership and service to society.

  • The DPT program prepares students with the skills to provide sound patient care, as well as offer preventive, educational, administrative, and consultative services that respect individuality in changing healthcare environments.

Full participation in the academic and supervised practice environments requires that students, with or without reasonable accommodation, possess abilities, attributes, and skills in five major areas:

  1. Sensory Processing
  2. Communication
  3. Motor/Strength/Coordination
  4. Conceptual/Integrative/Quantitative
  5. Behavioral/Social

All of these skills must be performed in a reasonable time frame required for clinical practice. Details regarding these essential abilities are found in the following paragraphs; they are not intended to be all inclusive.

Sensory Processing

Candidates and students must:

  1. have sufficient vision to be able to observe demonstrations or physical changes, such as in skin and musculature or changes in other areas of the body, in lecture, lab and clinical settings in the program
  2. have sufficient functional visual ability and processing to read printed material in both hard copy and electronic formats
  3. have sufficient functional auditory acuity and processing to comprehend multiple sounds, such as one or more persons engaged in conversational speech, and to hear timers and alarms
Communication

Candidates and students must:

  1. be able to communicate effectively and sensitively, orally, in writing, and non-verbally with peers, faculty, staff, community partners, the general public, and patients/clients, including individuals of different ages and from different cultural and social backgrounds
  2. be able to understand, read, speak, and write the English language at a level consistent with competent professional practice, using appropriate grammar, spelling, and vocabulary
Motor/Strength/Coordination

Candidates and students must:

  1. have sufficient dexterity, coordination and fine motor function to perform PT-related skills
  2. have sufficient physical strength and endurance to carry equipment and supplies, lift and transfer patients and other items (up to 50 pounds), walk, bend, and stoop while carrying items, and sit and stand for long periods of time
  3. have the capability to physically maneuver in required settings in a safe manner
  4. have the ability to access transportation to attend classes and supervised practice experiences in a timely manner
Conceptual/Integrative/Quantitative

Candidates and students must:

  1. be able to utilize all assessment parameters in order to assess the physical status of the clients and implement a plan of care to achieve optimal health (e.g., obtaining the client's history, performing physical assessments and analysis of laboratory data)
  2. have sufficient conceptual, integrative and quantitative abilities, including but not limited to measurement, calculations, reasoning, analysis, and synthesis; additionally, a student must be able to understand spatial relationships related to patient care
  3. have the ability to critically think, solve problems, and deal effectively with a variety of concrete and abstract variables in situations where limited standardization exists within reasonable time frames
  4. have the ability to analyze, conceptualize, and summarize complex relationships as ascertained from patient records, research studies, and other written reports and be able to communicate that information effectively
  5. have the ability to learn and work effectively in both independent and collaborative situations
  6. have the ability to execute multiple tasks simultaneously
Behavioral/Social

Candidates and students must:

  1. possess the emotional health required for utilization of his/her intellectual abilities
  2. be able to exercise good judgment in the prompt completion of all academic and supervised practice responsibilities
  3. have affective skills and appropriate demeanor and rapport that relate to professional education and quality patient/client care and customer relations
  4. be able to develop mature, sensitive, ethical, and effective relationships with instructors, colleagues, and patients/clients/customers
  5. have the capacity (maturity, emotional stability) to adapt to change, maintain composure, and display flexibility in the face of uncertainties and stressful situations
  6. portray attributes of professionalism that include but are not limited to honesty, integrity, caring, respect, trustworthiness, competence, and responsibility to and for their instructors, colleagues, and patients/clients/customers

Conclusion

The D'Youville College Physical Therapy Department and its sponsoring institutions will provide reasonable accommodations as needed to open the program to competitive, qualified individuals with disabilities. In doing so, however, the program and sponsoring institutions must maintain the integrity of the curriculum and preserve those elements deemed essential to the education of a physical therapist (which include the technical standards set forth above). The program and sponsoring institutions cannot compromise the health and safety of patients/clients/customers or students. It is inevitable that adherence to minimum requirements will disqualify some applicants and students, including some who have a disability. However, adherence to those requirements is necessary, as an applicant or student who is unable to meet the minimum academic and technical standards is not qualified for participation in the program or the practice of the profession.

Department

Physical Therapy Department

The physical therapy department recognizes a choice of pathways for freshman acceptance into the sequential degree entry-level physical therapy program.

  • B.S. in biology offered through the math and natural sciences department + D.P.T. program
  • B.S. in exercise and sports studies offered through the exercise and sports studies department + D.P.T. program
  • B.S. in health services offered through the health services administration department.

In this sequential-degree entry-level P.T. program, entering freshmen matriculate in and complete their B.S. degree through the respective departments. Upon completion of the B.S. degree, students who satisfy all D.P.T. admission requirements are accepted into the three year doctor of physical therapy (D.P.T.) program.

For a further description of the D.P.T. curriculum and academic requirements, please refer to the D'Youville College Graduate Catalog. Students will graduate with an entry-level doctor of physical therapy (D.P.T.) degree. The three-year graduate D.P.T. program is registered with the New York State Education Department (NYSED) and is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) of the American Physical Therapy Association:

Commission Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education
1111 North Fairfax Street
Alexandria, Virginia, 22314

Telephone: 703-716-3245
E-mail: accreditation@apta.org
Website: www.capteonline.org