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Minors

Paola Kersch teaching Spanish class

Supplement your skills, pursue a passion, or complement your major with vital knowledge to stand out to employers by adding an academic minor.

A college minor offers students an opportunity to broaden their learning experience. Have a focused career path in sight? Choose a minor that will separate you from your peers in the minds of future employers. Passionate about a topic besides your major? Expand your knowledge and develop your understanding of the subject.

Academic Minors (A-to-Z List):

Accounting (12 credit hours)

Accounting Minor (12 credit hours)

The accounting minor is a useful complement to a major in management or general business. Like the other structured minors, it offers greater employment potential. It is particularly useful to someone working in or operating a small business.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ACC 211

Principles of Accounting I

This is a foundation course dealing with accounting principles and procedures with emphasis on the entire accounting cycle, special journals,control accounts and subsidiary ledgers.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
ACC 212

Principles of Accounting II

This course explores theory and applies accounting principles mastered in ACC 211 and accounting for general partnerships and corporations. It also deals with managerial accounting, including accounting cycles, cost analysis, and budgeting
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: ACC-211

3.0
ACC 311

Intermediate Accounting I

This is a detailed study of financial statement items and special corporation problems. Problems emphasize analytical approaches to typical accounting situations and approved methods for full disclosure of financial information.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: ACC-212

3.0
ACC 3XX

One Elective from ACC 312 or ACC 321

Choose one elective from ACC 312 or ACC 321
3
Total 12

Analytics (23 credit hours)

Analytics Minor (23 Credit Hours)

The analytics minor is a useful complement to majors in health or natural sciences. Like other structured minors, it offers greater employment potential.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prerequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course from PHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L or be a pre-pharmacy student.

4.0
MAT 124

Intermediate Applied Statistics

This course continues and expands the material present in MAT 123. The course will cover hypothesis testing for variances, symmetric versus asymmetric distributions, non-parametric methods for one, two or multiple samples, measures of association, multifactor analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. The material focuses on the application of known methods. Large data sets will be employed to explore the methods presented in class. The course will employ one of SPSS, MINITAB or SAS.

Prerequisites: MAT-123 with a minimum grade of C.

4.0
MAT 220

Applied Regression Analysis

The course covers the ideas behind, application of, and evaluation of regression processes, which are used to explore the relationships between variables. This course will cover simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, regression diagnostics, use of qualitative variables as predictors, transformations of variables, collinear data, and logistical regression. The material focuses on the application of known methods. Large data sets will be employed to explore the methods presented in class. The course will employ one of SPSS, MINITAB, or SAS.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: MAT-124 and achieve a minimum grade of C.

3.0
MAT 222

Statistical Computing

Students will learn about various types of relational database programs and understand the fundamental aspects of SQL (Structured Query Language). This course covers database concepts, design concepts, database administration, and web-based databases. Students will receive an introduction to the SAS programming language with a focus on manipulation, summarizing, and basic statistical analysis of large data sets.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Mat-123 and achieve a minimum grade of C, 1 CSC course - CSC-151 is prefered.

3.0
MAT 224

Biostatistics

This course provides an introduction to common experimental designs in the health sciences, such as clinical trials, case-control studies, and cohort studies, and the statistical methods used in those studies, including odds ratios, relative risk, logistic regression, longitudinal analysis, and survival analysis. Emphasis is placed on practical data analysis in biology and medicine. The course will employ one of SPSS, MINITAB or SAS.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Mat-220 and achieve a minimum grade of C

3.0
MAT 228

Applied Statistical Inquiry

The course will cover the process of statistical inquiry, including defining the problem, hypotheses development, selection of appropriate variables, test selection, interpretation of results, and reporting of conclusions. Large data sets will be employed to explore the methods presented in class. Group projects and oral presentations will simulate real life job experiences in the analytics industry. This course will employ one of SPSS, MINITAB or SAS.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Mat-220 Mat-222 Mat-224 and achieve a minimum grade of C

3.0
CSC XXX

One Elective — CSC 151 is recommended

Choose one elective from CSC courses. CSC 151 is recommended.
3
Total 23

Anatomy (21 credit hours)

Anatomy Minor (Minimum of 21 Credit Hours)

The anatomy minor is designed for those who want an in-depth knowledge of the human body. A more thorough knowledge of anatomy will give students that plan a career in the health sciences, research or education a solid background in the anatomical sciences.

Select one of the two introductory sequences:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
Total 8

OR

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
Total 8

Required courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 317

Comparative Anatomy

This is a study of vertebrates and their chordate origins, including an overview emphasizing their historical relationships. The major systems, such as integument, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, and skeletal, are presented with examples from the major vertebrate groups. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317L, (BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 317L

Comparative Anatomy Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317

0.0
BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will take BIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6.0
BIO 339L

Gross Anat Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-339

0.0
BIO 3XX

One Elective from BIO 304 w/Lab or BIO 389*

Choose one elective (BIO 304 and corresponding lab count as one) BIO 304BIO 304L or BIO 389 
3-4
BIO 4XX

One elective from BIO 499, BIO 407, or BIO 408

Choose one elective from BIO 499BIO 407, or BIO 408
1-2
Total 14-16

*Course BIO 389 can only be taken with permission of the chair.

Bioinformatics (21 credit hours)

Bioinformatics Minor (Minimum of 21 Credit Hours)

The bioinformatics minor provides students who have an interest in computation and biology the opportunity to explore this rapidly developing field while simultaneously exposing these students to additional coursework in math and computing.

Due to the prerequisite coursework required for these courses, it is expected that most students will simultaneously seek a bachelor of science degree in biology, mathematics, or chemistry.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CSC 151

Introduction to Programming I

This is an introduction to computer programming using a modern language: program structure, procedures, functions, loops, if-then-else, arrays and records.

Prerequisites: MAT-101 or achieve a placement test score indicating mastery of the MAT-101 material.

3.0
CSC 152

Introduction to Programming II



Prerequisites: CSC-151

3.0
MAT 124

Intermediate Applied Statistics

This course continues and expands the material present in MAT 123. The course will cover hypothesis testing for variances, symmetric versus asymmetric distributions, non-parametric methods for one, two or multiple samples, measures of association, multifactor analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. The material focuses on the application of known methods. Large data sets will be employed to explore the methods presented in class. The course will employ one of SPSS, MINITAB or SAS.

Prerequisites: MAT-123 with a minimum grade of C.

4.0
BIO 375

Math Modeling in Biology

Techniques for expressing biological molecules and concepts as mathematical expressions for analysis and comparison.

Prerequisites: MAT-125 and (BIO-102 or BIO-303), 1 computer science (CSC or IT) course. CSC-151 or IT-111 is recommended.

3.0
BIO 350

Fund of Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics

This course will offer an introduction into the novel disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, providing students with a solid intellectual framework for understanding biological pathways, networks and molecular systems in an integrated, multidisciplinary fashion. The course will follow an interactive, problem-based instructional approach, using several mathematics exercises that utilize statistical and probability calculations to add quantitative rigor to the interpretation of biological data sets. The course will be based on case studies taken from scientific publications and Internet-based bioinformatics tools will be used for data analysis. The content will include all major areas of biology, including DNA and protein sequences, microarrays, and systems biology.

Prerequisites: BIO-303 and MAT-125., any CSC (Computer Science) course., BIO-350L

3.0
BIO 351

Computational Biology

Description of BIO 351 should be same as the printed catalog: This course and required lab are intended to serve as an introduction to the problems encountered in modern biology research, with a special focus on the usage of modern computer-dependent techniques to explain biological phenomena. Many modern biological studies are hindered by the sheer volume of experimental data produced. These data often cannot be efficiently or accurately interpreted without computer assistance, yet many scientists lack the necessary skill set to do so. This course will instruct students in the challenges of designing, implementing and analyzing in vivo or in vitro generated experimental results using in silico techniques. This will be accomplished through a project-based learning format. This course requires three hours of lecture a week and a weekly three hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO/CHE-303 or permission of the instructor., BIO-351L

4.0
BIO 351L

Computational Biology Lab

Lab to accompany BIO 351

Prerequisites: BIO-351

0.0
BIO 499

Capstone Experience

This course is designed to be a capstone experience in the form of a research experience, internship/practical experience, or service learning experience.
1-2
Total 21-22

Biology (18 credit hours)

Biology Minor (Minimum of 18 Credit Hours)

Any D’Youville student not seeking a degree in biology could complete this minor. It could be used by those who wish to feature a biology foundation in their resumes.

Two Introductory Courses with Labs:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
Total 8

OR

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
Total 8

Three courses (a minimum of 10 credits) from:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO -107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 216

Marine Biology

This is an introduction to the life of the seas. It begins with basic information about the chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. All major marine communities are surveyed, Including coastal zones and estuaries, coral reefs, the open ocean and the exotic communities of the deep sea. Extra attention is given to special topics of particular importance or interest. The final section concerns human interactions with the marine world and threats that they pose to it.

Prerequisites: BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 218

Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on their diverse patterns of form and function. Coverage of each group includes its distinguishing characteristics and patterns of adaptations for coping with the needs of life by following examples of selected species. Basic biological principles and special impacts on humans are discussed when appropriate. In the laboratory, live and preserved specimens from marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats are used to explore aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-218L

4.0
BIO 218L

Invertebrate Zoology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-218

0.0
BIO 229

Ecology

This is a broad introduction to the basic concepts of ecology as they pertain to population, evolutionary processes, communities and ecosystems. Several current environmental problems are explored in the light of these concepts. Laboratory includes a mix of lab and field exercises designed to put lecture topics into practice. The course consists of three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-229L

4.0
BIO 229L

Ecology Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-229

0.0
BIO 230

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230L

4.0
BIO 230L

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230

0.0
BIO 231

Environmental Geology

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resources, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231L

4.0
BIO 231L

Environmental Geology Lab

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resouces, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231

0.0
BIO 242

Evolution

Evolution is the single most unifying theory in the biological sciences. This course traces the beginnings of Darwinian-Wallace evolution by natural selection and places this theory in historical perspective. Current evidences of evolution are given and explained and evolution at the gene level is discussed. The emphasis of the course is on biological and biochemical adaptations to changing environments. Some limited treatment of population genetics is included.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 3XX

One 300-level elective

Choose one 300-level elective BIO course
3
BIO 4XX

One 400-level elective

Choose one 400-level elective BIO course
3
Total 10

*Minimum of 18 credit hours for a Biology Minor.

Business (18 credit hours)

Business Minor (18 Credit Hours)

The minor in general business provides courses in accounting, management and economics. Liberal arts majors and those working with small businesses will find this minor helpful. This minor is available only to students who are not accounting and/or management majors.

Required courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ACC 211

Principles of Accounting I

This is a foundation course dealing with accounting principles and procedures with emphasis on the entire accounting cycle, special journals,control accounts and subsidiary ledgers.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
ACC 212

Principles of Accounting II

This course explores theory and applies accounting principles mastered in ACC 211 and accounting for general partnerships and corporations. It also deals with managerial accounting, including accounting cycles, cost analysis, and budgeting
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: ACC-211

3.0
ECO 201

Macroeconomics

This course explores the price system, public and private sectors, national income accounting, unemployment and inflation, fiscal policy, budget deficits and the public debt, money and banking and the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. This course meets the social sciences requirement in the core.
Offered in: Fall and Summer
Prerequisites: None

3.0
ECO 202

Microeconomics

This course explores supply and demand and the elasticity of supply and demand. It analyzes the degree and nature of competition in various market structures, the economic benefits derived from and the problems presented by big business conglomerates and multinationals and international trade and finance. The course meets the social sciences requirement in the core.
Offered in: Spring and Summer
Prerequisites: None

3.0
ECO 207

Statistics

This is a general course to acquaint students with the elements and procedures of statistics. It includes the basic concept of statistical methods and analysis, and functional use of descriptive and inferential statistical tools.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
MGT/MKT

One Elective from MGT 305 or MKT 304

Choose one elective from MGT 305 or MKT 304
3
Total 18

Chemistry (23 credit hours)

Chemistry Minor (23 Credit Hours)

A structured minor in chemistry may be taken by students who are interested in enhancement of their credentials (especially students enrolled in majors already carrying chemistry requirements, e.g., biology).

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
CHE 220

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 219. The physical properties, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of aromatic rings, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Amines, carboxylic acids and its derivatives, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromaticity and enols are studied. The theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spec) methods are also covered.

Prerequisites: CHE-219, CHE-220L

3.0
CHE 220L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

This lab emphasizes the reactions that are covered in lecture such as, but not limited to, ester synthesis, electrophilic substitution of an aromatic ring, Grignard reagents and reduction of carbonyl compounds. This lab also places an importance on mastering spectroscopic methods such as IR and NMR utilizing in-house instrumentation. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-219L, CHE-220

1.0
CHE 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition.

Prerequisites: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), CHE-303L

3.0
CHE 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports the CHE 303 lecture course. Students required to take CHE 303 are also required to take CHE 303L (except for physician assistant students).

Prerequisites: CHE-303

1.0
Total 20

Select one of the following:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE 311

Physical Chemistry I

This is the first semester of the introductory course in Physical chemistry. Areas of study include statistical thermodynamics:Maxwell Boltzmann distribution partition function,thermodynamics functions,ideal gases,Einstein solid;spectroscopy:interaction of light with matter,Einstein coefficients,selection rules,atomic and molecular spectra,lasers;kinetics,rates,microscopic reversibility,steady state,collision theory.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: CHE-101 CHE-102 MAT-125

3.0
CHE 312

Physical Chemistry II

This is the second semester of the introductory course in physical chemistry. Areas of study include quantum mechanics: history, Bohr atom, Schrodinger Equation, particle in a box, rigid rotor, simple harmonic Oscillator, hydrogen atom, MO theory; classical thermodynamics: Gibbs chemical potential, phase equilibria electrochemistry, irreversible processes. This is the second semester of the introductory course in physical chemistry. Areas of study include chemical kinetics, enzyme kinetics, electrochemistry, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, spectroscopy, molecular modeling and the chemical bond.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: CHE-312L, CHE-101, 102 MAT-125

3.0
CHE 351

Medicinal Chemistry

This course will survey the relationships between organic chemistry, biochemistry, and physiology in the design and discovery of drugs. Strategies in optimizing drug-target interactions will be examined in select drug classes (e.g. NSAIDS, adrenergic agonists/antagonists).
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: CHE-219 CHE-219L, CHE-303 CHE-303L

3.0
CHE 412

Spectroscopy

This is a one-semester course in the fundaments of spectroscopy. This course will cover ultra-violet spectrometry, mass spectrometry, infrared spectrometry, proton (H) magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry, 13C NMR spectrometry,correlation spectrometry (1H-J1 COSY AND 1-13c COSTY) and spectrometry of other important nuclei (e.g., 19F and 31P) to aid in the elucidation and structural confirmation of a wide variety of organic molecules and/or biologically relevant molecules
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102 CHE-102L CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L CHE-303 CHE-303L

3.0
CHE 421

Survey of Organometallic Chemistry

This is an introductory survey course in organometallic chemistry, which combines organic chemistry with inorganic chemistry. The course will include a general overview of the basics of organometallic chemistry, Topics include properties of ligands, bonding, oxidative addition, reductive eliminations, insertions, hydroformylation, C-H functionalization, olefin metathesis, gold catalysis, current research and industrial processes.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: CHE-219 CHE-219L, CHE-220 CHE-220L

3.0
Total 3

Other courses may be taken with departmental approval.

English: Literature (15 credit hours)

English Minor in Literature (15 Credit Hours)

A minor in English literature offers students in other majors the opportunity to broaden their knowledge of literature and its diverse genres, perspectives, and historical and political contexts. The distribution of coursework enables students to enrich their experience of literature by engaging with diverse works of cultural and aesthetic value, contending with important philosophical questions, reimagining histories of past times and places, and fostering their own critical and creative voices.

Minors are encouraged to participate in the larger culture of the English program — e.g., scholarly lectures, readings, roundtables — and to work for the college’s literary magazine, Sketch.

Course requirements for the minor in English literature:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG 237

Introduction to Literary Criticism

This course will provide students with the necessary skills to work consciously and effectively within the discourse of the discipline. Emphasis will be given to the following: further refinement of close critical reading skills; understanding of literary terms; understanding of basic critical and theoretical terms, concepts and methodologies; and understanding of genres.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: ENG-111

3.0
ENG 2XX

One 200-level Elective

Choose one 200-level course.
3
ENG XXX

Three 300-400 level Literature Electives

Choose three electives: 300-400 level Literature courses.
9
Total 15

English: Writing and New Media (15 credit hours)

English Minor in Writing and New Media (15 Credit Hours)

A minor in writing and new media helps students establish the communication skills and visual, information, and media literacies required in professional and academic environments. The writing and new media minor consists of 12-course credits (4 courses) and a required internship (3-12 credits) with a writing or media-based focus. The internship will require a portfolio of work completed for the minor and/or a public performance / presentation.

Course requirements for the minor in writing and new media:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG 23X

One Elective from ENG 232 or ENG 231

Choose one elective from ENG 232 or ENG 231
3
ENG 23X

One Elective from ENG 235 or ENG 236

Choose one elective from ENG 235 or ENG 236
3
ENG 30X

One Elective from ENG 303, ENG 304 or ENG 305

Choose one elective from ENG 303, ENG 304 or ENG 305
3
INTERN

Internship with a writing or media-based focus

Internship with a writing or media-based focus
3-12
Total 12-21

 

Entrepreneurship (12 credit hours)

Entrepreneurship Minor (12 Credit Hours)

The purpose of the minor in entrepreneurship is to enable students to expand their skills and knowledge in small business/ practice management. The structured minor is designed to teach students managerial, financial and marketing concepts related to small business ownership.

The minor is geared toward students who may want to gain expertise in entrepreneurship/ small business management or want to own or manage a practice in the future. NOTE: The entrepreneurship structured minor is available only to non-management majors.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ACC 211

Principles of Accounting I

This is a foundation course dealing with accounting principles and procedures with emphasis on the entire accounting cycle, special journals,control accounts and subsidiary ledgers.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
MGT 305

Principles of Management

This course focuses on the nature and theory of management. It emphasizes the functional application of the basic principles of management to realistic business situations.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
MGT 321

Entrepreneurship 1

The course is a study of entrepreneurship in today’s small business or private practice environment. The student will be brought through the processes of starting and developing one’s own business or practice, from the original product or service concept through the birth and growth of the organization. The course will be presented in the context of applicable New York state law.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
MGT 323

Entrepreneurship II

Using skills acquired in MGT 321, students develop a formal business plan which includes marketing, management, financial and operational components of a business.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: MGT-321

3.0
Total 12

Environmental Sciences (23 credits)

Environmental Sciences Minor (Minimum of 23 Credit Hours)

This minor prepares students for continued graduate study in environmental science or to enter the workforce in government, industry, education, regulatory and consulting firms. Although this minor is not limited to chemistry and biology majors, they are likely the students that would take advantage of this opportunity. This minor will allow them to build on their interest in the environment without sacrificing the multitude of educational and career opportunities that their fundamental degrees provide.

Required Courses:

Choose from the following two sequences:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
Total 8

OR

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prerequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or be a chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3.0
BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303 lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prerequisites: BIO-303

1.0
Total 4
Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 230

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230L

4.0
BIO 230L

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230

0.0
BIO 231

Environmental Geology

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resources, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231L

4.0
BIO 231L

Environmental Geology Lab

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resouces, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231

0.0
CHE 331

Analytical Chemistry

This is a first course in analytical chemistry emphasizing the basic concepts and laboratory techniques underlying quantitative analysis including analysis of quantitative measurements, simple and complex solution equilibria, volumetric and gravimetric techniques, electrochemistry, redox and potentiometric titrations, separations, and elementary photometric techniques.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: CHE-102 CHE-102L

4.0
MNS 499

Capstone Experience

This course is designed to be a capstone experience in the form of a research experience, internship/practical experience, or service learning experience. Students enrolled in this course will usually be completing a structured minor. Through this course, the student will bring together knowledge and skills learned in coursework into an integrated project that will conclude in a paper and presentation of the student work.
0-2
Total 12-14

One of the following (with a corresponding lab counts as one):

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 216

Marine Biology

This is an introduction to the life of the seas. It begins with basic information about the chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. All major marine communities are surveyed, Including coastal zones and estuaries, coral reefs, the open ocean and the exotic communities of the deep sea. Extra attention is given to special topics of particular importance or interest. The final section concerns human interactions with the marine world and threats that they pose to it.

Prerequisites: BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 218

Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on their diverse patterns of form and function. Coverage of each group includes its distinguishing characteristics and patterns of adaptations for coping with the needs of life by following examples of selected species. Basic biological principles and special impacts on humans are discussed when appropriate. In the laboratory, live and preserved specimens from marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats are used to explore aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-218L

4.0
BIO 218L

Invertebrate Zoology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-218

0.0
BIO 229

Ecology

This is a broad introduction to the basic concepts of ecology as they pertain to population, evolutionary processes, communities and ecosystems. Several current environmental problems are explored in the light of these concepts. Laboratory includes a mix of lab and field exercises designed to put lecture topics into practice. The course consists of three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-229L

4.0
BIO 229L

Ecology Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-229

0.0
BIO 242

Evolution

Evolution is the single most unifying theory in the biological sciences. This course traces the beginnings of Darwinian-Wallace evolution by natural selection and places this theory in historical perspective. Current evidences of evolution are given and explained and evolution at the gene level is discussed. The emphasis of the course is on biological and biochemical adaptations to changing environments. Some limited treatment of population genetics is included.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 314

Botany

This course is a survey of biology of plants with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, physiology and the importance to man. This course is three lectures and three hours of lab.

Prerequisites: BIO-314L, BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

4.0
BIO 314L

Botany Lab

This course is three hours of lab.

Prerequisites: BIO-314

0.0
BIO 330

Environmental Microbiology

This course and required laboratory will focus on microbes, their biochemistry and their interactions with higher animals in specific ecologies. Microbes play a primary,and often overlooked, role in every ecosystem on Earth. The unique biochemistries of these microbes are responsible for a wealth of activities critical to human and planetary health,including oxygen generation,carbon and nitrogen bioavailability,bioremediation of pollutants, decomposition of organic matter,nutrient cycling and human sanitation. This course is not intended as the required course in a health sciences major as it eschews medical microbes in favor of environmentally or commercially important microorganisms. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Four (4) credits of college level chemistry., BIO-330L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L or (BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 330L

Environmental Microbiology Lab

This course and required Laboratory will focus on microbes, their biochemistry and their interactions with higher animals in specific ecologies. Microbes play a primary, and often overlooked, role in every ecosystem on Earth. The unique biochemistries of these microbes are responsible for a wealth of activities critical to human and planetary health, including; oxygen generation, carbon and nitrogen bioavailability, bioremediation of pollutants, decomposition of organic matter,nutrient cycling and human sanitation. This course is not intended as the required course a health sciences major as it eschews medical microbes in favor of environmentally or commercially important microorganisms. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and 3 hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO-330

0.0
BIO 331

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology combines ecology, physiology, molecular biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology in order to conserve biological diversity. It is the aim of conservation biology to understand the human threats to biodiversity and prevent any further loss. Topics covered will include, defining, measuring, and patterns of biodiversity, the negative effect of habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, over population, and over harvesting on biodiversity, strategies used to combat threats and sustain biodiversity and consideration of economic and ethical tradeoffs in the conservation of threatened species. Special attention will be paid to current issues related to biodiversity. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L and (BIO-102 BIO-102L or BIO-303 BIO-30L or CHE-303 CHE-303L), BIO-331L

4.0
BIO 331L

Conservation Biology Lab

Lab for BIO-331

Prerequisites: BIO-331

0.0
BIO 332

Environmental Health

Environmental health examines the impact of the environment on human health. This includes 1) the effect of environmental components, such as pollutants, pathogens, and toxins, on human health, 2) energy resource uses and its effect on human health, 3) food safety, 4) environmental hazards found in the work place, and 5) environmental degradation as it relates to human health and wellbeing. This course will also examine the methods of environmental assessment and the role of public policy related to environmental health.

Prerequisites: (CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102 CHE-102L) or (CHE-111 CHE-112 CHE-113), BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L

3.0
*BIO 389

Special Topics

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
*BIO 390

Special Topics

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 3-4

Minimum of 23 credit hours is required.

*Courses can be obtained by permission of the chair.

Exercise and Sports Studies (17 credit hours)

Exercise and Sport Studies Minor (17 Credit Hours)

The exercise and sports studies minor is designed to assist students in developing necessary knowledge, skills and abilities in the ever-growing field of health and fitness, as well as the burgeoning field of sport and competitive athletics. For students hoping to extend a career in the allied health professions to sports and athletics, this program provides the fundamental dynamics of how sport impacts individuals and society, through both a biomedical approach and a critical examination of the psychological and sociological dimensions of sport and physical activity.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ESS 101

Introduction to Exercise and Sports Studies

This course introduces students to the many sub-disciplines of exercise and sports science. An interdisciplinary approach will be used to explore the various biological and psychosocial dimensions of physical activity, sport and health. Students will study a range of topics including links between physical activity and disease risk, aswell as the influence of exercise and conditioning on athletic performance, disease prevention, and physical fitness.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ESS 201

Prin of First Aid in Athletic Injuries

This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic knowledge regarding the immediate and temporary care of athletic- and sports-related injury and illness. Safety concerns regarding exercise facilities and equipment, risk management and development of an emergency action plan will also be emphasized, as well as, recognition and care for both major and minor injuries and illnesses. The present course will also stress issues pertaining to professional certification,medical liability and other legal issues regarding the health, fitness and competitive sports industries.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
ESS 301

Fitness Eval & Exercise Prescription

This course is designed to familiarize students with the theoretical background and practical applications needed to competently assess levels of physical fitness,and develop exercise programs. Course content is highly focused toward the knowledge and skills required for ACSM Health Fitness Instructor (HFI)and NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) certification exams.

Prerequisites: ESS-201

3.0
ESS 270

Exercise and Sports Studies Practicum

This course gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience in the health and fitness industry and to explore the career options available in the field of exercise and sports studies. Students will research the various career pathways open in the exercise and sports field through both secondary sources and documented first-hand observation within various educational settings, community-based athletic programs, fitness centers, sports medicine clinics, athletic teams or corporate settings.

Prerequisites: ESS-101

3.0
DTC 328

Nutrition for Fitness & Athletic Performance

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the integrated science of nutrition and exercise physiology. The course will explore macro- and micronutrient needs as related to energy demands, cellular function, and growth, maintenance, and repair. Students will explore how optimal nutrition is essential for optimal performance. The course will focus on scientifically sound, evidence-based practice and examine sources of unsound sport nutrition recommendations. Assignments will allow students to gain a greater understanding of the energy requirements of exercise as well as the barriers to increased physical activity. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2.0
SOC/ESS

One Elective from SOC 312 or ESS 410

Choose one elective from SOC 312 or ESS 410
3
Total 17

Fine Arts (18 credit hours)

Fine Arts Minor (18 Credit Hours)

The fine arts minor is designed to provide an interdisciplinary approach to creative human expression for students interested in artistic performance, process and inquiry. Students have flexibility in designing their course of study within the minor and may choose to acquire either an in-depth understanding of a particular art—visual arts, dance, theater, music—or a broader, critical awareness of the visual and performing arts.

Students wishing to earn a fine arts minor will submit a portfolio documenting their creative and/or critical activities at D’Youville College at the end of their program to a committee of three faculty members for evaluation. This personal archive will generally consist of written programs, lists of repertoire studied and performed, samples of creative and/or critical work, and other evidence of creative achievements, including participation in public performances and/or exhibitions, as part of study toward the minor. The portfolio will be integrated into PHI 423 Philosophy of Art.

Five Courses (a minimum of 15 credits), with two at the 300-400 level:

Course Number Course Name Credits
DAN 101

Introduction to Dance

The student is acquainted with the principles and historical aspects of the world of classical and theatrical dance and their implications for developmental movement, creative expression and educational activities.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
DAN 210

Introduction to Ballet

Students are acquainted with two basic methods of classical ballet, Cecchetti and Vaganova. Students learn theories of movement of the body in dance, French terminology, barre, centre floor, adage, allegro and enchainements. This course follows a graded syllabus for participation.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
DAN 300

Elements of Dance Composition

Brief lectures on historical figures in dance combined with video presentations of significant choreographic works set the stage for each class topic. Exploring the basic elements of time, space and energy with structured exercises that will challenge the student to explore new directions in movement. Sharing and discussing choreographic studies will provide a stimulating experience

Prerequisites: None

3.0
DAN 305

Dance Performance and Technique

This course offers students an opportunity to develop an appreciation for choreography and dance ability through practice. Emphasis will be given to refining traditional movement exercises and choreographic endeavors in ballet, modern and jazz technique

Prerequisites: DAN-300

3.0
FA 105

Introduction to Photography

Intended for the beginner, this course teaches principles of design in composition, printing and display. Topics include camera handling, lighting, film and film development. Ownership of a camera is required.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 205

Drawing

This basic course emphasizes the elements and principles of design and composition as applied to a variety of drawing techniques. It is a studio course that uses a variety of media including still life, nature and the human figure.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 210

Design

This introduction to the study and application of design in the visual arts: focuses on problem solving and using principles of two- and three-dimensional design.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 218

History of Western Art

This course studies the major trends in the visual arts of Europe from antiquity to the present. Forms, symbols and images of the artistic styles will be illustrated on selected works of each historical period.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 305

Painting

This course is an introduction to oil painting, with emphasis on understanding color, paint handling and observation. Attention is given to the approach of painters, both past and present, through periodic slide presentations.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 314

Art of the Film

This introduction to the elements of filmmaking includes screenwriting, camera and lighting, performance, music and sound, editing and the role of the director. Feature films are used to study elements.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 320

History of Visual Arts in America

This is a survey of painting, sculpture and architecture of the United States from the colonial period to the present with emphasis on the evolution of styles of the 19th and 20th centuries. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 327

Modern Art

The development of major European and American styles in architecture, painting and sculpture in the last two centuries, from neoclassicism to contemporary trends, is studied.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 328

Art & the Everyday

This course combines an art-historical overview of contemporary artists using performance, happenings, action-based art, with influential critics, writers and photography with hands-on studio art-making.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
FA 330

Frank Lloyd Wright & Amer Architecture

The architecture of Wright in the historical context of modern American architecture is examined. The course explores his precursors and his impact on and debate with future tendencies.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
MUS 100

Music Appreciation

This is a basic introduction to music with emphasis on elements of music and musical styles. The course seeks to develop an understanding of music as well as the levels and spheres in which music is appreciated. Offered in the fall semester.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
MUS 200

Appreciation of Music

This course studies music elements, style, form and history through readings and in-depth listening. Students are taught how to listen to music and identify musical period, composer and composition style, orchestration and elements of music. A study of music in the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Post-Romantic era and 20th-century jazz, rock and blues will be included in this course.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: Mus-100 Recommended But Not Required

3.0
MUS 209

Intro to the American Musical Theater

This course surveys the elements of musical theater, e.g., lyrics, score, dance and design. The historical development of musical theater from opera to American stage musicals are covered.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
THE 104

Theater Production

This course acquaints students with theater history and the elements of theater(the roles of the playwright,director,producer,actor,scenic-lighting , sound and costume designers)as well as key developments, periods, playhouses and figures of influence in theater's evolution.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
THE 202

Introduction to Acting

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of character development through work on short scenes from major plays. A review of various theories of acting from Stanislavski and Uta Hagen to the Meisner approach to acting,will dovetail the development of a living character on stage with script analysis.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
THE 444

Theatre As Outreach

A practical workshop aimed at equipping students from all disciplines in the use of theater-based techniques in schools, community or non-theatrical environments (hospitals, therapeutic settings, youth centers, business retreats, etc.)

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ENG 213

Studies in Drama

This course examines the expression of human concerns in dramatic form. It is designed to make play-giving and play-reading enjoyable and enriching experiences. Selected plays are examined with emphasis on 20th century playwrights.

Prerequisites: ENG-111

3.0
ENG 302

Shakespeare

This course explores Shakespeare's dramatic and poetic presentation of human experience in all its ambiguities and contradictions. The course will investigate language, sources, historical context, staging and performance history.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: ENG-111 ENG-112

3.0
Total 15

All FA minors are required to take:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PHI 423

Philosophy of Art

This course investigates and assesses the value dimensions of fine art endeavors. These endeavors include but are not limited to theater arts, drawing, painting, photography, architecture, dance and music. It explores the fundamental question of "What is Art?" and analyzes a range of aesthetic works for their instrumental or intrinsic worth.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 3

Health Services Management (15 credit hours)

Health Services Management Minor (15 Credit Hours)

This minor provides an opportunity for the development of specialized knowledge in the area of health services management (HSM). Students take courses in the foundational areas of healthcare systems including management, insurance/reimbursement, and law/policy. They then select an area of interest: 1) population health which provides more emphasis on the public health aspects of HSM, 2) healthcare information management which provides an emphasis on the role of technology in HSM, or 3) communication in healthcare which provides more emphasis on the role of marketing in HSM.

Students who may benefit from specialized knowledge in HSM include but are not limited to: public health majors interested in management of health-related organizations such as health departments, nursing majors interested in administrative career tracks, sociology majors interested in graduate work in social and preventive medicine, and business and/or management students interested in health services management.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
HSM 210

Introduction to Healthcare Systems

This course presents a systems approach to the delivery of health services. Students will develop an understanding of the basic structures and operations of health care systems. The course examines resources, processes and outcomes of health systems.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
HSM 325

Management in Healthcare

This course introduces student to the principles of management applied to healthcare organizations. Topics include problem solving and decision making in the current health service marketplace; the ability to develop the skills, terminology and personal ethics/values to manage in a healthcare setting, as well as comprehending the leadership structure that guides the institutions to successful delivery of care.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: HSM-210

3.0
HSM 408

Health Insurance

This course provides students with an overview of diverse financial systems within American healthcare,focusing on reimbursement methods and payment systems and how they affect providers and payers. It also reviews major insurance programs,federal health care legislation,legal/regulatory issues,diagnosis and procedures coding systems,and the impact of coding on reimbursement,compliance,and fraud and abuse.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
HSM 410

Health Care Policy and Law

This course develops students'knowledge and understanding of the development and impact of policy and law in the US on healthcare organizations.Specific emphasis will be given to principles of law, policy and the U.S. legal system including laws and policies related documentation,privacy,security,release of health information,liability,consent,and malpractice.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: HSM-210

3.0
HSM

One Elective from HSM 306, HSM 315 or HSM 406

Choose one elective from HSM 306, HSM 315 or HSM 406
3
Total 15

History (15 credit hours)

History Minor (15 Credit Hours)

This minor requires any two courses at the 100 or 200 level including the required course for the core (6 credit hours). An additional three courses at the 300-400 level (9 credit hours) is also required.

Course Number Course Name Credits
HIS XXX

Two Electives from 100-200 level courses

Choose two electives from HIS 100-200 level courses.
6
HIS XXX

Three Electives from 300-400 level courses

Choose three electives from HIS 300-400 level courses.
9
Total 15

Management (15 credit hours)

Management Minor (15 Credit Hours)

The management minor provides a foundation in management skills—a “plus” for career advancement. Management skills are extremely useful in any interpersonal job or in a job with advancement potential based on management ability. Many jobs, such as administrative assistant and social worker, require skills in management. Not only does this minor aid in career advancement, but it also provides a broader background for admission to graduate programs in different management areas.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
MGT 305

Principles of Management

This course focuses on the nature and theory of management. It emphasizes the functional application of the basic principles of management to realistic business situations.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
MKT 304

Principles of Marketing

The course focuses on the fundamental concepts of marketing, such as analyses of buyer behavior, product development and distribution, and marketing research, planning and forecasting.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0

Three Electives from MGT, MKT or HRM courses

Choose three electives from the areas of Management, Marketing, and Human Resource Management.
9
Total 15

Mathematics (18 credit hours)

Mathematics Minor (18 Credit Hours)

This minor is available to students who wish to feature a mathematical foundation on their resumes.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
MAT 125

Calculus I

Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or have an SAT Math Sub-score 600+ or ACT 26+.

4.0
MAT 126

Calculus II

The course explores the basic techniques for integration as well as elementary transcendental functions and the applications of differential and integral calculus.

Prerequisites: MAT-125

4.0
MAT 202

Calculus III

The subject matter includes multivariate calculus, infinite series, differential equations and matrix algebra.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: MAT-126

4.0
MAT XXX

Two Mathematics Electives at 300/400 level

Choose two MAT electives that are acceptable for credit.
6
Total 18

Medical Sociology (15 Credit Hours)

Medical Sociology Minor (Minimum of 15 Credit Hours)
 

This minor is open to any student who is not already majoring in Sociology. It is especially tailored to students pursuing careers in health care who are interested in learning about how to better understand the broad patient population which they will experience, while improving the health of others by better appreciating how health and illness are experienced in society. Specifically, students will learn about how things like gender, race, class, ability, sexual orientation, and educational attainment – among other factors – result in differential access to and quality of health care.

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC

One Elective

Choose one elective from SOC-101 or SOC-102.
3
SOC 309

Soc of Disability & Rehabilitation

The consequences of disability can have an impact at many levels. The effects of disability(personal,interpersonal and cultural)have significant implications for persons with disabilities,rehabilitation workers and the rehabilitation system. This course will analyze the effects of disability within a sociology framework.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: SOC-101 SOC-102

3.0
SOC 313

Health Disparities

This course will explore how socioeconomic status, place, race, and ethnicity affect health disparities; how these characteristics play out in a case study; the implications of these disparities on society as a whole; effective strategies for limiting health disparities; and how local community members are utilizing these strategies to promote positive change.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 322

Health Illness & Society

This is a critical survey and analysis of theory and research on health institutions in modern society as well as social etiology of disease,sociological components in treatment,hospital organization and medical practice and sociology of medical education.

Prerequisites: SOC-101 or SOC-102

3.0
SOC 400

Social Epidemiology

This course focuses on social epidemiology,the factors determining the occurrence and distribution of disease,health defects,disability and death among groups. The interdisciplinary nature of epidemiological theory,statistical measures commonly used,and an analysis of the distribution of health care in the United States are studied.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 15

Natural Sciences (21 credit hours)

Natural Sciences Minor (21 Credit Hours)

Although any D’Youville student not seeking a degree in biology or chemistry can achieve this minor, it could easily be used by liberal studies in education (pre-elementary education) students to highlight their interest in the sciences since they already currently take 18 of these credits. The minor requires 21 hours, including at least one physics, one chemistry, one biology and three laboratory courses, chosen from this list. Additional courses may be applied with departmental approval.

Choose 21 Credit Hours From:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
BIO 117

Drugs and Disease

What exactly is a heart attack? Why does aspirin health prevent strokes? Why are anti-depressants associated with suicide? This basic course will answer these questions while providing an overview of common disease states and the drugs used to treat them. Disease states of the major organ systems will be covered as well as the most commonly prescribed drugs in America. Prerequisite: None: however, basic knowledge in biology is recommended; not eligible for elective credit in the major.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
BIO 145

The Process of Scientific Discovery

This is an introductory science course where students will be introduced to the major elements of science and technology including the basic insights of chemistry, physics, biology and geology in the context of the social and historical development of technology. Special attention will be paid to the impact of the sciences on cultural and human endeavors, and on the role of social change and serendipity in the process of scientific discovery. This course could count as a non-major science core course, an IDS science elective or as a free elective for science majors. There are no prerequisite course requirements. Course may be offered with an emphasis on the field of biology (BIO 145), chemistry (CHE 145) or physics (PHY 145).

Prerequisites: None

3.0
BIO 210

Modern Topics in Biology

This is an introduction to biological topics of general interest and practical value. Topics are drawn from areas such as basic biological principles, functioning of the human body, health problems and environmental issues. Students have a role in choosing topics and are actively involved in class presentations and discussions. This course consists of three lectures per week and is not eligible for elective credit in the major.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
BIO 215

Environmental Science

This is an introduction to the principles of environmental science and considers how those principles can be applied to our understanding and solution of current environmental problems. The course consists of three lectures per week and is not eligible for elective credit in the major.

Prerequisites: BIO-215L

3.0
BIO 215L

Environmental Science Laboratory

This is field and laboratory work designed to provide direct experience while investigating the basis for environmental principles. Students are exposed to the monitoring of environmental problems. The course is three laboratory hours per week and is not eligible for elective credit in the major.

Prerequisites: BIO-215

1.0
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 142

Molecules

This is an introductory course in chemistry, which addresses the key concepts of chemistry by studying the structures and workings of the molecules that people encounter in everyday life. Material will be presented in a conceptual manner, with minimal mathematics, and, to the extent possible, in a manner which connects chemistry to the everyday experiences of 21st century human beings. Topics will include atoms, molecules, intermolecular forces, bonding, molecular structure, chemical reactions, heat and energy, rates and equilibrium, acids and bases, light, electrochemistry, polymers and biochemistry. Lab must be taken concurrently

Prerequisites: CHE-142L

4.0
CHE 145

The Process of Scientific Discovery

This is an introductory science course where students will be introduced to the major elements of science and technology including the basic insights of chemistry, physics, biology and geology in the context of the social and historical development of technology. Special attention will be paid to the impact of the sciences on cultural and human endeavors, and on the role of social change and serendipity in the process of scientific discovery. This course could count as a non-major science core course, an IDS science elective or as a free elective for science majors. There are no prerequisite course requirements. Course may be offered with an emphasis on the field of biology (BIO 145), chemistry (CHE 145) or physics (PHY 145).

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 142

Introduction to Astronomy

This course is an introductory astronomy course for students from all majors. Students are introduced to the basics of the telescope, light, the seasons and the tides, the moon,the sun,the solar system, stars, galaxies and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Experience involving field use of telescopes and other observational tools is incorporated into the course. Astronomy will satisfy the non-lab core science elective or can also be used as a free elective. If taken in conjunction with the optional PHY 142L, it will also fulfill the core science requirement for a laboratory-based science course.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 142L

Introduction to Astronomy Lab

This laboratory accompanies the introductory astronomy course. The laboratory work supplements the lectures in Phy 142,focusing on the underlying physics of light,optics,wave motion and planetary motion.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PHY 145

The Process of Scientific Discovery

This is an introductory science course where students will be introduced to the major elements of science and technology including the basic insights of chemistry, physics, biology and geology in the context of the social and historical development of technology. Special attention will be paid to the impact of the sciences on cultural and human endeavors, and on the role of social change and serendipity in the process of scientific discovery. This course could count as a non-major science core course, an IDS science elective or as a free elective for science majors. There are no prerequisite course requirements. Course may be offered with an emphasis on the field of biology (BIO 145), chemistry (CHE 145) or physics (PHY 145).

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHY 151

Physics for Poets

This introductory physics course for non-science majors aims to survey the West's understanding of the physical universe from its origins in Greek thought to the latest discoveries of the 21st century. Since this covers such a vast area of study, the emphasis will be on breadth rather than depth. However, it is hoped that the student will acquire a comprehensive overview and appreciation for the discipline called physics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
BIO 10X

Choice of BIO 105 w/Lab or BIO 107 w/Lab

Choose two electives from BIO 105 and BIO 105L or BIO 107 and BIO 107L
4
PHY 1XX

Choice of PHY 101 w/Lab or PHY 111 w/Lab

Choose two electives from PHY 101 and PHY 101L or PHY 111 and PHY111L
4
PHY 1XX

Choice of PHY 102 w/Lab or PHY 112 w/Lab

Choose two electives from PHY 102 and PHY 102L or PHY 112 and PHY112L
4
BIO 389

Special Topics

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
BIO 390

Special Topics

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 21

Nutrition (12 credit hours)

Nutrition Minor (12 Credit Hours)

This minor provides an opportunity for the student to develop proficiency in the highly popular field of nutrition. Intended for students of all majors, this minor can be used for personal or professional development. Health professions majors will find this minor particularly beneficial as the health care field continues its focus on an integrated approach to treating the whole person.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
DTC 210

Food and Culture

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the study of the social, cultural, and psychological factors which influence food selection. Cultural eating patterns and nutrition-related health problems of various ethnic and racial groups will be explored. An introduction to basic food preparation and culinary techniques will be used to further investigate food choices of various cultures. An emphasis will be placed on the strong influence of culture on food attitudes and behaviors which affects the counseling strategy of the health care professional. The effect of globalization on food selection and health will be studied. Assignments address current research regarding food and culture and encourage the student to explore nutrition practices of culturally diverse clients. This course consists of one lecture hour and two lab hours. Open to all majors; required course for dietetics majors.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

2.0
DTC 327

Nutrition Throughout the Life Cycle

This three-credit course will examine nutritional needs and issues throughout the life span with special emphasis on preconception, pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence and aging. Normal nutrition topics and nutrition-related conditions and interventions will be studied for each stage of the life cycle. Nutrient needs and recommendations will be addressed as well as age-related physiological changes. Specific attention will be given to current public health issues and model public food and nutrition programs. Current evidence-based practice recommendations will be covered with use of position papers by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and American Academy of Pediatrics. This course consists of three lecture hours.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

3.0
DTC 328

Nutrition for Fitness & Athletic Performance

This two-credit course will introduce the student to the integrated science of nutrition and exercise physiology. The course will explore macro- and micronutrient needs as related to energy demands, cellular function, and growth, maintenance, and repair. Students will explore how optimal nutrition is essential for optimal performance. The course will focus on scientifically sound, evidence-based practice and examine sources of unsound sport nutrition recommendations. Assignments will allow students to gain a greater understanding of the energy requirements of exercise as well as the barriers to increased physical activity. This course consists of two lecture hours.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2.0
DTC 425

Diet Therapy

This course examines nutrition and diet therapy, including nutrition assessment, the physiological and biochemical bases of nutrition care, therapeutic diets, medications and herbal supplements. Topics include nutrition intervention for diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, eating disorders, GI diseases and promoting healthy eating. The emphasis of this course is the practical application of subject matter in the clinical setting.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: (DTC-306) or (NTR-325)

2.0
DTC/NTR

One Elective from DTC 306 or NTR 325

Choose one elective from DTC 306 or NTR 325
3
Total 12

Philosophy (15 credit hours)

Philosophy Minor (15 Credit Hours)

The minor in philosophy requires a total of five courses for 15 credit hours. It is designed to provide an acquaintance with critical analysis and an appreciation for the philosophical foundation of other disciplines.

The courses selected for the minor are regularly available so that there is ample opportunity for students to complete the required number of hours. Advisors should be made aware of a student’s interest in declaring a minor.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PHI 201

Ethics in Theory & Action

This course is an examination of human conduct and responsibility and the relationships between individuals and society.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI 204

Logic & Practical Reasoning

This course is a study of formal reasoning methods through informal fallacies, class logic and introduction to propositional logic.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI 3XX

Two Electives at the 300 level

Choose two 300-level electives.
6
PHI 4XX

One Elective at the 400 level

Choose one 400-level elective.
3
Total 15

Pre-Law (15 credit hours)

Pre-Law Minor (15 Credit Hours)

This minor provides the pre-law student with a range of courses that introduce legal thinking, acquaints the student with areas where a law background is often used and prepares the student for successful entry into and completion of law school.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
ECO 201

Macroeconomics

This course explores the price system, public and private sectors, national income accounting, unemployment and inflation, fiscal policy, budget deficits and the public debt, money and banking and the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. This course meets the social sciences requirement in the core.
Offered in: Fall and Summer
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PSC 201

American Government & Economics

This course is a study of the American political and economic systems including the theories underlying them, political parties, pressure groups, the money system, the credit system and the relations between government and the economy. This course meets the core requirements in political science/economics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI 204

Logic & Practical Reasoning

This course is a study of formal reasoning methods through informal fallacies, class logic and introduction to propositional logic.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
MGT/ACC

One Elective from MGT 305 or ACC 211

Choose one elective from MGT 305 or ACC 211
3
LAW/HIS

One Elective from LAW 303, LAW 304 or HIS 330

Choose one elective from LAW 303, LAW 304, or HIS 330
3
Total 15

Some of the above courses will be designated as writing intensive. The pre-law minor is expected to take four writing intensive courses from the above or in the general curriculum. The minor also includes an LSAT (Legal Scholastic Aptitude Test) preparation course offered through continuing education. Students would have a pre-law advisor with access to information on law schools and the LSAT examination.

Psychology (15 credit hours)

Psychology Minor (15 Credit Hours)

The psychology minor is designed to enhance a student’s academic experience and to provide background for those planning to pursue careers in any field that involves dealing with people.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PSY 101

General Psychology

This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include biology of behavior,sensation and perception consciousness, learning and memory,intelligence,motivation and emotion, stress and personality.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PSY 2XX

Two from PSY 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, or 208

Choose two electives from PSY 203, PSY 204, PSY 205PSY 206, PSY 207, or PSY 208
6
PSY

Two electives at any level

Choose two electives from PSY at any level.
6
Total 15

Public Health (18 credit hours)

Public Health Minor (18 Credit Hours)

The minor consists of six courses (18 credits). The first five courses are foundational courses for public health majors. For the sixth course students may select one elective from a list of courses approved for the public health major. Public health focuses on the health of populations rather than individuals and in an excellent complement to many clinical degrees.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
HSM 110

Introduction to Public Health

Public health aims to prevent and treat disease and to promote and protect health through strategies that engage the community. This course will examine the history of public health as well as core areas of public health including assessment, assurance and policy development. Students will learn about health promotion and disease promotion and disease prevention of communicable and non-communicable disease social and behavioral aspects of health, epidemiology, environmental health and health policy.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
SOC 400

Social Epidemiology

This course focuses on social epidemiology,the factors determining the occurrence and distribution of disease,health defects,disability and death among groups. The interdisciplinary nature of epidemiological theory,statistical measures commonly used,and an analysis of the distribution of health care in the United States are studied.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
PH 301

Health Behavior

This course will review the determinants of health-related behavior and important theories, as well as discuss how these theories can be practically applied in planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs. This course will begin to answer the meta-question as it relates to health behavior: "Why do people do what they do?"

Prerequisites: HSM-110

3.0
PH 302

Global Health

This course will prepare future health professionals to work in a global market whether it is in their local community or in some faraway land. This course will provide insights in understanding global health issues and the improvement of health at a population level.

Prerequisites: HSM-110

3
HSM 312

Health Edu Program Planning & Evaluation

This course focuses on health education at the individual and population levels. Students will learn how to conduct a community diagnosis, mobilize communities for action in promoting healthy behaviors at individual and community levels. Students will learn how to align strategies with Healthy People 2010 and measure improvements.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
*Elective

One Elective from BIO 117, BIO 208, PSY 353, SOC 322, SOC 323, HIS 336, HSM 210, HSM 220, HSM 406 or PSC 250

Choose one elective from BIO 117, BIO 208, PSY 353, SOC 322, SOC 323, HIS 336, HSM 220, HSM 406 or PSC 250
3
Total 18

* List is not exhaustive.

Religious Studies (15 credit hours)

Religious Studies Minor (15 Credit Hours)

The religious studies minor requires a total of 5 courses for 15 credit hours. It is designed to provide foundational knowledge of religious beliefs from various religious perspectives and across academic disciplines.

Required Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
RS 102

Belief & Unbelief in the Brave New World

This introductory course in the phenomenon of religious faith examines the classic examples of the case for and against living in faith,with the view of enabling students to evaluate their own attitudes toward religion. Faith traditions of Western and Eastern cultures provide additional data for this evaluation.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS

One Elective from RS 101, RS 202, RS 309 or RS 410

Choose one elective from RS 101, RS 202, RS 309, or RS 410
3
Total 6

Select three of the following electives:

Course Number Course Name Credits
RS 209

Major Western Faiths

This course surveys the main elements of the history, thought and practice of the major religious traditions of the Western world:judaism,christianity and islam.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 211

Catholicism Today

This is a systematic study of the foundational beliefs of catholicism; where they came from,how they have changed and how they are interpreted today.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 411

Mysticism

This course defines mysticism, the history, theory, phenomena and practices of selected mystical school and the positive and negative aspects of the mystical experience.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 351

Religion in American History

This course will explore the many important issues in American religious history over the past 400 years. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 315

Spirituality in Human Experience

This course explores the history of spirituality in human experience. Traditional and non-traditional expressions will be investigated as will varied applications in life. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 201

Religion & Social Responsibility

The nature and principles of religious ethics in the Judeo-Christian tradition are explored with an emphasis on historical and contemporary attitudes of religion towards social responsibility. Topics for discussion include: sexuality,identity,power,violence,war,racism and medical ethics.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 214

Challenges of Death

This course examines the ways in which death challenges human meaning and action. Topics such as the meaning of suffering and death,challenges of death to morality,psychological spiritual processes of dying and bereavement are considered.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 316

Catholic Social Teaching

This course provides a historical,theoretical and practical overview of the principles and themes of the Roman Catholic encyclical tradition. It explores views of christian social responsibility through classic texts and contemporary problems.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
RS 312

Bioethics Seminar

Ethical dilemmas and problems posed by developments in the biosciences are analyzed. Problems discussed include choices for life or death,allocation of resources,human experimentation,reproductive technologies,professional client relationships,etc.

Prerequisites: PHI-201 or PHI/RS-214

3.0
RS 369

Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

This course will focus on understanding the purpose, development and experience of spirituality, religious thought and practice and it's implication for individual and social behavior. Offered as needed.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 9

Sociology (15 credit hours)

Sociology Minor (15 Credit Hours)

The minor is sociology is designed for students who are interested in gaining a greater understanding of social and cultural organization and patterns of human interaction. It is open to students in any field other than sociology.

Required Course and Additional Courses:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC 10X

One Elective from SOC 101 or SOC 102

Choose two electives from SOC 101 or SOC 102
3
SOC XXX

Four Electives (Only two can be cross-listed w/major)

Choose four electives from SOC courses. Only two can be cross-listed with the student's major.
12
Total 15

Spanish (12 credit hours)

Adding a Spanish minor to your degree plan will make you more marketable in the job market. The U.S. has the second-largest Spanish-speaking population in the world and the numbers continue to grow. With 35 million people in U.S. speaking Spanish as their first language, having a fundamental understanding of Spanish communication skills can give you an immediate advantage over your peers in the job market. Because Spanish is spoken in 20 countries worldwide, having Spanish language ability opens the door to travel or work in countries rich in Hispanic culture and history.

Spanish (12 credit hours)

The minor in Spanish is designed to give students the opportunity to acquire an intermediate or higher level of proficiency. Students who begin Spanish at D'Youville will be required to take the first two semesters of Spanish (SPA 101-102). Students exempt from elementary courses will be required to take more advanced courses at the 100-300 level.

  • Emphasis on oral communication, speaking and listening skills
  • Choose a minimum of 4 three-credit courses to earn a minor
  • In some instances courses taken may also be used to satisfy the General Education curriculum

Spanish Minor (12 Credit Hours)

The minor in Spanish is designed to give students the opportunity to acquire an intermediate or higher level of proficiency. Students who begin Spanish at D'Youville will be required to take the first two semesters of Spanish. Students exempt from elementary courses will be required to take more advanced courses at the 100- to 300-level.

Required Courses for Student Not Exempt from SPA 101:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SPA 101

Beginner Spanish I

SPA 101 is designed to introduce true beginners to the Spanish language. The primary focus of the course is to provide you with a basic knowledge of Spanish through the extensive practice of the four fundamental skills in language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Attention is also given to the fifth language skill- cultural awareness. Through a communicative approach and through the use of the Spanish language, students will learn the fundamental grammatical workings of the Spanish language and apply their knowledge of such concepts in both spoken and written exercises. Integrated throughout the course, are lessons and readings linked to the daily activities and basic aspects of the Hispanic culture, which vary from country to country.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

3.0
SPA 102

Beginner Spanish II

This course is the second semester of beginner Spanish and the continuation of SPA 101. Before moving forward to the material of SPA 102, the course begins with a review of the salient points of SPA 101. The primary focus of the course is to expand your knowledge of the Spanish language and enable you to acquire an elementary foundation of the Spanish language. There will be extensive practice of the four fundamental skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Increased attention is also given to the fifth skill of cultural awareness. Through a communicative approach and an increased use of the Spanish language, students will learn the fundamental grammatical workings of the Spanish language and apply their knowledge of such concepts in both spoken and written exercises. Integrated throughout the course, are lessons and readings linked to the daily activities and basic aspects of the Hispanic culture, which vary from country to country.
Offered in: Fall and Spring
Prerequisites: Spa-101

3.0
SPA 201

Intermediate Spanish I

Spanish 201 is an intermediate-level integrated skills language course that will expand on the language skills mastered in Spanish 101 and 102 or SPA 103, or SPA 104. The course begins with a quick review of the salient points of beginner Spanish before it introduces you to the intermediate level material. This course will enhance your proficiency in the Spanish language and acquire an intermediate-level foundation in the Spanish language. There will be extensive practice of the four fundamental skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as extensive instruction on culture. Through a communicative approach and the exclusive use of Spanish, students will learn more complex grammatical structures of the Spanish language and apply their knowledge of such concepts in both spoken and written exercises. Integrated throughout the course, are lessons and readings linked to the daily activities and basic aspects of the Hispanic culture, which vary from country to country.

Prerequisites: SPA-102 SPA-103 or SPA-104

3.0
SPA

One additional SPA course

 One additional SPA course
3
Total 12

Required Courses for Students Exempt from SPA 101:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SPA

SPA 101 or SPA 103

Choose either SPA 101 or SPA 103
3
SPA 201

Intermediate Spanish I

Spanish 201 is an intermediate-level integrated skills language course that will expand on the language skills mastered in Spanish 101 and 102 or SPA 103, or SPA 104. The course begins with a quick review of the salient points of beginner Spanish before it introduces you to the intermediate level material. This course will enhance your proficiency in the Spanish language and acquire an intermediate-level foundation in the Spanish language. There will be extensive practice of the four fundamental skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as extensive instruction on culture. Through a communicative approach and the exclusive use of Spanish, students will learn more complex grammatical structures of the Spanish language and apply their knowledge of such concepts in both spoken and written exercises. Integrated throughout the course, are lessons and readings linked to the daily activities and basic aspects of the Hispanic culture, which vary from country to country.

Prerequisites: SPA-102 SPA-103 or SPA-104

3.0
SPA

Two additional SPA courses

 Two additional SPA courses
6
Total 12

Required Courses for Students exempt from SPA 102 or 103 will take:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SPA 201

Intermediate Spanish I

Spanish 201 is an intermediate-level integrated skills language course that will expand on the language skills mastered in Spanish 101 and 102 or SPA 103, or SPA 104. The course begins with a quick review of the salient points of beginner Spanish before it introduces you to the intermediate level material. This course will enhance your proficiency in the Spanish language and acquire an intermediate-level foundation in the Spanish language. There will be extensive practice of the four fundamental skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as extensive instruction on culture. Through a communicative approach and the exclusive use of Spanish, students will learn more complex grammatical structures of the Spanish language and apply their knowledge of such concepts in both spoken and written exercises. Integrated throughout the course, are lessons and readings linked to the daily activities and basic aspects of the Hispanic culture, which vary from country to country.

Prerequisites: SPA-102 SPA-103 or SPA-104

3.0
SPA

Three additional SPA courses

Three additional SPA courses
9
Total 12

Required Courses for Students exempt from SPA 201 and/or SPA 202 will take:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SPA

Any four SPA courses

Any four SPA courses
12
Total 12

Questions?

Not sure what Spanish course to register for? Contact Dr. Paola Kersch at kerschp@dyc.edu for more information.

Spanish for the Health Professions (12 credit hours)

Spanish for the Health Professions (12 credit hours)

A minor in Spanish for the Health Professions provide not only linguistic competence, but an understanding of sociocultural aspects of Hispanic ethnic groups, which is essential to a professional's ability to work with Spanish-speaking persons

  • Learn conversational Spanish, providing relevant and in-demand skills for healthcare professionals
  • Choose a minimum of 4 three-credit courses to earn a minor
  • In some instances courses taken may also be used to satisfy the General Education curriculum

Questions?

Not sure what Spanish course to register for? Contact Dr. Paola Kersch at kerschp@dyc.edu for more information.