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Biology

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Overview

Biology Minor (Minimum of 18 Credit Hours)

Any D’Youville student not seeking a degree in biology could complete this minor. It could be used by those who wish to feature a biology foundation in their resumes.

Two Introductory Courses with Labs:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prequisites: Bio-101L

4
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prequisites: Bio-101

0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prequisites: CPC-022, BIO-102l

4
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prequisites: BIO-102

0

OR

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L and BIO-107R

3
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107

1
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-108

1

Three courses (a minimum of 10 credits) from:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L and BIO-107R

3
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107

1
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-108

1
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO-107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: Bio-208

0
BIO 216

Marine Biology

This is an introduction to the life of the seas. It begins with basic information about the chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. All major marine communities are surveyed, Including coastal zones and estuaries, coral reefs, the open ocean and the exotic communities of the deep sea. Extra attention is given to special topics of particular importance or interest. The final section concerns human interactions with the marine world and threats that they pose to it.

Prequisites: BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L

3
BIO 218

Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on their diverse patterns of form and function. Coverage of each group includes its distinguishing characteristics and patterns of adaptations for coping with the needs of life by following examples of selected species. Basic biological principles and special impacts on humans are discussed when appropriate. In the laboratory, live and preserved specimens from marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats are used to explore aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-218L

4
BIO 218L

Invertebrate Zoology Lab



Prequisites: BIO-218

0
BIO 229

Ecology

This is a broad introduction to the basic concepts of ecology as they pertain to population, evolutionary processes, communities and ecosystems. Several current environmental problems are explored in the light of these concepts. Laboratory includes a mix of lab and field exercises designed to put lecture topics into practice. The course consists of three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-229L

4
BIO 229L

Ecology Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prequisites: BIO-229

0
BIO 230

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230L

4
BIO 230L

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230

0
BIO 231

Environmental Geology

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resources, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231L

4
BIO 231L

Environmental Geology Lab

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resouces, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231

0
BIO 242

Evolution

Evolution is the single most unifying theory in the biological sciences. This course traces the beginnings of Darwinian-Wallace evolution by natural selection and places this theory in historical perspective. Current evidences of evolution are given and explained and evolution at the gene level is discussed. The emphasis of the course is on biological and biochemical adaptations to changing environments. Some limited treatment of population genetics is included.

Prequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3
BIO 3XX

One 300-level elective

Choose one 300-level elective BIO course
3
BIO 4XX

One 400-level elective

Choose one 400-level elective BIO course
3

*Minimum of 18 credit hours for a Biology Minor.