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Global Studies B.A.

Students engaging in conversation outside the Kavinoky Theater.

Global Studies, B.A.

Overview

Overview

The global studies major is an interdisciplinary program drawing on the diverse offerings of liberal arts at the college. The program prepares students to understand cultural differences from a broad interdisciplinary perspective and to examine more deeply a particular region of the world.

During their course of studies, students will be offered a study-abroad opportunity. The global studies faculty strongly recommend that students enter language-intensive programs abroad during a summer semester or regular semester, thus possibly satisfying the language requirement of the program and the expectation of foreign study at the same time.

The program will provide students with a strong interdisciplinary background, global awareness and hands-on regional knowledge sufficient to provide a working knowledge of the issues that face a particular region of the world. With globalization resettling the boundaries of commerce, and culture and politics in the world, a global studies degree will be highly prized by international and nongovernmental organizations.

To fulfill the requirements for a bachelor of arts degree in global studies, students must complete the following courses: GLS 101, GLS 102, GLS 444, BIO 215, ENG 215, ENG 216, HIS 211, PHI 306, PSC 250, SOC 203 and GLS 344 or four semesters of a foreign language.

In addition, students choose from one of three regional concentration areas, and complete a minimum of 12 credit hours in that area, with no more than nine hours from any one academic discipline. The areas and possible courses to choose from are as follows: Europe: ENG 300, 301, 308, 309, 310, 318, 344, FA 327, HIS 111, 329, 343, PHI 280, 305, 404, RS 209 or SOC 211. The Americas: ENG 218, 323, 342, 343, 344, 409, HIS 231, 341, 313 or SOC 211. The Non-Western World: ENG 344, 340, 341, HIS 103, 309, 350, HIS/SOC 420, PHI 308 or SOC 211.

All courses are offered during a two-year sequence or more frequently. Unless otherwise indicated, odd-numbered courses are offered in the fall and even-numbered courses are offered in the spring. Students in the major must maintain a minimum 2.0 G.P.A. in courses taken at D’Youville in their major subject area.

For further information, contact the chair of the liberal arts department at 716-829-7608.

Courses

Course Requirements

Global Studies
Degree: B.A.

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
GLS 101

Global Culture I Gov Tech Social Thought

This course offers analysis of political philosophies and governments in the modern world and promotes cross-cultural understanding: reviews racial, ethnic and sexual issues from a minority-majority perspective; and deals with issues of discrimination and oppression. The course will cover world history leading up to the current diffusion of population and the emergence of modern forms of communication and transportation that appropriate areas of inquiry for students in a professional program.

Prequisites: None

3
GLS 102

Global Culture II Lit Phil and the Arts

Multiple perspectives and modes of representation of global issues are examined using a variety of sources in order to equip students with the skills to analyze and evaluate different artistic representations and interpretations. This course explores topics in literature and the arts that are international in scope, whether through specific influences or in response to historical, philosophical, political and aesthetic developments.

Prequisites: None

3
GLS 444

Internship

The global studies internship is a variable credit (3-12 hours) required course that encourages juniors/seniors to investigate a career through a placement in a professional setting or in development of future projects (graduate study). This allows students to work under guidance of an immediate supervisor and/or a college faculty sponsor.

Prequisites: None

3

Subtotal: 9

Regional Concentrations (students choose one):

Minimum 12 hours in one area, with no more than 9 hours in any one discipline.

Europe:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG 300

Women Writers

This course brings together the artistic vision and contributions of outstanding women writers. The focus is on how women writers view women and the concerns of their time. Possible authors include Gwendolyn Brooks, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, Joyce Carol Oates, Flannery O’Connor, Katherine Anne Porter, Eudora Welty and Sylvia Plath.

Prequisites: ENG-111

3
ENG 301

Romantic and Victorian Literature

This course explores the fiction, prose, and poetry of the Romantic and Victorian period (1785-1900). Readings will vary to highlight the crucial historical events of the nineteenth century, including the rise of the British Empire, the effects of the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of the middle and working classes, and women's changing social roles.

Prequisites: ENG-111 ENG-112

3
ENG 308

Medieval Literature

This course explores the language, themes and context of Old English and Middle English literature. Old English texts, read in modern translation, often include the prose of King Alfred, Beowulf, and shorter poems such as The Wanderer and The Dream of the Rood. Selections from Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales are read in their original Middle English, while texts such as the Book of Margery Kemp, the Chester Play of Noah's Flood and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight are modernized.

Prequisites: ENG-111 ENG-112

3
ENG 309

Renaissance Literature

This course examines the writings of one of the richest periods of English literature. The emergence of humanism, the rediscovery of classical texts and the exploration of new lands inspired eminent writers, such as, Spenser, Sidney, Marlowe, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Marvell and Milton. The background of the Protestant Reformation, Tudor politics and the Civil Wars informs our close reading of a variety of texts, from love sonnets to the epic, from the demonic to the utopian.

Prequisites: ENG-111 ENG-112

3
ENG 310

Eighteenth Century Literature

Students will study the prose and poetry of the neoclassical period from its rise to prominence in the Restoration Period through the 18th century. Prerequisites:

Prequisites: ENG-111 ENG-112

3
ENG 318

Modern Continental Literature

This course is designed for students who are interested in European literature, but who want to elect a course given in English. Based on themes or works of universal interest, it gives students an opportunity to broaden their cultural horizons.

Prequisites: ENG-111 ENG-112

3
FA 327

Modern Art

The development of major European and American styles in architecture, painting and sculpture in the last two centuries, from neoclassicism to contemporary trends, is studied.

Prequisites: None

3
HIS 111

Growth of Western Culture

This course is a survey of the development of Western culture as divided into seven major epochs: Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the 19th century and the 20th century. This course meets the core requirement in history.

Prequisites: None

3
HIS 329

Twentieth Century Europe

This course is designed to deepen knowledge of the political developments of the period by a systematic study of the major events affecting 20th century Europe. Offered in the fall semester, every three years, beginning in 2001.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
HIS 343

Russia the West and Change

Beginning with Peter the Great, the course examines how Russia has attempted to keep up with Western technological and social development. Particular attention is given to the way communism structured this attempt since the Russian Revolution. Offered in the fall semester, every three years, beginning in 2002.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
PHI 280

Western Ancient Philosophy

This course takes a thematic approach covering the central philosophical ideas of the classical period from pre-Socratics to Plotinus. Emphasis is placed on the contributions of Plato and Aristotle to the development of Western philosophy and culture.

Prequisites: PHI-101 or PHI-201 or Permission of Instructor

3
PHI 305

History of Modern Philosophy I

This course explores the metaphysical and epistemological theories in their relation to a study of the main philosophical controversies in the 16th and 17th centuries. Students read works from Hobbes, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley and Hume, and are given a background on Kant.

Prequisites: Phi-201 or at Least Sophomore Status

3
PHI 404

Contemporary Thought

This course focuses on major contemporary currents as well as dialectical materialism, phenomenology,existentialism, analytic philosophy and representative readings.

Prequisites: PHI-101

3
RS 209

Major Western Faiths

This course surveys the main elements of the history, thought and practice of the major religious traditions of the Western world:judaism,christianity and islam.

Prequisites: None

3
SOC 211

Our Changing Social World

This course is designed to help make sense of a rapidly changing world of increasing global interdependence,violence,expanding knowledge and telecommunications, changing values,clashes between religious and secular agendas,transforming family relations and shifting patterns of social inequalities. A number of explanations of social change will be identified and discussed. Special focus is placed on how major social trends influence individuals,intergroup relations and various organizations such as family,work and community. Students will enhance their abilities to plan and shape their own lives in the world around them.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3

The Americas:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG 218

Minority Voices in American Literature

This is a survey of American literature that is written by and about ethnic minorities, including African Americans, Native Americans and others.

Prequisites: ENG-111

3
ENG 342

Magical Realism

This course will trace the development of the Latin American fiction style known as magical realism from the early 1920s to contemporary novels. Writers may include Carpentier, Arlt, Lispector, Bombal, Borges, Garcia-Marquez and Allende.

Prequisites: ENG-111

3
ENG 409

Variable Topics in Literature

This is a variable topic seminar that deals with selected themes or authors as announced when the course is offered.

Prequisites: ENG 111-ENG-112

3
HIS 341

Canada in Transition

This course provides students with a thematic approach to the historical, cultural, political, social and economic development of America’s closest foreign ally and major trading partner. Through the examination of Canadian colonial development, political evolution, cultural formation and economic diversification, students analyze a nation that is similar to the U.S. and yet quite unique. By studying Canadian policy toward native North Americans, students see how and why such a policy took a radically different approach from that followed in the U.S. This approach of comparison and contrast will be utilized throughout the course. Offered in the fall semester every three years.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
HIS 313

History of Latin America

A study of the Hispanic American civilization from earliest times to the present including such topics as the age of conquest, the colonial period, the ways of independence and the national period. Focus placed on current problems as well as Latin American relations with the United States. Offered as needed.

Prequisites: None

3
SOC 211

Our Changing Social World

This course is designed to help make sense of a rapidly changing world of increasing global interdependence,violence,expanding knowledge and telecommunications, changing values,clashes between religious and secular agendas,transforming family relations and shifting patterns of social inequalities. A number of explanations of social change will be identified and discussed. Special focus is placed on how major social trends influence individuals,intergroup relations and various organizations such as family,work and community. Students will enhance their abilities to plan and shape their own lives in the world around them.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3

The Non-Western World:

Course Number Course Name Credits
HIS 103

Comparing World Civilizations

This course surveys the origins and growth of the Confucian, Islamic and Western worlds, and examines how a concentration of political and economic ideas and technologies allowed temporary Western dominance. This course meets the core requirement in history.

Prequisites: None

3
HIS 309

History of the Far East

This course studies Far Eastern civilization and focuses on the 19th and 20th centuries. Emphasis is placed on China and Japan.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

3
HIS 350

Islam and Africa

This course examines the basic social and cultural implications of Islam, traces the initial impact in northern and tropical Africa and examines how Islamic factors have reasserted themselves after Western intervention in these areas. Offered in the spring semester, every three years, beginning in 2009.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

3
HIS 420

Variable Topics in History

This variable topic seminar deals with selected themes or topics that are announced when the course is offered. Offered as needed.

Prequisites: None

3
PHI 308

Eastern Philosophy

This course surveys Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism and Zen and compares Eastern and Western traditions.

Prequisites: None

3
SOC 211

Our Changing Social World

This course is designed to help make sense of a rapidly changing world of increasing global interdependence,violence,expanding knowledge and telecommunications, changing values,clashes between religious and secular agendas,transforming family relations and shifting patterns of social inequalities. A number of explanations of social change will be identified and discussed. Special focus is placed on how major social trends influence individuals,intergroup relations and various organizations such as family,work and community. Students will enhance their abilities to plan and shape their own lives in the world around them.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3

Subtotal: 12

In other academic areas required for the major:
Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 215

Environmental Science

This is an introduction to the principles of environmental science and considers how those principles can be applied to our understanding and solution of current environmental problems. The course consists of three lectures per week and is not eligible for elective credit in the major.

Prequisites: BIO-215L

3
BIO 215L

Environmental Science Laboratory

This is field and laboratory work designed to provide direct experience while investigating the basis for environmental principles. Students are exposed to the monitoring of environmental problems. The course is three laboratory hours per week and is not eligible for elective credit in the major.

Prequisites: BIO-215

1
ENG 215

World Literature I

This survey course in literary classics offers a variety of genres from non-English speaking cultures, from the ancient Greeks and Romans to continental European literature before 1800. A representative sampling of pre-19th century literature from the Far East will also be included.

Prequisites: ENG-111

3
ENG 216

World Literature II

This is a survey of recent literature, drawn from outside the English-speaking world, which both contributes to and critiques the dominant 20th century Anglo-American tradition.

Prequisites: ENG-111

3
HIS 211

History of Contemporary Foreign Policy

The basis of American foreign policy in the 20th century is examined in this course. It focuses on recent relations with other major industrial powers and on relations with a selected area of the developing world.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
PHI 306

Social & Political Philosophy

This course is a study of social and political theories in their relation to philosophical problems;the nature of the social and political institutions and obligations, the basis of knowledge of social and political obligations,the grounds for sound social and political decisions.

Prequisites: PHI-201 or RS-201

3
PSC 250

International Relations

This course is a practical study and application of theory and contemporary realities of relations among nations. there is a unit on international procedures and organizations,contemporary foreign policy problems. Students will actively participate in Model United Nations at Harvard University. Students may take this course more than once.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

3
SOC 203

Social Theory

The course is a survey of the development of sociological theories since the nineteenth century. How theory influences society and the sociocultural influences which shape theory are also explored. Emphasis is on theory in the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

Prequisites: None

3
FL/GLS

One elective from FL 1XX or GLS 344

Choose one elective from FL1XX or GLS-344
12

Major: 55
Core requirements and electives: 65
Total: 120

Admissions

Admission Requirements

Freshman Admission

Applicants must meet the following three criteria:

  1. Combined SAT scores of at least 900 (or ACT equivalent score of 18)
  2. A high school average of at least 80 percent
  3. A high school rank in the upper half of the class

Transfer Admission

Students must have a minimum G.P.A. of 2.33. Transfer credits will be determined on a case-by-case basis to assess adaptability to curriculum requirements.

Each student accepted into the program must submit a letter of intent prior to course registration.

Department

Liberal Arts Department

A student seeking to become a liberally educated person needs exposure, in breadth and in depth, to the humanities and the social sciences.

These studies, concerned not merely with information but with values, help the student’s development as a total person. This implies not only intellectual and social development, but also maturity in assessing the values essential to a sound philosophy of life. The department of liberal arts offers degrees in English, global studies, history, liberal studies for education, psychology, sociology and philosophy. Requirements for these programs are listed in the courses of instruction section of this catalog. Courses are also offered in foreign languages, fine arts and religious studies.

Students within the department must maintain a minimum 2.00 grade point average in courses taken at D’Youville in their major subject area.