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Dietetics B.S./M.S.

Professor teaching students about dietetics.

Dietetics, B.S./M.S.

Overview

Overview

The dietetics program is a five-year, entry-level master’s degree coordinated program with admission at the freshman year. Transfer students will be accepted on a space-available basis.

Students who complete all requirements specified by the five-year course of studies will be awarded both a B.S. and an M.S. degree in dietetics at the time of graduation and are eligible to take the national examination to become a Registered Dietitian (RD). In New York State, graduates who obtain the RD credential are eligible to apply to receive the Certified Dietitian/Nutritionist (CDN) credential.

The program has been approved and registered by the New York State Education Department and is currently granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Students admitted into the coordinated program (senior and graduate years) are considered graduates of an accredited program after their successful completion of the program and are eligible to take the registration examination for dietitians after graduation. Each graduate will also be provided a verification statement, which documents completion of all academic, supervised practice and degree requirements for the coordinated program and D’Youville College.

D’Youville College guarantees placement in the coordinated program if the student maintains the college’s and department’s academic standards. The coordinated program combines the classroom instruction and professional practice experiences required to become a registered dietitian.

Students gain practical experience in local facilities that support the development of professional skills in clinical dietetics, community nutrition and food service management. In addition, the program’s concentration in advanced nutrition practice provides higher level coursework and experiences in:

  • treating patients with complex conditions, such as trauma, pediatric hospitalizations, renal failure with complications and nutrition support
  • planning, developing and implementing nutrition intervention programs
  • developing and managing a nutrition business
  • planning and conducting research, including communicating findings of this research Requirements for program completion include achieving a satisfactory grade in all required courses, completing a thesis and passing a comprehensive examination.

Mission Statement

Recognizing the role of the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) as the nutrition expert and the key role that nutrition plays in health and well-being, the coordinated program strives to serve the community by providing students with the knowledge, skills and experience to meet the challenges of the diverse and changing fields of dietetics. Our intent is to prepare entry-level registered dietitian nutritionists who will become leaders in their fields and fulfill prominent and varied professional roles.

The coordinated program supports the principles of academic excellence, service to others, and lifelong learning by fostering the student's professional and personal growth within a broad range of educational and practical experience. 

Program Goals and Outcome Measures

Goal 1: Prepare graduates who are competent for entry-level practice as registered dietitian nutritionists and obtain employment in a variety of nutrition- and dietetics-related positions.

Outcome Measures:

  • Graduate satisfaction with curriculum
  • Employer satisfaction with graduates
  • Student completion of program
  • Pass rate on RDN exam
  • Employment of graduates

Goal 2: Prepare graduates who demonstrate a commitment to professional leadership and community service.

Outcome Measures:

  • Graduate participation in professional organizations
  • Graduate participation in community service

Goal 3: Prepare graduates who are committed to lifelong learning

Outcome Measure:

  • Graduate participation in continuing education activities

Outcome data are available on request.

Accreditation

The Coordinated Program in Dietetics is currently granted accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The address and phone number of ACEND are: 210 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190, Chicago, IL, 60606- 6995, 800-877-1600, ext 5400.

Courses

Course Requirements

Dietetics
Degree: B.S./M.S.

Course Requirements For the Major

In the specific area of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
DTC 101

Orientation to Dietetics

This seminar course will introduce the student to the educational and professional requirements within the field of dietetics. Students will be introduced to and understand the dietetics program curriculum standards and opportunities for personal and professional development within the college and community. An overview of the evolution of the field as well as current and future trends of dietetics will be provided. The course will explore career opportunities, career planning and professional roles and responsibilities of the registered dietitian. Students will be introduced to and understand the governance of dietetics practice including the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' Code of Ethics and the Standards of Professional Performance. This course is one hour per week.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

1
DTC 205

Food Science

This is a fundamental course in the basic principles of food preparation. Emphasis is on food chemistry, the function of ingredients and food preparation skills. The course consists of two lecture hours and two lab hours. Open to all students.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
DTC 210

Food and Culture

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the study of the social, cultural, and psychological factors which influence food selection. Cultural eating patterns and nutrition-related health problems of various ethnic and racial groups will be explored. An introduction to basic food preparation and culinary techniques will be used to further investigate food choices of various cultures. An emphasis will be placed on the strong influence of culture on food attitudes and behaviors which affects the counseling strategy of the health care professional. The effect of globalization on food selection and health will be studied. Assignments address current research regarding food and culture and encourage the student to explore nutrition practices of culturally diverse clients. This course consists of one lecture hour and two lab hours. Open to all majors; required course for dietetics majors.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

2
DTC 306

Principle of Nutrition

The course will introduce the student to nutrition science and public health issues related to nutrition. The fundamentals of carbohydrates, protein, lipids, vitamins, minerals and metabolism will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on diet planning and analysis, energy balance and the role of diet and physical activity in a healthy lifestyle and disease prevention. Highlights of current topics in nutrition, such as eating disorders, vegetarian lifestyles, and fad diets will also be addressed. Open to all students

Prequisites: BIO-108 CHE-102

3
DTC 319

Nutritional Biochemistry

This advanced course provides an in-depth study and discussion of the biochemistry and physiology of macronutrients and micronutrients. Applied topics, including regulation of metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance, and energy balance/body composition, are presented and explained in terms of related biochemistry and physiology. This course consists of three lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: BIO-303 BIO-108 DTC-306

3
DTC 327

Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle

This three-credit course will examine nutritional needs and issues throughout the life span with special emphasis on preconception, pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence and aging. Normal nutrition topics and nutrition-related conditions and interventions will be studied for each stage of the life cycle. Nutrient needs and recommendations will be addressed as well as age-related physiological changes. Specific attention will be given to current public health issues and model public food and nutrition programs. Current evidence-based practice recommendations will be covered with use of position papers by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Academy of Pediatrics. This course consists of three lecture hours.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

3
DTC 328

Nutrition for Fitness & Athletic Perform

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the integrated science of nutrition and exercise physiology. The course will explore macro- and micronutrient needs as related to energy demands, cellular function, and growth, maintenance, and repair. Students will explore how optimal nutrition is essential for optimal performance. The course will focus on scientifically sound, evidence-based practice and examine sources of unsound sport nutrition recommendations. Assignments will allow students to gain a greater understanding of the energy requirements of exercise as well as the barriers to increased physical activity. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2
DTC 409

Food Service Management I

This course provides an introduction to the structure and function of a food service department. Food service subsystems are discussed from an organizational and leadership perspective. This course will introduce the following operational areas: menu planning; procurement including purchasing; receiving and storage; food production and service. As needed, discussion will include food safety, sanitation and the management of human resources related to these topics. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: MGT-305 DTC-205, DTC-409L

2
DTC 409L

Quantity Food Preparation Lab

This course provides the application of the concepts and principles of quantity food preparation and service including planning and coordinating food production, recipe standardization and modification, and the application of food safety principles. Students develop the technical skills required for the preparation and service of meals to large groups, including cooking methods and terms and evaluating food for quality for the various recipe categories, including, but not limited to sauces, vegetables, meats, cheese, eggs and baked goods. Students are introduced to the use and maintenance of institutional food service equipment. This course consists of one lecture and two lab hours. Open to dietetics majors only.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-409

2
DTC 410

Food Service Management II

This course studies food service subsystems from an organizational and leadership perspective. This course will introduce the following operational areas: principles of financial control of food and labor, techniques for analyzing and managing costs, development of a business plan executive summary, and management of human resources including personnel recruitment, selection, training, evaluation and labor relations This course will introduce information on kitchen layout and design, sanitation, security, safety, infection control and emergency preparedness applicable to food service operations. This course consists of three lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: DTC-409 DTC-409L, DTC-410SP

3
DTC 410SP

Food Service Management SupervisedPractice

This course provides practice in food service management including: food service subsystems (purchasing, receiving and inventory control, production and service), marketing, quality management, financial control, human resources (personnel and labor issues), and facility layout and design. Students develop management skills through projects and/or field experiences, case studies, computer applications, and as required, quantity food preparation experiences. Students will be introduced to the behaviors, traits and skills that characterize effective leaders and learn to apply these traits in various personnel and food service management scenarios. This course consists of three supervised practice hours weekly. Open to dietetics majors only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: DTC-409 DTC-409L, DTC-410

1
DTC 418

Introduction to Professional Practice

This is the first course in the Coordinated Program (CP). It provides an introduction to dietetic practice, including standards that guide practice and professional performance, nutrition care process, medical terminology, and quality standards governing patient care in hospitals. Introductory didactic knowledge is presented, which prepares the student for development of clinical knowledge and skills in subsequent clinical courses. This course consists of one lecture hour. Open to dietetics majors only.
Offered in: Summer Only
Prequisites: DTC-319

1
DTC 420

Introduction to Nutrition Care

This course is an introduction to the professional practice of dietetics. Using the nutrition care process as a framework, students learn how to provide nutrition services to patients, including assessing, writing nutrition diagnoses, developing appropriate interventions, and monitoring response to care. This course consists of three lecture hours. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Summer Only
Prequisites: DTC-418, DTC-420SP

3
DTC 420SP

Intro to Nutrition Supervised Practice

This course is an introduction to the professional practice of dietetics. Using the nutrition care process as a framework, students provide nutrition services to patients, including assessing, writing nutrition diagnoses, developing appropriate interventions, and monitoring response to care. This course consists of twelve supervised practice hours per week. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Summer Only
Prequisites: DTC-418, DTC-420

1
DTC 426

Nutrition Education & Counseling Methods

This course presents the development, use, and evaluation of methods and materials for teaching nutrition to different audiences. Emphasis is given to both group and individual instruction in school, community, worksite, employee, and patient education settings. Communication skills essential for professional practice will include patient counseling, lesson plan development, evaluation and publication of educational materials, public speaking, and the use of assessment tools to document learning. This course consists of three lecture hours. Open to dietetics students only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

3
DTC 511

Medical Nutrition Therapy I (2 Credits)

The study of the biochemical and physiological basis for nutrition care in treating disease, including malnutrition, anemia, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Theory and practice in nutritional assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring is provided. This is the first semester of a two-semester course. This course consists of two lecture hours. Open to dietetics students in CP only.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-420 DTC-420SP, DTC-511SP

2
DTC 511SP

Medical Nutrit Therapy I Superv Practice

The clinical application of the biochemical and physiological basis for nutrition care for those with nutrition-related diagnoses and conditions discussed in DTC 511, including malnutrition, anemia, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Practice in nutritional assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring is provided. This course consists of nine supervised practice hours weekly. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-420 DTC-420SP, DTC-511

3
DTC 512

Medical Nutrition Therapy II (2 Credits)

The study of the biochemical and physiological basis for nutrition care in treating disease, including GI disorders, hepatic disorders, cancer, AIDS, renal disease, and nutrition support. Theory and practice in nutritional assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring is provided. This is the second semester of a two-semester course. This course consists of two lecture hours. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: DTC-511 DTC-511SP, DTC-512SP

2
DTC 512SP

Med Nutri Therapy II Supervised PracticePractice

The clinical application of the biochemical and physiological basis for nutrition care for those with nutrition-related diagnoses and conditions discussed in DTC 512, including GI disorders, hepatic disorders, cancer, HIV, renal disease, and nutrition support. Practice in nutritional assessment, diagnosis, intervention, and monitoring is provided. This course consists of nine supervised practice hours weekly. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: DTC-511 DTC-511SP, DTC-512

3
DTC 521

WIP Community Nutrition

The course offers a study of community nutrition needs and problems. The goals, organization, and history of selected government and private programs are investigated. This course is designated as a writing-intensive course and meets the college requirement as a WIP course. This course consists of three lecture hours. Open to dietetics majors only.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-420, DTC-521SP

3
DTC 521SP

Community Nutrition Supervise Practice I

This course provides supervised practice in community nutrition at area agencies, organizations, and programs. Students receive experiences in food insecurity/food assistance, maternal and child health, elderly nutrition, and adult nutrition. This course consists of six supervised practice hours per week. Open to dietetics majors only.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-420 DTC-420SP, DTC-521

2
DTC 522SP

Community Nutrition Supervised PracticeII

Students develop, implement, and evaluate a community nutrition intervention in this course. This includes completing a community needs assessment, identifying a target population, designing the program to be delivered, conducting the program, and collecting and assessing data on appropriate indicators to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. This course consists of three supervised practice hours weekly. Open to dietetics majors only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: DTC-521SP

1
DTC 524

The Nutrition Entrepreneur

This course applies business principles and entrepreneurship to the nutrition profession. Students learn how to plan, implement, and evaluate nutrition intervention programs. In addition, the knowledge, skills, and resources needed to establish and maintain a private practice are presented. This course consists of three lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: MGT-305 DTC-426 DTC-521

3
DTC 600

Nutrition Theory & Practice

The major theories that guide nutrition research and practice are presented and applied in this course. The scientific basis of nutrition research and practice are discussed, including evidence-based practice, clinical practice guidelines, the Nutrition Care Process and Model, and the theories and conceptual frameworks that guide research and practice. The interrelationship of theory, research, and practice is a major focus of this course. This course consists of three lecture hours. Open to dietetics majors only.

Prequisites: MAT-123

3
DTC 601

Research Methods in Dietetics

This course reviews dietetic and nutrition research methods, general research designs (both qualitative and quantitative), evaluation and assessment methods, application of statistical analysis in nutrition, and the presentation of research data. The course focuses on guiding the dietetic student in becoming a consumer and producer of nutrition-related research. This course consists of three lecture hours.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-600 DTC-420

3
DTC 610

Dietetics Thesis Seminar

This course involves discussion of current research in the profession. Students will identify and delineate a research problem and develop a thesis proposal. This course consists of three lecture hours. Requisites: Take DTC 601 - Must be completed prior to taking this course. Open to dietetics majors only.

Prequisites: DTC-601 Must be completed prior to taking this course

3
DTC 622

Professional Seminar (2 Credits)

This two-credit course provides the B.S./M.S. students the opportunity to practically apply their knowledge in the field of nutrition and dietetics and gain hands-on practice with the credentialing examination for the dietetics profession. This course consists of two lecture hours. Open to 5th year dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

2
DTC 631

Advanced Nutrition Practice I

This course is the first part of a two-course sequence. In conjunction with DTC 632 (Advanced Nutrition Practice II), this course provides advanced supervised practice experiences in clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and food service management at area hospitals, long term care facilities, food service establishments, community settings, and special rotation facilities. This course consists of 24 supervised practice hours weekly. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: DTC-512 DTC-512SP

8
DTC 632

Advanced Nutrition Practice II

This course is the second part of a two-course sequence. In conjunction with DTC 631 (Advanced Nutrition Practice I), this course provides advanced supervised practice experiences in clinical nutrition, community nutrition, and food service management at area hospitals, long term care facilities, food service establishments, community settings, and special rotation facilities. This course consists of 24 supervised practice hours weekly. Open to dietetics majors in CP only.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: DTC-631

8

In other academic areas required for this major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L and BIO-107R

3
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-107

1
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: BIO-108

1
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO-107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or(CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or bea chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3
BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prequisites: BIO-303

1
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prequisites: High school chemistry or CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prequisites: CHE-101

1
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prequisites: CHE-101,CHE-101L, CHE-102L

3
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prequisites: CHE-102

1
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prequisites: CHE-219

1
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course fromPHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L

4
MGT 305

Principles of Management

This course focuses on the nature and theory of management. It emphasizes the functional application of the basic principles of management to realistic business situations.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prequisites: None

3
HSA 613

Management in Healthcare Organizations

This course, for non-majors, presents the fundamentals of management that a health professional will need in filling management positions in health care organizations. The basic functions of supervision and the practical application of these skills are emphasized.

Prequisites: HSM-101

3
GRA 629D

Thesis Advisement - Dietetics

This course provides for a systematic investigation of a research problem selected by the student as an independent learning situation with faculty guidance. A student thesis will be completed according to the guidelines in the D'Youville College Thesis Handbook. Students must register for their thesis director's section.
3

Major: 79
Major requirements in other academic areas: 41
Remaining core requirements: 48
Total: 168

NOTE: These courses meet the knowledge and competencies established by the accreditation standards for entry-level education programs set by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics and are subject to change.

Regulations

Academic Regulations

Dietetics academic policies are in addition to college policies and are as follows:

  1. To be in good standing in the dietetics program in the first two years, students must maintain a cumulative G.P.A. of 2.5. Students who do not have the minimum average will not be allowed to progress to third-year courses.
  2. In the third, fourth, and fifth years (junior, senior, and graduate status), students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.75. In addition, students must have a 3.0 average in dietetics courses.
  3. Students must maintain a 3.0 average in 500- and 600-level courses. No more than two 500- and 600-level courses with grades less than a B (3.0) are applicable to the degree. A grade of C- (1.7) or lower is not applicable to any graduate degree.
  4. A minimum of a B grade (3.0), which is equivalent to an S grade, is required in the following courses: DTC 410SP, DTC 420SP, DTC 51lSP, DTC 512SP, DTC 521SP, DTC 522SP, DTC 631, and DTC 632. Students will be allowed to repeat only one of these courses. A minimum of a B- grade (2.7) is required in all remaining dietetics courses. Students will be allowed to repeat a given course once upon recommendation of the dietetics faculty.
  5. A minimum of a C grade (2.0) is required in all prerequisite courses for the dietetics major.
  6. Students who receive an unacceptable grade in a course required for the major must repeat the course and receive an acceptable grade within two full-time semesters of initially taking this course. Failure to do so will result in dismissal from the program.
  7. Students who do not meet these academic standards will be placed on probation for the two full-time semesters that immediately follow the date of probation. The student must meet with his/her academic advisor within 30 days of the receipt of his/her letter to establish a written plan of correction. All students on probation must meet the academic standards for the program. Failure to meet academic standards will result in dismissal from the program.
  8. DTC 622 must be taken within one year of graduation. Students who have taken this course more than one year before graduation must repeat the course.
  9. Students must successfully pass a comprehensive examination within the deadline established by the program in order to be cleared for graduation from the dietetics program. The examination may be repeated one time. A second unsuccessful attempt on the comprehensive examination will result in dismissal from the program.
  10. In addition to all college academic integrity policies, students are expected to maintain high standards of personal behavior and professional conduct in the academic and clinical environments. College policy regarding academic dishonesty will be followed. Professional misconduct or unprofessional behavior in the clinical setting will result in failure of the course regardless of course mastery and may result in immediate dismissal from the program.
  11. A student who has not registered for consecutive semesters in the dietetic program (i.e., withdrawal, dismissal, leave of absence, failure to re-register) and desires to return, in addition to meeting college requirements, must schedule a personal interview with the dietetic department chair. This interview must be conducted before a decision can be made regarding continuing with the program.

Costs of the Program

Students should be aware of the costs necessary for their supervised practice education in addition to tuition or class fees. Program costs are estimates and are subject to change without prior written notice.

Additional Program Cost (2017-2018)
Item Cost
Transportation to SP site** $100/semester (junior/summer)
Transportation to SP site** $175/semester (senior year)
Transportation to SP site** $350/semester (fifth year)
Lab coat/ID $50
Liability Insurance $50/semester
Academy Student Membership $65/year
Thesis Presentation Poster $40
Third-Year Summer Semester Textbooks $425
Fourth-Year Textbooks $450/semester
Fifth-Year Textbooks $125/semester

**Estimated $.50 per mile, with an average trip of 12 miles plus parking

Appeals

To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, you must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.

Admissions

Admission Requirements

Admission requirements reflect the structure of the program as a five-year bachelor of science and master of science degree. In order to be considered for admission into the pre-professional phase, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. Combined SAT scores of at least 1000 or composite ACT score of 21;
  2. High school average of at least 85 percent or 2.85 on a 4.0 scale;
  3. Standing in the upper half of the graduating class.

Transfer students are encouraged to apply and are accepted on a competitive, space-available basis. Most graduates in diet technology or food service can transfer the equivalent of two years credit. Requests for transfer at the B.S. or B.A. level are welcome. A minimum 2.75 G.P.A. is required to be accepted into years one and two. Transfer students entering year three or year four (supervised practice portion) must have a minimum 3.0 G.P.A.

Freshman students must demonstrate successful completion of the following high school courses: two years of math, one year of biology and one year of chemistry. The students will be selected from the pool of applicants on the basis of the above criteria. Decisions will usually be made by March for the fall semester.

Late applications will be processed on a space-available basis.

Department

Dietetics Department

The dietetics program is a five-year combined B.S./M.S. degree program for full-time or part-time students. Upon graduation, students are awarded a dual bachelor of science and master of science degree. This coordinated program (CP) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) and offers the required courses and practical experiences to be eligible to take the national examination to become a registered dietitian. The program’s concentration in advanced nutrition practice provides higher-level course work and experiences in:

  • Treating patients with complex conditions, such as trauma, pediatric hospitalizations, renal failure with complications and nutrition support
  • Planning, developing and implementing nutrition intervention programs
  • Developing and managing a nutrition business
  • Planning and conducting research, including communicating findings of the research