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Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.)

Professor going over x-rays with two students.

Doctor of Chiropractic, D.C.

Overview

Overview

The doctor of chiropractic program (D.C.P.) leads to a first professional degree. The curriculum concentrates on specialized chiropractic skills and application of research methodologies to evidence-based practice. It encompasses class work, labs, and clinical rotations over a period of 11 trimesters. Internship and externship experiences include 35 hours a week at a variety of clinical settings including, but not limited to the college’s clinics, externships, and placement in community-based institutions, hospital rotations, and private practices.

Program Mission Statement

The department of chiropractic of D’Youville College, through quality academics, research, scholarship and service, prepares future and existing doctors of chiropractic as primary health care practitioners, and spinal specialists, and for a significant role among the health professions.

Vision Statement

D’Youville College department of chiropractic faculty, students and alumni are actively engaged with the chiropractic profession and the wider world, influencing both through education, research, and service. As a result, members of the chiropractic profession are respected partners with all other health care professions in the delivery of direct services to patients, the implementation and development of patient-centered best practice protocols, and the use of integrative clinical management strategies that improve health outcomes.

Strategic Intent

The department of chiropractic at D’Youville College will be a recognized center of academic and clinical excellence in chiropractic education, practice and research, and the first choice for chiropractic students both nationally and internationally.

The department of chiropractic adheres to the core values and principles of D’Youville College. In addition we bring forward the following as having particular importance to the department:

Core Values

  • Evidence-based best practice is at the center of what the department teaches, and is the foundation of our research.
  • Social responsibility is important to the profession and is demonstrated by contributing to the health and well-being of patients, the community, and at-risk populations through advocacy, education, volunteerism and service.
  • Continuous quality improvement is the means to discovering best practices and providing the very best clinical and teaching outcomes.
  • Collaboration with other departments and health professions is beneficial within the context of our mission and is fundamental to achieving our goals.

Accreditation

The program is approved by the New York Board of Regents and is registered with the New York State Education Department. The doctor of chiropractic degree program at D'Youville College is awarded programmatic accreditation by the:

Council on Chiropractic Education
8049 North 85th Way
Scottsdale, AZ, 85258-4321
Tel: (480) 433-8877
Website: www.cce-usa.org

Individuals with complaints about compliance of the program with the CCE Standards should be directed to the CCE at the above address. Students who successfully complete the doctor of chiropractic program are eligible to sit for the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) and the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board (CCEB) licensure examinations.

Doctor of Chiropractic (D.C.) Licensure

Students should be aware that graduation from an academic program does not guarantee licensure, registration, and/ or board certification for entry into practice. It is the student’s responsibility to check with the state licensure board in the jurisdiction(s) in which they wish to practice for any additional requirements that must be met for licensure in that state, and to meet those requirements if they desire to obtain licensure to practice in that state. For a complete list of individual state requirements please see www.fclb.org.

Graduates who pass the NBCE examinations may apply for licensure in all states. Students are advised that some states may have additional or special requirements that must be met in order to obtain licensure in that state. For example, some states currently require a baccalaureate degree in addition to a doctor of chiropractic degree to apply for licensure. In some cases, the baccalaureate degree must be earned prior to entering the chiropractic program. In other cases, the baccalaureate degree may be earned concurrently with the doctor of chiropractic degree. Individual state requirements for chiropractic licensure are subject to change. New York State requires specific undergraduate courses and green card/citizenship in order to qualify for New York state licensure. Please see www.nysed.gov for specifics.

Courses

Course Requirements

Doctor of Chiropractic
Degree: D.C.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 507L

Human Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory

This course consists of two hours of laboratory a week. The structural and functional relationship of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs are emphasized.

Prequisites: None

1
BIO 508L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Laboratory

This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week, emphasizing the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system,urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development.

Prequisites: None

1
BIO 603

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods,vitamins and nutrition.

Prequisites: None

3
BIO 603L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Bio 603.

Prequisites: None

1
BIO 607

Pathophysiology

This is a study of disease processes as disturbances of the body's homeostasis. The body's defense mechanisms and their breakdown are emphasized. Various clinical assessment methods are discussed. The course consist of three lectures a week.

Prequisites: None

3
BIO 608

Microbiology

This is an introduction to the classification, morphology and physiology of microorganisms, particularly of bacteria and viruses, with laboratory emphasis on sterile technique, cultural characteristics and physiology of bacteria. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prequisites: None

4
BIO 608L

Microbiology Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Bio 608.

Prequisites: None

0
BIO 610

Immunology

Humans are continually exposed to foreign substances (antigens) and respond to them in ways that are both harmful and beneficial. Many areas of biology use the in vitro techniques of immunology. Thus, immunology integrates such diverse fields as genetics, biochemistry, physiology and medicine and is relevant for biology and health science students alike. The purpose of this course is therefore to introduce the student to the chemistry of antigens and antibodies, the biology of the immune response, including both harmful and beneficial aspects in the function of the cells, organ and molecules of the immune system. Immunologic techniques and their applications will also be examined.

Prequisites: None

3
BIO 639

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply, and functions in movements. Additional dissections involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity.

Prequisites: BIO-639L, (BIO-507L BIO-508L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108BIO-108L) or (BIO-317 BIO-317L) or (BIO-517 BIO-517L) orequivalent.

6
BIO 639L

Gross Anat Lab

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply, and functions in movements. Additional dissections involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity.

Prequisites: None

0
BIO 659

Advanced Physiology I

These courses are comprised of discussions of the molecular attributes of cytological features that represent the underpinnings of such functions as nerve impulse and neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, cardiac muscle excitation and coordination of contraction, processes of electrolyte and water balance, actions of chemical messengers such as hormones and drugs, gas transport and cellular respiration, nutrition, metabolism and excretion.

Prequisites: None

3
BIO 660

Advanced Physiology II

These courses are comprised of discussions of the molecular attributes of cytological features that represent the underpinnings of such functions as nerve impulse and neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, cardiac muscle excitation and coordination of contraction, processes of electrolyte and water balance, actions of chemical messengers such as hormones and drugs, gas transport and cellular respiration, nutrition, metabolism and excretion.

Prequisites: None

3

Subtotal: 28

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHR 670

Professional Communications

This class is an overview of fundamental professional writing as it applies to professional communication. Each week students will participate in active learning through reading,discussion,completing exercises,written assignments, peer editing,and revision. The overall objective of this course is to create/reinforce sound written and oral communication skills in students preparing to become clinicians.

Prequisites: None

2
CHR 671L

Eip 1: Information Literacy Lab



Prequisites: None

1
CHR 672

EIP II Resh Meth Design & Stats Intp

This is the second course in the evidence-informed practice (EIP)sequence. The course is a qualitative introduction to the fundamental structure of research. It introduces The different types of research studies,and addresses the basic statistical tools involved in evaluating various research designs. Students will learn how to interpret statistical results in the context of clinical applications. The course prepares students to read and understand biomedical literature,enabling them to be up-to-date on the latest research in their field and allowing them to offer their patients the best evidence-informed care available.

Prequisites: CHR-671

3
CHR 673

EIP III: Chiro Prin: Evid Inform Pract

This is the third course in the evidence-informed practice (EIP)sequence. This course builds on Chr 672 and will concentrate on concepts of evidence-informed practice with a specific focus on evidence informed chiropractic. EIP is the future of our healthcare system and will drive future best practice in all professions. This course is intended to teach students to better assist the patient through EIP guided reasonable and rational decisions about health care.

Prequisites: CHR-672

3
CHR 674L

EIP Iv: Journal Club Seminar

This seminar lab course is the fourth in the evidence-informed practice (EIP)sequence. This is an interactive course designed to sharpen the students' research literacy and evidence-informed practice (EIP)skills. Applied EIP is emphasized,including questioning,researching,analyzing and communicating clinically relevant information. The overall objective of this course is to create sound EIP habits in students,preparing to become doctors of chiropractic. Students will research,develop,and present a journal club of clinically relevant,important,and applicable biomedical research literature to a small group of peers and practicing clinical mentors and professionals. Students will apply key EIP skills(asking,accessing,appraising,applying, and assessing) along with the concept of critical appraisal fo the literature. Emphasis is placed on how the research and clinical literature impacts clinical decisions in chiropractic practice.

Prequisites: CHR-673

1

Supportive:

Course Number Course Name Credits
HSA 612

Culture in Healthcare

This interdisciplinary course is open to students from all graduate programs who are interested in the impact of culture on health, and in development of culturally appropriate interventions for communities. It will build on epidemiological concepts and apply anthropological methodologies to understanding the impact of culture on health status, service utilization, and cultural conflicts between health care providers and members of ethnic communities.

Prequisites: None

1
CHR 634

Intro to Epidemiology & Public Health

This course is focused on the discussion of different definitions and descriptions of what constitutes public health, the contributions and value of public health and the interface that exists between chiropractic practice and public health. The Wellness Model of Healthy People 2010 and levels of prevention are discussed along with examples as to how basic public health concepts should be incorporated into the development of a comprehensive chiropractic plan of care. Lectures cover such topics as the impact on public health by environmental factors, d and nutrition, infectious diseases, chronic diseases, physical fitness,musculoskeletal conditions, accidents and physical injuries, and tobacco, alcohol and drug abuse. Emphasis is placed on reviewing health care and public health literature and on integrating evidence based research findings into clinical practice. The importance of incorporating health teaching and counseling related to disease prevention and health promotion into the chiropractic plan of care and on understanding public health as a personal responsibility is stressed. The need for more integration of chiropractic into the mainstream public health system is discussed.

Prequisites: None

3
HSM 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prequisites: None

1
PHI 609

Ethics in Health Care

This course addresses ethical issues frequently encountered by health care managers. Topics considered include bioethical theory, policy formation and decision making in the professional setting. Specific problems discussed include such issues as the right to health care, allocation of scarce resources, human experimentation and choices regarding death.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prequisites: None

3

Subtotal: 8

Chiropractic:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHR 600L

Introduction to Chiropractic Lab

Clinical laboratory sessions comprise additional instruction, demonstration and practice of the following chiropractic evaluation techniques: static palpation, postural evaluation, spinal landmark evaluation, leg-length evaluation and Maigne's method of evaluation.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO 639L

2
CHR 613

Pharmacology I

The pharmacology course series integrates the principles and mechanisms of action and drug effect with the pharmacotherapy of common disease and syndromes.

Prequisites: None

3
CHR 614

Pharmacology II

This course is a continuation of Pharmacology I.

Prequisites: CHR-613

3
CHR 621

Physiologic Therapeutics

This course studies the therapeutic utilization of heat, cold, light, electricity and sound. Students analyze physiologic responses to therapeutic modalities and evaluate their effectiveness as therapeutic agents. This course also includes a review of research relative to the therapeutic modalities. Theories and methods of the holistic approach to management of acute and chronic pain syndromes are presented. Laboratory experiences include practice sessions to gain experience in the utilization of heat, cold, light, electricity and sound for management of acute and chronic pain syndromes.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO-639L CHR-600L CHR-640 CHR-640L, CHR-621L

3
CHR 621

Physiologic Therapeutics

This course studies the therapeutic utilization of heat, cold, light, electricity and sound. Students analyze physiologic responses to therapeutic modalities and evaluate their effectiveness as therapeutic agents. This course also includes a review of research relative to the therapeutic modalities. Theories and methods of the holistic approach to management of acute and chronic pain syndromes are presented. Laboratory experiences include practice sessions to gain experience in the utilization of heat, cold, light, electricity and sound for management of acute and chronic pain syndromes.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO-639L CHR-600L CHR-640 CHR-640L, CHR-621L

3
CHR 621L

Physiological Therapeutics Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in CHR 620.

Prequisites: BIO-639 CIO-639L CHR-600L CHR-640 CHR-640L, CHR-621

2
CHR 623

Clinical Internship I

The focus of this course is on comprehensive health: wellness maintenance, illness prevention and restorative care. Patients of different age groups and cultural backgrounds are treated. The practice emphasis is on the structure and function of the body’s neuromusculoskeletal framework and the relationship this framework has tithe health and well-being of the whole person (bio-psycho-social-spiritual). Spinal manipulation is the major intervention. The range of services provided include the use of diagnostic imaging to evaluate patients with neuromusculoskeletal, related health problems and pathologies, physiotherapeutic modalities, lifestyle and nutrition counseling; and the use of a variety of myofascial and rehabilitative procedures considered alternative and complementary in nature. Additionally, students are taught the importance of case management and/or utilization of referral and follow-up procedures for patients experiencing pathologies that require co-treatment with other licensed health care providers.

Prequisites: BIO-507L BIO-508L BIO-603 BIO-603L BIO-607 BIO-608BIO-608L BIO-610 BIO-639 BIO-639L BIO-659 BIO-660 CHR-654CHR-657 CHR-664 CHR-665 CHR-637 CHR-636 CHR-643 CHR-614CHR-634 as well as a passing score on NBCE or CCEB(Canadian students)and IRB approval.

7
CHR 624

Clinical Internship II

This course is a continuation of CHR 623, Clinical Internship I.

Prequisites: CHR-623

7
CHR 625

Clinic Internship III Preceptorship

This course builds on the clinical internship requirement. The same focus on practice continues; however, externship hours are completed in a variety of community-based clinical settings under the supervision of qualified adjunct clinical associates.

Prequisites: CHR-624

7
CHR 631

Biomechanics

This course will introduce the student to basic biomechanics. This will include the understanding of basic terminology associated with human movement in three planes. This course will also present an introduction to kinematics and kinetics as it pertains to human movement both normal and abnormal. Clinical case studies will be analyzed with specific attention placed on the most commonly treated chiropractic diagnoses as they relate to clinical practice. An analysis of upper and lower extremity joint mechanics will be introduced. Specific attention will be placed on spinal biomechanics both normal and abnormal.

Prequisites: CHR-635 CHR-635L CHR-600L

3
CHR 633

Clinical Nutrition

This in-class course will provide the student with an understanding of the principles and practices of "evidence-informed clinical nutrition" and its importance in patient centered management. The subject will review the basic biochemical properties of nutrients as well as common diagnostic tests to identify a condition,recommend specific nutrients and monitor therapeutic benefits of these recommendations. This course will serve as a capstone course to compliment other core curriculum nutrition courses of the DYC doctor of chiropractic program. The format of the course will include Power Point presentations,discussions,case analysis,and review of the best available evidence in the current literature.

Prequisites: BIO-603 BIO-607 CHR-610 CHR-640

2
CHR 635

Spinal Anatomy

This course involves an in-depth study of the nervous system including: embryology, neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neuropharmacology. This course will include laboratory sections of the anatomy of the spine bones, muscles, and nerves by examining specimens.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO-639L, CHR-635L

4
CHR 635L

Spinal Anatomy Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lecture in Chr 635.

Prequisites: CHR-635

1
CHR 636

Sports Injuries & Emergency Care

This course shall prepare the health care practitioner to appropriately evaluate and provide basic lifesaving skills for a variety of medical emergencies. Such medical emergencies can present themselves to a health care practitioner in a variety of settings including, but not limited to,one's clinical practice, a sporting event or during personal time. This course will prepare the health care practitioner to appropriately evaluate the safety of the scene of the emergency,clinically evaluate the patient's injuries, and treat/ stabilize said injuries utilizing basic life savings and other clinical management techniques. Additionally, this course will relate the general training and goals of a medical team,as well as members of the emergency medical services team, to better prepare the health care practitioner to collaboratively engage with these individuals.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO-639L CHR-640 CHR-640L, CHR-636L

1
CHR 636L

Sports Injuries & Emergency Care Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 636.

Prequisites: BIO-639 CHR-640, CHR-636

2
CHR 637

Chiropractic Rehabilitation

Students in this course learn the contemporary use of exercise for the rehabilitation and functional restoration of the musculoskeletal system. The course is taught in a case-based format, providing practical information for planning, prescribing and monitoring exercise programs in a region-specific context. Students also learn the indications and contraindications for therapeutic exercise prescription and concepts of exercise progression. They develop an understanding of the chiropractor’s role in functional recovery as it pertains to occupational issues and disability management.

Prequisites: CHR-621 CHR-621L CHR-655 CHR-655L, CHR-637L

2
CHR 637L

Chiropractic Rehabilitation Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 637.

Prequisites: CHR-621 CHR-621L CHR-655 CHR-655L, CHR-637

3
CHR 638

Psychology for Health Care Professionals

The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge concerning issues they may face as future practitioners regarding themselves and their patients. Specifically, the course will provide an overview of mental health concerns, crisis issues, pain management and self-care. Attention will also be given concerning how these issues are to be addressed as students work with future patients along with attempting to make appropriate referrals.

Prequisites: None

3
CHR 639

History & Physical Examination

Examines all areas of patient interviewing such as history of present illness, comprehensive health history, recordkeeping, problem-oriented history-taking, narrative format histories, nonverbal communication, and patients with special problems. Students learn and practice examination and assessment, with emphasis on performing and interpreting comprehensive physical examination procedures of the non-neuromusculoskeletal systems in the adult patient. Laboratory experience will include continuing demonstration and practice of the history taking and physical exam procedures.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO-639L, CHR-639L

3
CHR 639L

History & Physical Examination Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 639.

Prequisites: BIO-639 BIO-639L, CHR-639

3
CHR 640

Clinical Diagnosis

Introduction to laboratory skills, including venipuncture, and discussion of urinalysis, hematology and serology. Emphasis on interpretation of laboratory test results and study of case histories to enhance clinical learning and diagnostic skills. Discussion of laboratory alterations accompanying abnormal function of body organs and specific diseases, with emphasis on interpretation of blood chemistries. Choosing appropriate lab tests. Correlation of laboratory results with patient history and examination findings. Case histories are discussed to enhance clinical learning.

Prequisites: BIO-607 BIO-610 BIO-639 CHR-639 CHR-639L, CHR-640L

6
CHR 640L

Clinical Diagnosis Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 640.

Prequisites: BIO-607 BIO-610 BIO-639 CHR-639 CHR-639L, CHR-640L

1
CHR 641

Historical Foundations

This course will introduce the student to the historical foundations of our profession. They will become familiar with the key individuals and events that created and shaped Chiropractic as a profession. The student will examine the historical relationship with other professions.

Prequisites: None

1
CHR 642

Chiropractic Theories & EvolutionTheories & Evolution of the Profession

This course will introduce the student to the historical evolution of the theories of the chiropractic subluxation. They will become familiar with the key theories that have helped to shape chiropractic as a profession.

Prequisites: CHR-641

1
CHR 644

Business Entrepreneurship

This four credit graduate level course introduces students to principles of chiropractic office management, important aspects of business planning, and financial considerations necessary to successfully establish and manage chiropractic practice. Students explore external and internal factors impacting their cost-effective service to patients, adherence to sound ethical behavior, and application of sound business principles. The course serves as a vehicle for students to integrate prudent business planning and decision-making in the management of a chiropractic office/ practice.

Prequisites: None

4
CHR 646

Geriatric & Special Needs Populations

This course will provide students with knowledge and skills necessary for health assessment of the geriatric and special needs patient. Emphasis will be placed on the collection and synthesis of information leading to the development of a comprehensive plan of evaluation and care. Evidence-informed practice concepts related to health promotion,disease prevention, and treatment will be utilized to develop critical thinking and diagnostic reasoning skills.

Prequisites: CHR-640

2
CHR 647

Pediatrics & Women's Health

This course provides the student with a comprehensive evidenced-informed approach to the unique health and wellness concerns of pediatric and female patients. The course will review the developmental milestones of pediatric patients,through a review of examination,assessment,and chiropractic case management protocols.Unique women's health conditions will be reviewed and specific chiropractic case management protocols will be introduced in this course. The course will include didatic PowerPoint presentations,case analysis in an active learning format,and treatment demonstrations.

Prequisites: CHR-640

2
CHR 650

Adjustive Techniques I

This course will present contemporary theories of chiropractic science and practice related to the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of spinal dysfunction. Theory of segmental dysfunction, outcome measures of dysfunction, theory of facilitation, and clinical management of spinal dysfunction across the age continuum will be included. The student will be introduced to a cross referencing approach to treatment of the vertebral subluxation complex utilizing the diversified technique, Palmer-Gonstead, orthogonality, and the motion-spatial / fixation concept. The course will review current research related to somatovisceral influences and their associated pathophysiology and neurodystrophy. The clinical laboratory will comprise an integration of biomechanics and physical assessment skills, with emphasis on the spine; a practical review of methods of chiropractic terminology (e.g., listings); and a synthesis of static and motion palpation procedures and techniques. Demonstration and practice sessions will be given, utilizing various adjustive and manipulative interventions for treating subluxation in the pelvic area.

Prequisites: CHR-600l, CHR-650L

1
CHR 650L

Adjustive Techniques I Lab

This course will present contemporary theories of chiropractic science and practice related to the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of spinal dysfunction. Theory of segmental dysfunction, outcome measures of dysfunction, theory of facilitation, and clinical management of spinal dysfunction across the age continuum will be included. The student will be introduced to a cross referencing approach to treatment of the vertebral subluxation complex utilizing the diversified technique, Palmer-Gonstead, orthogonality, and the motion-spatial / fixation concept. The course will review current research related to somatovisceral influences and their associated pathophysiology and neurodystrophy. The clinical laboratory will comprise an integration of biomechanics and physical assessment skills, with emphasis on the spine; a practical review of methods of chiropractic terminology (e.g., listings); and a synthesis of static and motion palpation procedures and techniques. Demonstration and practice sessions will be given, utilizing various adjustive and manipulative interventions for treating subluxation in the pelvic area.

Prequisites: CHR-650, CHR-600L

2
CHR 651

Adjustive Techniques II

This course will present contemporary theories of chiropractic science and practice related to the assessment diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of spinal dysfunction. Theory of segmental dysfunction, outcome measures of dysfunction, theory of facilitation, and clinical management of spinal dysfunction across the age continuum will be included. The student will be introduced to a cross referencing approach to treatment of the vertebral subluxation complex utilizing the diversified technique, Palmer-Gonstead, orthogonality, and the motion-spatial / fixation concept. The course will review current research related to somatovisceral influences and their associated pathophysiology and neurodystrophy. The clinical laboratory will comprise an integration of biomechanics and physical assessment skills, with emphasis on the spine; a practical review of methods of chiropractic terminology (e.g., listings); and a synthesis of static and motion palpation procedures and techniques with both dynajust and force plate teaching/ evaluations. Demonstration and practice sessions will be given, utilizing various adjustive and manipulative interventions for treating subluxation in the lumbar and pelvic areas.

Prequisites: CHR-650 CHR-650L, CHR-651L

2
CHR 651L

Adjustive Techniques II Lab

This course will present contemporary theories of chiropractic science and practice related to the assessment diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of spinal dysfunction. Theory of segmental dysfunction, outcome measures of dysfunction, theory of facilitation, and clinical management of spinal dysfunction across the age continuum will be included.The student will be introduced to a cross referencing approach to treatment of the vertebral subluxation complex utilizing the diversified technique, Palmer-Gonstead, orthogonality, and the motion-spatial / fixation concept. The course will review current research related to somatovisceral influences and their associated pathophysiology and neurodystrophy. The clinical laboratory will comprise an integration of biomechanics and physical assessment skills, with emphasis on the spine; a practical review of methods of chiropractic terminology (e.g., listings); and a synthesis of static and motion palpation procedures and techniques with both dynajust and force plate teaching/ evaluations. Demonstration and practice sessions will be given, utilizing various adjustive and manipulative interventions for treating subluxation in the lumbar and pelvic areas.

Prequisites: CHR-650 CHR-650L, CHR-651

0
CHR 652

Adjustive Techniques III

This course will present contemporary theories of chiropractic science and practice related to the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of spinal dysfunction. Theory of segmental dysfunction, outcome measures of dysfunction, theory of facilitation, and clinical management of spinal dysfunction across the age continuum will be included. The student will be introduced to a cross referencing approach to treatment of the vertebral subluxation complex utilizing the diversified technique, Palmer-Gonstead, orthogonality, and the motion-spatial / fixation concept. The course will review current research related to somatovisceral influences and their associated pathophysiology and neurodystrophy. The clinical laboratory will comprise an integration of biomechanics and physical assessment skills, with emphasis on the spine; a practical review of methods of chiropractic terminology (e.g., listings); and a synthesis of static and motion palpation procedures and techniques with both dynajust and force plate teaching/ evaluations. Demonstration and practice sessions will be given, utilizing various adjustive and manipulative interventions for treating subluxation in the pelvic, lumbar, and thoracic areas.

Prequisites: CHR-651 CHR-651L, CHR-652L

1
CHR 652L

Adjustive Techniques III Lab

This course will present contemporary theories of chiropractic science and practice related to the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation of spinal dysfunction. Theory of segmental dysfunction, outcome measures of dysfunction, theory of facilitation, and clinical management of spinal dysfunction across the age continuum will be included. The student will be introduced to a cross referencing approach to treatment of the vertebral subluxation complex utilizing the diversified technique, Palmer-Gonstead, orthogonality, and the motion-spatial / fixation concept. The course will review current research related to somatovisceral influences and their associated pathophysiology and neurodystrophy. The clinical laboratory will comprise an integration of biomechanics and physical assessment skills, with emphasis on the spine; a practical review of methods of chiropractic terminology (e.g., listings); and a synthesis of static and motion palpation procedures and techniques with both dynajust and force plate teaching/ evaluations. Demonstration and practice sessions will be given, utilizing various adjustive and manipulative interventions for treating subluxation in the pelvic, lumbar, and thoracic areas.

Prequisites: None

1
CHR 653

Adjustive Techniques IV

This course will build on the process of assessment, treatment analysis & adjustive techniques of CHR 631, 650, 651, and 652. The course content reflects a synthesis of biomechanics, orthopedic testing, orthopedic diagnosis, and adjustive/ manipulative procedures for the spine and the pelvic region. Emphasis will be placed on examining various spinal conditions, including those conditions resulting from spinal trauma. Additionally, the student will learn about orthotics, taping and soft tissue techniques utilized to treat conditions of the spine across the age continuum. Clinical laboratory experience will be divided into two sections: Section I will emphasize the cervical and thoracic orthopedic tests. All sections will continue with a selective review and practice of various manipulative and adjustive techniques covered in earlier courses with both dynajust and force plate evaluations. The use of orthotic devices, taping, and procedures for treating various spinal conditions will be discussed and demonstrated.

Prequisites: CHR-652 CHR-652L, CHR-653L CHR-655 and CHR-655L

4
CHR 653L

Adjustive Techniques IV Lab

This lab is consistant with material covered in lectures in Chr 653. Clinical laboratory experience will be divided into two sections; section I will emphasize the cervical and thoracic orthopedic tests. All sections will continue with a selective review and practice of various manipulative and adjustive techniques covered in earlier courses with both dynajust and force plate evaluations. The use of orthotic devices,taping,and procedures for treating various spinal conditions will be discussed and demonstrated.

Prequisites: CHR-652 CHR-652L, CHR-653

3
CHR

Two Electives from CHR 654 and CHR 654L or CHR 675 and CHR 675L

Choose two electives from CHR 654 and CHR 654L or CHR 675 and CHR 675L
7
CHR 655

Adjustive Techniques Vi

This course is a continuation of CHR 652. Course content will reflect a synthesis of biomechanics, orthopedic testing, musculoskeletal diagnosis, sports injuries, and adjustive/manipulative procedures across the age continuum with an emphasis on the extra spinal regions of the body. Clinical laboratory experience will be divided into two sections: Section I will emphasize orthopedic tests for the extremities. Section II will cover extremity-adjusting procedures, as well as evaluation and soft tissue methods used for the assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation for conditions involving the extremities. Additionally, the student will learn practical concepts regarding orthotic devices, taping and casting techniques for various extremity conditions.

Prequisites: CHR-653 CHR-653L

6
CHR 655L

Adjustive Techniques Vi Lab

This lab is consistant with material covered in lectures in Chr 655. Clinical laboratory experience will be divided into two sections: Section I will emphasize orthopedic tests for the extremities. Section II will cover extremity-adjusting procedures, as well as evaluation and soft tissue methods used for the assessment,diagnosis,treatment,and evaluation for conditions involving the extremities. Additionally,the student will learn practical concepts regarding orthotic devices,taping and casting techniques for various extremity conditions.

Prequisites: CHR-653 CHR-653L

1
CHR 657

Applied Neurology

This course is concerned with human neurology, both biochemical and physiologic. Content will focus on the cardinal manifestations of neurological disease; growth and development of the nervous system; the neurology of aging; and the pathology, symptomatology, and diagnostic testing for major categories of neurological disease, including disease of the spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscles. In addition, the course will include an introduction of related psychiatric disorders, the interpretation of electrodiagnosis, and a review of current research literature and the need for evidence-based research. Laboratory sessions will include demonstration and practice in performing various neurological tests.

Prequisites: CHR-640 CHR-656

3
CHR 657L

Applied Neurology Lab

this lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 657.

Prequisites: CHR-656

2
CHR 661

Diagnostic Imaging I

This course will introduce the student to diagnostic imaging as an assessment tool used in the development of a comprehensive patient profile. The dual focus of this course will be on the physics and processes involved in radiographic techniques and normal radiographic anatomy. The course will provide instruction concerning radiographic physics and processes involved in the use of the x-ray machine including image receptor equipment, factor calculation, and film processing and storage. The effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, and Federal and state safety guidelines regulating the use of x-rays will be examined. The cost/benefit ratio of utilizing imaging and its relative value as a diagnostic tool will be examined. Radiographic interpretation instruction will include the normal radiological anatomy of the spine, viscera, and the extremities.

Prequisites: BIO-639, CHR-661L

3
CHR 661L

Diagnostic Imaging Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 661.

Prequisites: BIO-639, CHR-661

1
CHR 662

Diagnostic Imaging II

This course will build on the knowledge gained in Diagnostic Imaging I. Utilizing conventional radiographs, focus will be on recognizing bone pathologies and selected variants of the spine and extremities. Imaging results will be correlated with patient history, physical examination, and laboratory findings. A regional approach will be utilized to explore neoplastic, infectious diseases; metabolic, skeletal dysplasias; hematological and nutritional disorders; as well as degenerative, inflammatory, and metabolic arthritides and trauma. The need for appropriate case management will be emphasized. Laboratory experience will include continuing demonstration and practice of the use of x-ray equipment, positioning techniques, and imaging interpretation for the accurate identification of pathological processes.

Prequisites: CHR-661 CHR-661L, CHR-662L

4
CHR 662L

Diagnostic Imaging II Lab

This course will build on the knowledge gained in Diagnostic Imaging I. Utilizing conventional radiographs, focus will be on recognizing bone pathologies and selected variants of the spine and extremities. Imaging results will be correlated with patient history, physical examination, and laboratory findings. A regional approach will be utilized to explore neoplastic, infectious diseases; metabolic, skeletal dysplasias; hematological and nutritional disorders; as well as degenerative, inflammatory, and metabolic arthritides and trauma. The need for appropriate case management will be emphasized. Laboratory experience will include continuing demonstration and practice of the use of x-ray equipment, positioning techniques, and imaging interpretation for the accurate identification of pathological processes.

Prequisites: CHR-661 CHR-661L, CHR-662

3
CHR 663

Diagnostic Imaging III

This course will place an emphasis on the importance of correlation of radiographic findings with the patient history, physical examination, and related laboratory findings. The need for case management,including appropriate referral and follow-up for patients experiencing certain medical conditions or pathologies as listed in the syllabus, will be studied.Part 1: The focus of this portion of the course will be the use of advanced specialized imaging techniques with an emphasis on the spine and musculoskeletal system. Topics will include magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, myelography, discography, radionuclide imaging, and bone densitometry. Additionally, the course will present information about digital storage and retrieval of radiographic findings and the use of computer-assisted diagnostic programs.Part 2: The focus of this portion of the course will be interpreting diagnostic images of the abdomen with an emphasis on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings. Content will cover predominantly abdominal calcifications and major diseases affecting the abdominal organs that may be encountered in a chiropractic office.Part 3: The focus of this portion of the course will be interpreting diagnostic images of the chest with an emphasis on the differentiation between normal and abnormal findings. Content will cover the following topics: diseases of the airways; diseases of the chest including cavities, cysts, lesions, and calcification; pulmonary and circulatory diseases; thoracic neoplasms; and generalized radiographic findings of various internal organs.

Prequisites: CHR-662 CHR-662L, CHR-663L

4
CHR 663L

Diagnostic Imaging III Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 663.

Prequisites: CHR-662 CHR-662L, CHR-663

3
CHR 664

Diagnostic Imaging IV

This capstone course will review and reinforce the knowledge gained in Diagnostic Imaging II. Utilizing conventional radiographs and advanced imaging, focus will be on recognizing bone pathologies and selected variants of the spine and extremities based on a regional anatomic case-based approach. Imaging results will correlate patient history, physical examination, and laboratory findings with neoplastic, infectious, metabolic and dysplastic disorders as well as degenerative, inflammatory, and metabolic arthritis and skeletal injury. The need for a systematic approach to case management will be emphasized.Laboratory experience will include review of many representative cases.

Prequisites: CHR-663 CHR-663L, CHR-664L

4
CHR 664L

Diagnostic Imaging IV Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 664. Laboratory experience will include review of many representative cases.

Prequisites: CHR-663 CHR-663L, CHR-664

0
CHR 665

Diagnostic Imaging V

This course will introduce the student to radiographic positioning. Instruction will emphasize the optimal procedures in positioning to produce radiographic images that demonstrate radiological anatomy of the spine, viscera, and the extremities. The principles of radiographic positioning and federal and state safety guidelines regulating the use of x-rays will be examined. Laboratory experience includes demonstration of the proper and safe use of equipment and positioning techniques.

Prequisites: CHR-661 CHR-661L, CHR-665L

2
CHR 665L

Diagnostic Imaging V Lab

This lab is consistent with material covered in lectures in Chr 665. Laboratory experience includes demonstration of the proper and safe use of equipment and positioning techniques.

Prequisites: CHR-661 CHR-661L, CHR-655

1
CHR 656

Clinical Neuroscience

An in-depth study of the neuroscience of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Clinical conditions and case studies in neurology will be utilized. Laboratory includes examination of neural specimens. Four lecture hours, and two laboratory hours.

Prequisites: CHR-635, CHR-656L

4
CHR 656L

Clinical Neuroscience Lab

An in-depth study of the neuroscience of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Clinical conditions and case studies in neurology will be utilized. Laboratory includes examination of neural specimens. Four lecture hours, and two laboratory hours.

Prequisites: CHR-635, CHR-657

1
CHR 679L

Special Topics Lab



Prequisites: None

0
Requirements

Performance Qualifications

Physical Requirements:

Students should have adequate physical abilities, strength, and coordination necessary for appropriate execution of procedures related to patient care.

Sensory Requirements:

Students must have the ability to utilize sensory information as necessary and appropriate toward the acquisition, analysis, and integration of knowledge as follows:

Visual

  • ability to utilize visual observational skills, whether in the laboratory, classroom, or clinical setting, to the degree of being able to inspect a patient, use diagnostic instruments such as an otoscope and ophthalmoscope, interpret radiographs and other diagnostic images, and be able to accurately discern discolorations of the skin.

Auditory

  • capacity to acquire information through auditory-based systems such as auscultation and percussion.

Touch

  • ability to make determinations through palpation.

Smell

  • ability to recognize that certain odors may be indicative of specific pathological conditions and to accurately identify odors and recognize the significance of a particular odor.

Technical Requirements:

Cognitive

  • ability to acquire, assess, analyze, and integrate information in varying settings and situations.
  • ability to conceptualize three dimensional objects and their relationship to related structures and/or function.
  • capacity to problem solve and to appropriately utilize knowledge and skill sets in novel situations.
  • ability to demonstrate professionalism, decorum, and sound judgment as expected of a physician.

Communication

  • have the ability to effectively communicate with individuals, notably patients, towards the objective of gathering and disseminating information.
  • skill set necessary for clear, articulate, and coherent communication, including verbal and written with all involved individuals including other practitioners, faculty, and patients.
Regulations

Academic Regulations

Good Academic Standing

To be in good academic standing for the doctor of chiropractic program, students must:

  1. Maintain a cumulative graduate GPA of 2.50, and
  2. Earn minimum grades of C or S in all courses required for the doctor of chiropractic program,* and
  3. Not earn three or more grades of U and/or below a C while enrolled in the chiropractic program, and
  4. Not withdraw from the same course more than once, and
  5. Not withdraw from more than three classes (other than in the case of an approved leave of absence) while enrolled in the chiropractic program, and
  6. Complete the doctor of chiropractic program within five calendar years from the date of matriculation into the professional doctor of chiropractic program.

*Courses with a grade below C or grades of U must be repeated, but may only be repeated once.

Academic Probation

Students who are not in good academic standing will be placed on academic probation during their next full-time trimester.

Dismissal

Students will be dismissed from the chiropractic program if they:

  1. Fail to remain in good academic standing while on academic probation or after having been on academic probation during a previous trimester.

National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) or the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board (CCEB) Test
All students in the doctor of chiropractic program are required to pass NBCE Part 1 in its entirety prior to entry into the clinical phase of their education. Canadian students have the option of taking the CCEB part A examination in lieu of the NBCE part 1 examination. These students must provide documentation directly from CCEB that they achieved a passing score on the CCEB part A examination prior to entry into their externship.

Disclaimer

Due to the continuing development of policies and curriculum for the department of chiropractic at the printing of this catalog: the department of chiropractic reserves the right to change and enforce said policies and curriculum post publication of this catalog. Students should contact the executive director of chiropractic programs for the most up to date information concerning the program and its policies.

Appeals

To appeal a decision rendered by the School of Health Professions faculty/administration that has academic consequences, you must follow the appeal procedures which are available at www.dyc.edu/appeals.

Admissions

Admission Requirements

The doctor of chiropractic program (DCP) admits students whose goals, abilities, and character are consistent with the DCP’s mission, and who have completed a baccalaureate degree at an institution(s) accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or an equivalent foreign agency with a G.P.A. for these 90 hours of not less than 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

The 90 hours will include a minimum of 24 semester hours in life and physical science courses. Students must also have completed coursework in the following: biology, general chemistry, organic chemistry, and physics. These science courses will provide an adequate background for success in the DCP, and at least half of these courses will have a substantive laboratory component. The student’s undergraduate preparation also includes a well-rounded general education program in the humanities and social sciences, and other coursework deemed relevant by the DCP for students to successfully complete the DCP curriculum.

A life science includes any branch of science that studies living organisms, their organization, life processes, and relationships to their environment. This would include areas of study such as, biology, ecology, medicine, anthropology, anatomy, physiology, microbiology and other similar areas of study. A physical science includes any branch of science that studies the nature and properties of energy and nonliving matter. This would include areas of study such as, physics, chemistry, astronomy, mathematics, statistics, and geology. Included in the list of acceptable science classes are those that combine these areas of study such as kinesiology, exercise science and biomechanics.

Students who have a G.P.A. for these 90 hours of 2.75-2.99 or who have less than 24 semester hours in life and physical sciences will be considered for admission on an individual basis, and if accepted into the DCP, will be placed on a mandatory term-by-term tracking program designed to maximize their success in the program.

Students who have prior graduate level coursework must demonstrate a minimum 2.5 graduate G.P.A. in order to be considered for admission into the DCP. Students who have been dismissed from a chiropractic program at other institutions will not be considered for admission to the D’Youville College doctor of chiropractic program.

Students Admitted to the D.C.P. From International Institutions

Each student admitted to begin the D.C.P. on the basis of academic credentials from institutions outside the United States must meet the following requirements:

  1. Provide evidence of proficiency in reading and writing in the English language, and an understanding of oral communication in English.
  2. Demonstrate academic preparation equivalent to that possessed by beginning students admitted from United States institutions.
  3. Provide evidence of proficiency in the subject matter of each course for which credits are accepted.
  4. Provide evidence of having financial resources sufficient to complete at least one full year of full-time attendance in the D.C.P. e) Meet all applicable legal requirements for study in the United States.

Transfer Policies

Students Transferring from Another Institution or Seeking Advanced Standing Each student transferring credits applicable to the D.C.P. must meet the following requirements:

  1. The applicant for transfer from another doctor of chiropractic program (D.C.P.) must meet the prerequisite admissions requirements detailed above.
  2. Credits considered for transfer must have been awarded for courses taken in a D.C.P. accredited by the CCE or in a program accredited as a first professional degree in one of the health sciences by another nationally recognized accrediting agency, or in a graduate program in an academic discipline closely related to the health sciences offered by an institution which is recognized by a national accrediting agency.
  3. Only credits recorded on an official transcript of the issuing institution with an equivalent grade of 2.00 on a 4.00 scale or better will be considered for transfer. Courses recording a grade of “pass”, “satisfactory”, or equivalent will not be considered for transfer credit.
  4. Credits accepted for transfer must be determined to be substantially equivalent to courses offered by D’Youville.
  5. Credits accepted for transfer must have been awarded within five years of the date of admission, except that D’Youville may at its discretion, accept older credits if the entering student holds an earned professional degree in one of the health sciences (e.g., D.C., MD, DO, DDS, DPM) or a graduate degree in an academic discipline closely related to the health sciences.
  6. Credits accepted for transfer from institutions outside the United States must be accompanied by evidence of the individual student’s proficiency in the subject matter of each course for which credits are accepted. Students may be required to take a screening examination to demonstrate such proficiency prior to transfer credit being awarded.
  7. Transfer students must complete all of the internship requirements at DYC.
  8. Transfer students may not transfer more than 50 percent of chiropractic specific courses.
  9. Transfer students must earn not less than 25 percent of the total credits required for the D.C. degree from D’Youville College.
Department

Chiropractic Department

The doctor of chiropractic program (D.C.P.) leads to a first professional degree. The curriculum concentrates on specialized chiropractic skills and application of research methodologies to evidence-based practice. It encompasses class work, labs and clinical rotations over a period of 11 semesters. Internship and externship experiences include a total of 35 hours per week at a variety of clinical settings including, but not limited to, the college’s clinics, externships, placement in community-based institutions, hospital rotations, and private practices.

The program is approved by the New York Board of Regents and is registered with the New York State Education Department. The doctor of chiropractic degree program at D'Youville College is awarded programmatic accreditation by the:

Council on Chiropractic Education
8049 North 85th Way
Scottsdale, AZ, 85258-4321

Tel: (480) 433-8877
Website: www.cce-usa.org.

Individuals with complaints about compliance of the program with the CCE Standards should be directed to the CCE at the above address. Students who successfully complete the doctor of chiropractic program are eligible to sit for the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners (NBCE) and the Canadian Chiropractic Examining Board (CCEB) licensure examinations. Graduates who pass the NBCE examinations may apply for licensure in all states. Students are advised that some states may have additional or special requirements that must be met in order to obtain licensure in that state. For example, some states currently require a baccalaureate degree in addition to a doctor of chiropractic degree to apply for licensure. In some cases, the baccalaureate degree must be earned prior to entering the chiropractic program. In other cases, the baccalaureate degree may be earned concurrently with the doctor of chiropractic degree. Individual state requirements for chiropractic licensure are subject to change. New York state requires specific undergraduate courses and green card/citizenship in order to qualify for New York state licensure. Please see www.nysed.gov for specifics.