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Occupational Therapy (M.S.)

Student helping the elderly by reaching to grab items.

Occupational Therapy, M.S.

Overview

Master's Program

The master of science degree in occupational therapy (OT) is an entry-level degree specifically created for people who have a B.A. or B.S. degree in another area of study and who meet the admission criteria. The degree program includes courses in occupational therapy theory and delivery systems, foundational courses in sciences (functional anatomy and neuroscience), human development, interpersonal and group skills, and medical/social conditions, and courses in intervention and research. Students are required to complete a research project involving a Critically Appraised Topic and are required to complete six months of supervised fieldwork.  The program may be completed within three academic years.

The OT program has been fully approved and registered by the New York State Education Department. The program is designed to meet or exceed the 2011 Standards for an Accredited Educational Program for the Occupational Therapist and to prepare graduates to succeed in diverse and emerging areas of practice. The program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE's telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its web address is www.acoteonline.org.

Once all requirements are completed, graduates are eligible to sit for the National Certification Exam for Occupational Therapists, administered by the National Board for the Certification of Occupational Therapists (NBCOT). A felony conviction may affect a student’s ability to sit for the NBCOT exam. After successful completion of this exam, the individual is an occupational therapist, registered (OTR). Most states, including New York, require licensure in order to practice. State licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT certification exam as well as six months of supervised fieldwork and graduation from an accredited program. The student is required to apply for licensure in the state(s) in which s/he will practice.

Courses

Course Requirements

Occupational Therapy
Degree: M.S. OT

For the Major Degree:

Course Number Course Name Credits
OT 501

Ot Process & Theoretical Foundations I

This course is an introduction to the profession of occupational therapy and the occupational therapy process. An historical perspective of the OT profession’s development and the theoretical bases, its professional ethics and regulations, and the role of the occupational therapist in society are covered. An introduction to the roles of occupational therapy personnel and how, as professionals, the code of ethics and professional credentials relate to practice, is presented. Students will be introduced to the theory, philosophy, and research that guide practice. Current and potential environments for OT practice will be discussed.

Prequisites: None

2
OT 506

Occupational Development I

This course consists of a study of normal occupational, neuromuscular, motor, sensory, perceptual, cognitive and psychosocial development from prenatal through adolescence. It includes analysis of occupation as a facilitator and marker of human development. An in-depth exploration of the occupational therapy practice framework, domain and process is provided. The lab includes observation of developmental markers and task analysis of developmentally appropriate occupations.

Prequisites: None

4
OT 509

Medical & Social Conditions I

This course provides an overview of selected medical and social conditions that affect engagement in occupation in childhood and adolescence. Topics include selected developmental, musculoskeletal, mental health conditions and disabilities, and social conditions that affect development, such as child abuse/ neglect, poverty and educational level.

Prequisites: None

2
OT 510

Medical & Social Condition II

This course provides an overview of selected medical and social conditions that affect engagement in occupation for adults and older adults. Topics include selected neurological, cardiopulmonary, medical, and psychosocial conditions and disabilities. End-of-life issues are addressed. Social conditions such as unemployment, family structure and elder abuse are discussed. The impact of environmental conditions on health is also addressed.

Prequisites: None

2
OT 512

Occupational Development II

This course includes a study of normal occupational, physical, cognitive, psychosocial and neuromuscular development from young adulthood to senescence. It emphasizes occupational choice, role performance and analysis of occupation as a facilitator and marker of human development. The lab includes analysis of developmentally appropriate occupations, application of teaching learning principles, and general safety and wellness promoting behaviors. [3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab].

Prequisites: OT-506

4
OT 513

Psychosocial Level I Fieldwork

This course is a Level I fieldwork experience that is intergral to and consistent with the sequence, depth, focus and scope of content in the curriculum design of the program. It is a part-time experience consisting of a minimum of 25 hours, which will take place in a setting that serves one or more of the various needs of individuals and requires a focus on psychological and social factors that influence engagement in occupation for individuals across the lifespan.

Prequisites: OT-514 OT-521

1
OT 514

Interpersonal Skills

This course is a study of selected interpersonal communication theories and skills that are the foundation of effective professional relationships and therapeutic use of self. It includes discussion, skill building and role playing with critiquing. [1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab].

Prequisites: None

2
OT 515

Ot Delivery Systems

This course is an examination of delivery models in which occupational therapists function. The health care system will be included, as will the educational system, the social system and the community. Examples of OT programs will be presented within each system of delivery and delivery model that affects OT practice. Traditional and non-traditional models of delivery of OT services will be described. [2 hour lecture].

Prequisites: None

2
OT 517

Group Process

This course is a study of selected group process theories and skills that are the foundation of effective group relationships, therapeutic use of self, and group leadership. This course includes discussion, skill building, and role playing with critiquing. [1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab].

Prequisites: None

2
OT 519

Functional Anatomy

This course includes a study of human anatomy with emphasis on the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. It integrates human anatomy with analysis of movement including measurement of action, movement within a task and biomechanics. The course includes lab and lecture. The lab includes gross anatomy prosections, CD-ROM, recitation and experiential kinesiology. [3 hour lecture, 4 hour lab].

Prequisites: OT-519LF and OT-519LG

5
OT 520

Clinical Neuroscience

This course is a study of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system, neurological factors underlying dysfunction and occupational therapy approaches to treatment. It integrates neuroanatomy and physiology with movement, sensation, cognition, perception and psychological function. Selected practice models addressing psychosocial, pediatric and adult physical disabilities will be studied. Course includes lecture and lab. Lab and recitation include neuroanatomy models, neurophysiology CD-ROM, recitation, guided practice on selected therapy techniques and treatment planning based on case studies. [4 hour lecture, 3 hour lab, 1 hour recitation].

Prequisites: None

5
OT 521

Fieldwork Seminar I

This seminar is designed to involve students in the analysis and preparation for professional practice, to introduce students to the fieldwork process, and to prepare them for fieldwork selection. [1hour per week].

Prequisites: None

0
OT 523

Ped & Adol Level I Fieldwork



Prequisites: OT-501 OT-509 OT-510 OT-514 OT-512 OT-520, OT-525 OT-527

1
OT 525

Ot Process and Theoretical FoundationsII

This course is an introduction to the theories, philosophies and research that guide practice in OT. Pediatric (referring to both children and adolescents) practice environments will be described and pediatric models will be studied. [2 hour seminar].

Prequisites: OT-501 OT-520

2
OT 527

OT Methods of Eval. & Doc. I

This course is an introduction to the principles and techniques of OT evaluation and documentation. The evaluation process, types of assessments, and the interpretation and documentation of evaluation data pertinent to pediatric practice will be included. [1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab].

Prequisites: OT-501 OT-509 OT-510 OT-512 OT-514, OT-525

2
OT 529

Child & Adolescent Intervention

This course is an application of OT concepts and processes to prevent and remediate occupational role dysfunction in individuals from infancy through adolescence. It includes exploration and application of selected therapeutic methods, strategies, and techniques. The laboratory includes guidance and practice in treatment methods. Level I fieldwork experience with children or adolescents is included. [3 hour lecture, 2 hour lab, level I fieldwork].

Prequisites: OT-501 OT-509 OT-510 OT-512 OT-520 OT-525 OT-527

4
OT 530

Adult/Geri Level I Fieldwork



Prequisites: OT-529 OT-633, OT-634 OT-635

1
OT 632

Fieldwork Seminar II

This seminar is designed to prepare students for fieldwork experiences and responsibilities. Personal and professional behaviors required on fieldwork are discussed. Strategies for success in fieldwork are offered, and preparation/ arrangements for fieldwork will be finalized. [1 hour per week].

Prequisites: OT-632

0
OT 633

Evaluation & Documentation II

This course is a continuation of OT 527 and offers an in-depth study of the evaluation and documentation principles and procedures used by occupational therapists. The evaluation process, types of assessments, and the interpretation and documentation of evaluation data pertinentto occupational therapy practice with adults and elders will be studied. [1 hour lecture, 2 hour lab].

Prequisites: ot-527

2
OT 634

Adult and Geriatric Intervention

This course is an integrated theory and practice course examining OT models and techniques for prevention and remediation of role dysfunction and maintenance of competence and adaptation in individuals from adulthood through senescence. Includes exploration of related research, introductory and advanced therapeutic assessments, and techniques. Laboratory includes guidance and practice in the implementation of assessment and treatment methods. Level I fieldwork experience with adults or elders included. [2 hour lecture, 3 hour lab, level I fieldwork].

Prequisites: OT-520, OT-633 OT-635

4
OT 635

OT Process & Theory III

This course is a continuation of the study of the theories, philosophies, and research that guide occupational therapy practice. Adult and geriatric practice environments and practice models will be studied. [2 hour seminar].

Prequisites: OT-425 or OT-525

2
OT 640

OT Clinical Fieldwork I

This course allows an in-depth Level I fieldwork experience that is integral to and consistent with the sequence, depth, focus and scope of content in the curriculum design of the program. Level I fieldwork can take place in a variety of traditional or emerging practice areas that are consistent with curriculum design and in which supervision will be provided by a currently licensed or credentialed OT, who may or may not be on-site. Each Level I fieldwork course is generally a full-time experience but options can vary from one placement to four, and in some instances be part-time.

Prequisites: 5 year BS/MS OT students take OT-215 OT-427 OT-429 OT-432OT-433 OT-434 OT-635Stand alone MS OT students take OT-515 OT-527 OT-529 OT-632OT-633 OT-634 OT-635

4
OT 641

OT Clinical Fieldwork II

This course allows an in-depth Level II fieldwork experience that is integral to and consistent with the sequence, depth, focus and scope of content in the curriculum design of the program. Level II fieldwork can take place in a variety of traditional or emerging practice areas that are consistent with curriculum design and in which supervision will be provided by a currently licensed or credentialed OT, who may or may not be on-site. Each Level II fieldwork course is generally a full-time experience but options can vary from one placement to four, and in some instances be part-time.

Prequisites: 5 year BS/MS OT students take OT-215 OT-427 OT-429 OT-432OT-433 OT-434 OT-635Standalone MS OT students take OT-515 OT-527 OT-529 OT-632OT-633 OT-634 OT-635

4
OT 644

Management of OT Services I

This course is an advanced, in depth analysis of the knowledge and practical skills required for the application of the principles of management within the various systems in which the provision of occupational therapy services to individuals and organizations takes place. Students will participate in interactive distance learning activities on the Internet and perform independent learning activities and assignments while on level II fieldwork. Students will be in contact via electronic communication with faculty and fellow classmates and engage in group discussions and project activity related to course material. (1 hours Internet activities per week)

Prequisites: None

1
OT 645

Management of Ot Services II

This course is a continuation of an advanced, in depth analysis of the knowledge and practical skills required for the application of the principles of management within the various systems in which the provision of occupational therapy services to individuals and organizations takes place. Students will participate in interactive distance learning activities on the Internet and perform independent learning activities and assignments while on level II fieldwork. Students will be in contact via electronic communication with faculty and fellow classmates and engage in group discussions and project activity related to course material. (3 hours Internet activities per week)

Prequisites: OT-641

2
OT 689

Professional Issues

This course involves critical analysis of current professional issues specific to the delivery of services provided by occupational therapists functioning in a variety of systems and roles. Regulatory agencies, legal concerns, reimbursement, specialization, grantsmanship, validation of theory, and development of philosophy are included as important issues. [2 hour seminar].

Prequisites: OT-640

2
OT 690

Community Practice

An advanced practicum in a community-or education-based setting, for the purpose of exploring new, nontraditional, or specialty applications of occupational therapy knowledge and skills. Requirements are based on a contract negotiated between the student and the preceptor, and approved by the course coordinator. Individuals with a variety of professional backgrounds and education levels may serve as preceptors. [Practicum (variable 5-15 hours per week) and 1 hour seminar per week]

Prequisites: OT-640

2

Total: 64

Research Components

Course Number Course Name Credits
OT 524

Research Seminar

This seminar introduces students to the entire thesis/project process required to complete the master's degree in OT. Students will learn how to search for and appraise literature pertinent to a topic suitable for OT research and evidence-based practice. [3 hour seminar].

Prequisites: Ot-101

3
OT 602

Research Methods in Occupational Therapy

This course will assist the student in developing an understanding of the research process. Emphasis will be placed on the occupational therapist as a producer and consumer of research. Students will undertake a conceptual review of research designs and methods relevant to the profession. [3 hour seminar].

Prequisites: College level applied statistics course.

3
OT 629

Research Advisement

Provides for a systematic investigation of a research problem selected by the student as an independent learning situation with faculty guidance. Completion of a thesis or project according to the guidelines in the D'Youville College graduate handbook. Students must register for their research director's section.

Prequisites: OT-610 or OT-612

3
OT 630

Continued Research Advisement

Provides continued faculty guidance to complete either the thesis or research project. Students must register for their research director's section.

Prequisites: Ot-629

1
*OT 693

Research Project Development

This course guides students through the process for development of the Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) Research Project. Students will develop a clinical question, then use a systematic review process to identify relevant research literature, perform a critical appraisal and synthesis of the best available evidence to develop and publically present their CAT research.

Prequisites: OT-524, OT-602

3

* as needed

Subtotal: 9-10

Elective:

Course Number Course Name Credits
OT 605

Clinical Field Work III



Prequisites: None

0

Subtotal: 0

Total required for M.S.: 73-75

Regulations

Academic Regulations

Academic regulations for occupational therapy are in addition to general college policies for all part-time and full-time students. Full-time and part-time students must meet all academic regulations listed below.

  1. Occupational Therapy Department Good Academic Standing
    1. To be in good standing while enrolled in graduate courses (500 & 600 level) a student must:
      1. Maintain a minimum semester and cumulative average of at least 3.0.
      2. Obtain a minimum grade of B in all graduate-level work
    2. To be in good standing in OT courses that are graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (OT 612, OT 693, OT 630, OT 640, OT 641), students must achieve a grade of Satisfactory. An Unsatisfactory grade in any of these courses constitutes a failure to meet academic regulations and will require the student to repeat the course.
  2. Occupational Therapy Department Academic Probation
    1. Students, whether full time or part time, who are not in good standing in the department is placed on OT department academic probation where they will remain until they meet the conditions of academic good standing for two full-time semesters. The conditions of OT department academic probation must be met in each successive (full- or part-time) semester, but probationary status is not removed until conditions are fulfilled during two full-time semesters (See grade and GPA requirements).
    2. Conditions of Occupational Therapy Department Academic Probation
      While on probation, failure to meet the following conditions will result in dismissal from the program. A student on probation must:
      1. for all 500- and 600-level courses over the next two full-time semesters:
        1. Receive no less than a "B" in all courses;
        2. Achieve a semester and cumulative average of at least 3.0;
      2. For the S/U graded OT courses listed in a2 of the OT department academic regulations section, over the next two full-time semesters, receive grades of S.
  3. Dismissal From the Occupational Therapy Program
    1. A student that is on OT department academic probation and does not meet the conditions of OT department academic probation will be dismissed from the OT department but not necessarily dismissed from the college. The dismissed student is encouraged to contact the director of retention services.
    2. A student dismissed from the OT department has the option to appeal the dismissal. In order to appeal, the student must write a letter to the chair of the OT department. The timeframe for submitting the letter will be indicated in the student's written notification of dismissal from the OT department. The letter must include:
      1. a description of verifiable extenuating circumstance(s) that prevented/hindered achievement of the conditions of OT department academic probation
      2. a plan to maximize future academic success
  4. Grades Below B Policy
    This policy applies to all 500- and 600-level OT courses. No more than a total of six credits or two courses (whichever better advances academic progress) with grades lower than B (B-, C+, C) are applicable to the occupational therapy degree. A grade of C- or lower is not applicable to the occupational therapy degree.
  5. Requirements for Level II Fieldwork
    1. Students must have the permission of the instructor before registering for Level II fieldwork courses (OT 640, OT 641). In order to obtain permission, students must demonstrate the ability to meet academic and professional standards of the program and participate in faculty-led professional development interviews in the first and second years of study.
    2. Receipt of a U grade in either OT 521 (Fieldwork Seminar I) or OT 632 (Fieldwork Seminar II) may alter the student's choices or plans for Level II Fieldwork.
    3. Students who receive a U in a Level II fieldwork course or who voluntarily withdraw from the course must receive approval from the faculty in the OT major before repeating the course. Students will not be allowed to repeat more than one Level II fieldwork course.
  6. Policy for Completion of Occupational Therapy Program in Timely Manner:
    Full-time and part-time students in the OT program must complete all academic requirements within three (3) semesters or one 12- month calendar-year following successful completion of both Clinical Fieldwork I and II (OT 640 and OT 641). This includes the semester following clinical fieldwork Level II when students return to campus to complete Professional Issues, Community Practice and research project courses and two (2) additional semesters. In addition to other academic requirements, Clinical Level II Fieldwork must be successfully completed within a 12-month period of completion of all other coursework or repetition of academic courses may be required.

    A student who does not complete Clinical Level II Fieldwork within the required 12-month period may need to repeat one or more of the following courses:
    • OT 527 OT Methods of Evaluation and Documentation I
    • OT 529 Child and Adolescent Intervention
    • OT 633 Methods of Evaluation and Documentation II
    • OT 634 Adult and Geriatric Intervention

    Students who do not complete their program within the time frame specified in this policy must petition for an extension of the time limit by submitting a completed “Request for Extension of Time to Complete the Master of Science Program” form, available in the graduate studies office. The form will be completed by the student and forwarded to the chair of occupational therapy who will sign and forward this to the graduate studies office on the student's behalf. [Refer to “Extension to Complete Graduate Degree” in the academic policies and procedures section of catalog, for the remaining steps in the procedure.]

Appeals

To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, you must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.

Admissions

Admission Requirements

The D'Youville College occupational therapy program is a participant of the Occupational Therapist Centralized Application Service (OTCAS), a program of the American Occupational Therapy Association that allows prospective students to use one application to apply to multiple participating OT programs through a single application process.  Interested applicants should refer to OTCAS to complete the application process and are required to follow OTCAS and D'Youville College OT program-specific instructions.

In addition to the general admission requirements for graduate programs at D’Youville College, applicants to the master’s in occupational therapy must meet the required minimum criteria and must present the following by November 30:

  1. Two letters of recommendation: one academic and one professional (or two academic). References from OT observations will not be accepted.  
  2. Evidence of completion of a baccalaureate degree with an official transcript.
  3. Evidence of capability to succeed in a graduate program as shown by a cumulative undergraduate G.P.A. of at least 3.0 (all grade point averages are based on a 4.0 system).
  4. Completion of the following prerequisite courses with a grade of C or better. Courses must be at least three credits and pass/fail grades are not accepted:
    1. General or Developmental Psychology (must cover life span development)
    2. Abnormal Psychology
    3. Sociology or Social Anthropology
    4. Applied Statistics
    5. Human Anatomy and Physiology I and II with labs or six to eight credits of a combination of other biology courses that focus on anatomy and physiology such as Comparative Primate Anatomy, Comparative Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology, Human Anatomy and Human Physiology, Anatomy and Physiology I and II, or their equivalents, at least one of which is a lab course, as determined by the registrar and the department.

    Upon admission, students will take a writing skills assessment. If the results indicate the need for remediation, students must follow through with recommendations. The faculty expects students to have basic computer skills for word processing, e-mail and online database and library searches. Students who lack any of these abilities should enroll in tutorials offered by the college or other institutions. Students are expected to participate in distance learning coursework through the OT curriculum.

Department

Occupational Therapy Department

The occupational therapy program is a five-year combined B.S./M.S. program. The curriculum begins with a strong liberal arts core. The core curriculum provides students with a general knowledge base and the opportunity to develop analytical abilities that are the foundation for excellence in the professional competencies. Students also declare and complete a structured minor. Professional development, with faculty guidance and support, is a consistent process for students prior to, during, and after clinical placements.

Students complete six months of full-time fieldwork experience provided at a variety of settings across the country. In addition to a strong academic and clinical preparation, students are expected to complete a master’s project involving research of a Critically Appraised Topic. The student-centered approach, in combination with the curriculum’s academic, clinical and research components provide thorough preparation for graduates to develop leadership and service in a variety of health care, educational and community settings, and to be successful in practice.