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Liberal Studies for Education B.A.

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Overview

Overview

Liberal studies for education is a bachelor of arts degree which prepares applicants interested in childhood-, and special-levels education. The program is designed to lead applicants toward a master of science in education. Special education and TESOL options are also available. It is also a terminal B.A. degree.

Students who maintain a cumulative average of 2.75 or better in their first two years of the program may begin taking graduate courses in the junior year. They can earn their master’s degree in education and be eligible for initial certification by the end of their fifth year of study. Not only does this permit early entry into teaching, but it results in considerable savings in tuition costs.

Applicants who enter the program follow a carefully sequenced curriculum in the liberal arts and sciences to ensure they have the necessary knowledge base for teaching. Required courses include study in English literature and writing, philosophy, foreign language, fine arts, math and natural sciences, and history, sociology and psychology. These courses are taught by faculty from the departments of liberal arts, and math and natural sciences. During their undergraduate years, students are guided by advisors in the education department.

Courses

Course Requirements

Liberal Studies for Education/ Education
Degree: B.A. Liberal Studies for Education + M.S. Education

Course Requirements for the Major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
EDU 101

Seminar in Education

This course provides students in the liberal studies for education program with an introduction to problems, issues and concerns in the field of education. A field experience component is part of this three credit hour seminar course. Students considering a career in teaching meet with education faculty, teachers and other professionals to discuss best practices, issues and concerns in education and plan and implement field experiences. The INTASC Standards are introduced as a framework.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
EDU 201

Historical Foundations Education in Us

This course is designed to provide the undergraduate liberal studies for education students with an in-depth study of the historical foundations of education. Emphasis is placed on key historical movements, eras and thinkers from education in the United States.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 335

Classroom Management & StudentMotivation

This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with models and practices that will assist them in the development of a wide repertoire of management techniques that can be effectively used in schools. Theories of human development, particularly with respect to the interrelations among social, emotional, psychological and intellectual development, will be explored in conjunction with inquiry regarding the foundations of educational research. Emphasis will be placed upon a teacher's ability to enhance the teaching and learning environment by developing effective instructional activities that engage students and enrich the classroom community.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 375

Technology in Education

This course is designed to provide the undergraduate teacher education student with an in-depth study of emerging technologies and their use in an educational setting.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 450

Assessment & Evaluation in Education

Teacher candidates will learn how to develop and use a variety of evaluation methods to monitor student academic achievement and teaching effectiveness. Special emphasis will be placed on relating evaluations to curriculum and instruction. Students will learn about standardized tests and other diagnostic tools frequently encountered and/or used by classroom teachers. Particular attention will be given to adapting assessments to meet the needs of all students. Students will plan, construct, administer and analyze data for formative and summative evaluation of achievement for a content unit. Contemporary issues related to testing, grading, evaluation and accountability will be addressed.

Prequisites: None

3

Subtotal: 15

Literature

Select one of the following two courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG

One English Elective

Choose one elective from ENG 215 or ENG 218
3
LIT

Two Literature Electives

Choose two 300-level Literature courses
6

Subtotal: 9

Philosophy and Religious Studies

Course Number Course Name Credits
PHI 204

Logic & Practical Reasoning

This course is a study of formal reasoning methods through informal fallacies, class logic and introduction to propositional logic.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
PHI 401

Philosophy of Person

This course examines the human person and personality in its philosophical context as well as the individual and society, alienation and self affirmation.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: any philosophy course or be in the Liberal Studiesfor Education program.

3
RS 102

Belief & Unbelief in the Brave New World

This introductory course in the phenomenon of religious faith examines the classic examples of the case for and against living in faith,with the view of enabling students to evaluate their own attitudes toward religion. Faith traditions of Western and Eastern cultures provide additional data for this evaluation.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

3

Subtotal: 9

Fine Arts and Foreign Languages

Course Number Course Name Credits
SPE 201

Public Speaking

This is an introduction to speaking before groups and includes techniques of speech preparation and delivery,adapting to the purpose of the speaking situation,and practice in various types of oral presentation in a comfortable workshop atmosphere.

Prequisites: None

3
ENG

One Elective from ENG 231 or ENG 237

Choose one elective from ENG 231 or ENG 237
3
FA

Two Fine Arts Electives

Choose two electives from Fine Arts courses
6
FL

Two Foreign Language Electives

Choose two electives from Foreign Language courses
6

Subtotal: 18

Social Sciences

Course Number Course Name Credits
HIS

One Elective from HIS 203 or HIS 204

Choose one elective from HIS 203 or HIS 204
3
HIS

One Elective from HIS 103 or other non-North American History (300-400 level course)

Choose one elective from HIS 103 or other non-North American History (300-400 level course)
3
PSY 101

General Psychology

This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include biology of behavior,sensation and perception consciousness, learning and memory,intelligence,motivation and emotion, stress and personality.

Prequisites: None

3
PSY 203

Developmental Psychology

This course explores milestones of physical,cognitive and psychosocial development from conception through old age. Emphasis is placed on global principles that guide human growth and change across the lifespan. The course meets the core requirement in psychology.

Prequisites: None

3
SOC 211

Our Changing Social World

This course is designed to help make sense of a rapidly changing world of increasing global interdependence,violence,expanding knowledge and telecommunications, changing values,clashes between religious and secular agendas,transforming family relations and shifting patterns of social inequalities. A number of explanations of social change will be identified and discussed. Special focus is placed on how major social trends influence individuals,intergroup relations and various organizations such as family,work and community. Students will enhance their abilities to plan and shape their own lives in the world around them.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
SOC 311

Sociology of Families

This course emphasizes the changes in contemporary families,composition of families,expectations of family members,current policies impacting families,and family as a political issue. Consideration is also given to the myths and stereotypes of family life.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: SOC-101 SOC-102

3

Subtotal: 18

Mathematics

Course Number Course Name Credits
MAT

Three Electives (exception of MAT 101)

Choose three electives from MAT with the exception of MAT 101
9

Subtotal: 9

Natural Sciences

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE/BIO/PHY

Five Electives (three must be with lab component, except CHE 105)

Choose five electives from CHE, BIO or PHY : at least one of each, three (3) must be with a lab component (except CHE 105)
18

Subtotal: minimum 18

Other Core Requirements

Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG 111

Introduction to Literature: Acad Writing

This course is an introduction to literature and the fundamentals of academic writing. Students learn the skills essential to college success:critical reading and analytical thinking, interpretation, scholarly discussion and collaboration, effective oral presentation, composition of writing for both readers and listeners.

Prequisites: None

3
ENG 112

Liberal Arts Seminar: Research Writing

This course teaches academic research skills and writing based on a liberal arts topic. Topics vary by instructor.

Prequisites: None

3
PHI/RS

One Elective from PHI 201 or RS 201

Choose one elective from PHI 201 or RS 201
3
PSC/ECO

One Elective from PSC 201, ECO 201, or ECO 202

Choose one elective from PSC 201, ECO 201, or ECO 202
3
SOC

One Elective from SOC 101 or SOC 102

Choose one elective from SOC 101 or SOC 102
3
CSC Core

One Elective

CSC Core
3

Subtotal: 18

Graduate Courses Available at the Undergraduate Level

Course Number Course Name Credits
EDU 621

Elementary School Gen Strat Math & Sci

This course is designed to familiarize students with instructional strategies, methods and materials necessary for creating productive teaching-learning environments for elementary students. Emphasis is on instructional planning, instruction and evaluation in math and science for grades 1-6. Students in this course are expected to demonstrate the ability to create positive,productive learning environments and to effectively plan for instruction and evaluation in math & science. This course also covers instruction for health & physical education.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 652

Curriculum Planning in Education

Emphasis in this course is on curricular design and instructional planning to address the special developmental and educational needs of students in elementary and secondary school. Attention is given to past and future trends in design and implementation and to appropriate planning techniques for meeting the needs of a diverse population of students at differing levels of social, physical, management and academic ability. Curriculum planning is examined on the state, district, school and classroom levels, along with the roles and responsibilities of administrators, teachers, school staff, students and community members.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 656

Philosophical & Social FoundationsEducation

This course is designed to introduce students to the social and philosophical foundations of education and ways in which they have been influential in shaping education in North America. As such, the course covers philosophies of education within the social/political context that influenced their development. Discussions, lectures, readings and student-centered work take place against the background of emerging philosophies of education in any given time period. A major focus of the course is on an examination of perennial questions related to education and schooling in North America.

Prequisites: None

3
SED 643

Theo Perspectives Mild Disabilities

This course is an in-depth analysis of principles and theory related to individuals identified as having mild disabilities. The focus will be on a non-categorical approach to education in the least restrictive environment by academic, social, management and physical needs. Emphasis will be given to analysis of needs, characteristics, identification/ referral and method of the processes involved in the development of theory in each area. Specific concerns related to the inclusion options for mildly involved students will be analyzed.

Prequisites: None

3
SED 644

Ed Severe Handicapped

This course is an in-depth analysis of the theory and research related to the nature and needs of severe, profound, and multiple handicapped individuals. Emphasis will be given to the theoretical basis of educational assessment, instructional techniques, social development and adaptive behavior, interactions with others, and service delivery systems. Philosophical and historical trends in the development of theory related to teaching these individuals, concept analysis, construction of theoretical relationships and the relationship between research, practice and theory in the field will be evaluated.

Prequisites: Sed-643

3

Subtotal: 9

Total: 123

The education program will allow up to three graduate courses to be taken while the student is an undergraduate. If a student wishes to take the entire three courses, two must fall in the senior’s final semester as an undergraduate. Further, it is expected that all juniors and seniors wishing to take graduate courses show substantial evidence of academic progress toward their undergraduate degree. Students in the liberal studies in education program must be juniors with a minimum of 56 credit hours accepted in the LSE program before taking any graduate education courses. Students may not take graduate courses in lieu of program-required courses.

Students who are making good progress towards their undergraduate degree may take three of the following courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
EDU 621

Elementary School Gen Strat Math & Sci

This course is designed to familiarize students with instructional strategies, methods and materials necessary for creating productive teaching-learning environments for elementary students. Emphasis is on instructional planning, instruction and evaluation in math and science for grades 1-6. Students in this course are expected to demonstrate the ability to create positive,productive learning environments and to effectively plan for instruction and evaluation in math & science. This course also covers instruction for health & physical education.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 656

Philosophical & Social FoundationsEducation

This course is designed to introduce students to the social and philosophical foundations of education and ways in which they have been influential in shaping education in North America. As such, the course covers philosophies of education within the social/political context that influenced their development. Discussions, lectures, readings and student-centered work take place against the background of emerging philosophies of education in any given time period. A major focus of the course is on an examination of perennial questions related to education and schooling in North America.

Prequisites: None

3
EDU 652

Curriculum Planning in Education

Emphasis in this course is on curricular design and instructional planning to address the special developmental and educational needs of students in elementary and secondary school. Attention is given to past and future trends in design and implementation and to appropriate planning techniques for meeting the needs of a diverse population of students at differing levels of social, physical, management and academic ability. Curriculum planning is examined on the state, district, school and classroom levels, along with the roles and responsibilities of administrators, teachers, school staff, students and community members.

Prequisites: None

3
SED 643

Theo Perspectives Mild Disabilities

This course is an in-depth analysis of principles and theory related to individuals identified as having mild disabilities. The focus will be on a non-categorical approach to education in the least restrictive environment by academic, social, management and physical needs. Emphasis will be given to analysis of needs, characteristics, identification/ referral and method of the processes involved in the development of theory in each area. Specific concerns related to the inclusion options for mildly involved students will be analyzed.

Prequisites: None

3
SED 644

Ed Severe Handicapped

This course is an in-depth analysis of the theory and research related to the nature and needs of severe, profound, and multiple handicapped individuals. Emphasis will be given to the theoretical basis of educational assessment, instructional techniques, social development and adaptive behavior, interactions with others, and service delivery systems. Philosophical and historical trends in the development of theory related to teaching these individuals, concept analysis, construction of theoretical relationships and the relationship between research, practice and theory in the field will be evaluated.

Prequisites: Sed-643

3

Students should consult with an education advisor before registering for graduate coursework.

Regulations

Academic Regulations

Academic regulations for students accepted into the program are in addition to general college policies for all part-time and full-time students. The program is divided into three stages as follows:

  1. Students are admitted into the program based on the criteria outlined in the D’Youville College Undergraduate Catalog.
  2. All undergraduate students' transcripts will be reviewed by the education department when students have completed 45 credits of coursework. Students will need to have a 2.5 or better G.P.A. overall and a 2.75 or better in the core courses. Candidates who do not meet these criteria will receive written notification that they are on academic probation for a semester and limited to no more than 13 credits for that semester.
  3. More than half the grades in each LSE category (education, literature, philosophy and religious students, fine arts and foreign languages, social sciences, mathematics, natural sciences, and other core requirements) need to be a C or higher.
  4. To be in good standing, students must maintain a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5. Students with less that a 2.5 G.P.A. may be dismissed from the program. (Note: A G.P.A. of 2.75 is required to begin taking graduate courses in the junior year.)
  5. Students who have maintained a G.P.A. of 2.75 or better begin taking graduate courses in education in the junior year.
  6. Before registering for graduate coursework, students must meet with an education advisor.
  7. No more than six credits of grades below a B (B-, C+, etc.) are applicable to the graduate degree.
  8. Any grade below C in the education department is considered failing. The course may be repeated.
  9. A course may be repeated only once.
  10. A student with two or more graduate grades below a C or with a cumulative graduate GPA less than 2.75 at any time will no longer be permitted to take graduate-level courses and will not be automatically admitted into the graduate programs in education.
  11. Students who have completed the bachelor of arts degree in liberal studies for education or in a major field, and have an overall G.P.A. of 2.75 or higher apply for admission into the master’s degree programs in the education department.
  12. All rules and regulations pertaining to graduate students at D’Youville College are applicable to graduate students in the education department. Students are also subject to specific rules and regulations in the education department.
  13. Students should refer to the D’Youville College graduate catalog for additional regulations which might be applicable.
Admissions

Admission Requirements

The program accepts applicants for full-time study from the freshman year. Students are admitted directly into the program. Qualified transfer students who have comparable preparation in the liberal arts and sciences are accepted on a space-available basis. A minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 is required for admission.

Department

Liberal Arts Department

A student seeking to become a liberally educated person needs exposure, in breadth and in depth, to the humanities and the social sciences.

These studies, concerned not merely with information but with values, help the student’s development as a total person. This implies not only intellectual and social development, but also maturity in assessing the values essential to a sound philosophy of life. The department of liberal arts offers degrees in English, global studies, history, liberal studies for education, psychology, sociology and philosophy. Requirements for these programs are listed in the courses of instruction section of this catalog. Courses are also offered in foreign languages, fine arts and religious studies.

Students within the department must maintain a minimum 2.00 grade point average in courses taken at D’Youville in their major subject area.