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Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD), 4-Year

Students and faculty working in a D'Youville College compounding laboratory.

D'Youville's 4-year professional PharmD program leads to a Doctor of Pharmacy degree and opportunities in a wide range of fields from research to clinical settings.

Overview & Distinctions

Overview

As a pharmacist, you'll serve on the front lines of medicine as a critical component of patients’ health—whether working in the lab, the community, government, or in a clinical setting.

Today’s pharmacists act as part of an integrated healthcare team, educating patients on the use of both prescription and over-the-counter medications, advising physicians and other healthcare professionals on the best use of therapeutic medications, and offering advice about drug interactions and side effects .

There are several pathways into D'Youville's four-year ACPE-accredited Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program for candidates who've earned a bachelor’s degree or are in the the process of completing the prerequisite coursework.

What You'll Learn

D'Youville's curriculum integrates the natural and social sciences with practice experience in a team-based educational environment. Upon graduation, you will be prepared to:

  • Communicate effectively with patients and other healthcare practitioners
  • Troubleshoot and solve problems related to drug therapy regimens
  • Develop and evaluate programs to improve the health of the communities you serve
  • Become an effective contributor to a healthcare team

Why Choose D'Youville?

  • Start your introductory pharmacy practice experience in your first semester. You'll learn to communicate with patients, solve problems related to medications and manage yourself and others in a practice environment.
  • Studies show that teamwork across clinical specialties improves patient outcomes. D'Youville's unique interdisciplinary education lab offers the opportunity for you to practice treating patients (played by actors) alongside a team of students from 7 other healthcare majors at DYC - all under the supervision of a skilled instructor.
  • Enrich your leadership skills while giving back, by joining D'Youville faculty in advocacy and service projects.
  • Showcase your best work and document your progress in mastering the school's educational outcomes through an e-portfolio.
  • D'Youville PharmD graduates achieve excellent scores on national and state licensing exams; Our graduates from 2014 - 2018 report a 97% job placement rate.

Admission Requirements

Admissions Requirements

Prerequisite courses

Students admitted into the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program are required to complete a minimum of 60-61 prerequesite credit hours. Those applicants who are in the process of completing the prerequisite coursework are welcome to apply to our PharmD program .

Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Requisite Courses

FALL
Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
MAT 125

Calculus I

Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or have an SAT Math Sub-score 600+ or ACT 26+.

4.0
ENG 111

Introduction to Literature: Acad Writing

This course is an introduction to literature and the fundamentals of academic writing. Students learn the skills essential to college success:critical reading and analytical thinking, interpretation, scholarly discussion and collaboration, effective oral presentation, composition of writing for both readers and listeners.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 15
SPRING
Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
ENG 112

Liberal Arts Seminar: Research Writing

This course teaches academic research skills and writing based on a liberal arts topic. Topics vary by instructor.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Two Courses Social Science or Humanities*** 6
Total 17
FALL
Course Number Course Name Credits
One course with lab Human Biomedical Science with Lab** 4
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prerequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course from PHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L or be a pre-pharmacy student.

4.0
PHY 101

General Physics I

This calculus-based course is an introduction to the principles of kinematics and dynamics as they apply to both translational and rotational motion. Topics include Newton's laws, forces, friction, gravity, Kepler's laws, dot products and cross products, potential and kinetic energy, and momentum. Considerable attention is paid to the intellectual history that accompanied the emergence of the Newtonian world view.

Prerequisites: Mat-125, Phy-101L

3.0
PHY 101L

Gen Physics Lab I



Prerequisites: None

1.0
Total 16
SPRING
Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO Human Biomedical Science with Lab**One course with lab 4
CHE 220

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 219. The physical properties, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of aromatic rings, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Amines, carboxylic acids and its derivatives, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromaticity and enols are studied. The theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spec) methods are also covered.

Prerequisites: CHE-219, CHE-220L

3.0
CHE 220L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

This lab emphasizes the reactions that are covered in lecture such as, but not limited to, ester synthesis, electrophilic substitution of an aromatic ring, Grignard reagents and reduction of carbonyl compounds. This lab also places an importance on mastering spectroscopic methods such as IR and NMR utilizing in-house instrumentation. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-219L, CHE-220

1.0
SPE 201

Public Speaking

This is an introduction to speaking before groups and includes techniques of speech preparation and delivery,adapting to the purpose of the speaking situation,and practice in various types of oral presentation in a comfortable workshop atmosphere.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ECO 201

Macroeconomics

This course explores the price system, public and private sectors, national income accounting, unemployment and inflation, fiscal policy, budget deficits and the public debt, money and banking and the Federal Reserve and monetary policy. This course meets the social sciences requirement in the core.
Offered in: Fall and Summer
Prerequisites: None

3.0
One course Social Science or Humanities*** 3
Free elective/Human Biomedical Science with Lab (200 level or higher or course equivalent)** 4
Total 21

A. ** Two 200-level or higher Human Biomedical science courses without labs can be substituted for a single Human Biomedical Science with Lab. The Biomedical Science courses that are acceptable include Microbiology, Anatomy, Physiology, Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Pharmacology.  However, Microbiology or Anatomy and Physiology are recommended.
B. *** Acceptable Social Sciences are Sociology, Psychology, History or Political Science.
C. ***Acceptable Humanities are Ethics, Philosophy, Fine Arts, Literature, Religious Studies and Foreign Language. 
D. All pre-requisite coursework must be completed with a grade of “C” (2.0/4.0) or better.
E. Science and Math courses should be current, completed no more than five years prior to enrollment.
F. All prerequisite Math and Science courses must be equivalent in scope and rigor to those required for Math, Chemistry and Biology majors at D’Youville College.
G. All students are expected to be proficient in the implementation of computer operating systems, software applications for word processing, statistical analysis, database management, presentations, e-mail, and the use of online databases.
H. All questions concerning prerequisite requirements or course equivalents should be directed to Dr. Christopher Jadoch.

Application requirements

The D'Youville College of Pharmacy participates in PharmCAS, the Pharmacy College Admission Service. To apply to DYC Professional Pharmacy Program (PharmD) complete the online PharmCAS application.

You'll need to submit:

  • Results of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT, code 104);
  • Official transcripts from all colleges previously attended;
  • Three letters of reference from academic professors, employers or supervisors, and faculty or healthcare advisors;
  • TOEFL scores are required for applicants whose native language is not English. TSE is required if TOEFL score is less than 600 paper, 250 computer, or 100 internet. TSE minimum score of 40 is required. Test reports must be reported to PharmCAS. The TOEFL test is not required for students who have attended an English speaking institution for two or more years. Students who complete D'Youville's Intensive English Program do not need to submit TOEFL scores.

Evaluation criteria

The Admission Committee reviews the following criteria for admission to the Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program:

  • Applicant's academic performance
  • PCAT scores
  • Letters of recommendation

Successful applicants will hold a prerequisite GPA of 2.5 or higher, demonstrate the ability to perform well in a rigorous course of study, possess excellent verbal and written communication skills, be devoted to lifelong learning, and will strive to become competent and compassionate healthcare providers.

Next Steps

Selected applicants will be invited to campus for an interview. Performance on the personal interview will help the committee assess the applicant's potential to develop into a competent, compassionate pharmacist capable of rendering patient-centered care.

  • The interview process employs a series of multiple mini-interviews to assess non-cognitive skills important to rendering patient-centered care.
  • The domains evaluated in the mini-interviews include: excellence, lifelong learning, cultural diversity, professionalism, leadership, social responsibility, critical inquiry and collaboration (core values of the DYC SOP)

Practice Experience

Practice Experience

Experiential education is one of the core elements of D’Youville’s pharmacy program. You'll start your introductory pharmacy practice experience in your first semester. You'll learn to communicate with patients, solve problems related to medications and manage yourself and others in a practice environment.

D’Youville’s pre-pharmacy program emphasizes such vital skills as:
  • Critical thinking
  • Problem solving
  • Communication in both written and oral modes
  • Time management
  • Organizational competencies

The Office of Experiential Education coordinates and manages all aspects of experiential education for the School of Pharmacy once students begin their graduate studies. From introductory rotations to advanced experiences with innovative and progressive pharmacy practices, the Office of Experiential Education works with students, preceptors, and faculty to ensure a highly successful learning experience.

The Office of Experiential Education is willing and able to place students in rotations in pharmacies anywhere within the U.S. and in several international locations as well. Some international opportunities include Haiti, Uganda, Ecuador, Turks and Caicos, London and China .

International exchange rotations will also be available in Australia, Ireland, England and Puerto Rico in the near future.

Careers

Careers

Our program prepares you for general pharmacy practice.

A Pharmacist's role

Pharmacists do a lot more than just dispense medications. Today's pharmacists serve on the front lines of medicine as a critical component of patients’ health—whether working in the lab, the community, government, or in a clinical setting .

Today’s pharmacists act as part of an integrated healthcare team, educating patients on the use of both prescription and over-the-counter medications, advising physicians and other healthcare professionals on the best use of therapeutic medications, and offering advice about drug interactions and side effects.

Pharmacists also participate in the research and development of new drugs, consult on drug manufacture and usage, and inform public health policy in relation to new and existing medications .

Industries & settings

Pharmacists work in a variety of healthcare settings in a variety of roles including:

Community pharmacists working in retail settings dispensing medications, advising patients on drug effects and interactions, and providing primary health care services such as flu and shingles vaccinations.

Clinical pharmacists working in hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare settings. Clinical pharmacists work as part of an integrated healthcare team in the hospital. They provide advice on dosage and timing of medications, efficacy of specific pharmaceuticals and their alternatives, and the role of medications in the treatment of a variety of health conditions and diseases.

Consultant pharmacists providing advice on medications to institutions such as hospitals or health insurance companies. Some consultant pharmacists also provide direct consultation to patients through their own private practices.

Pharmaceutical industry pharmacists working in the pharmaceutical industry in areas ranging from marketing to sales to research.

Job Outlook

Pharmacists are in demand and well compensated. The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the median starting wage for pharmacists in 2017 was over $124,170.

For more information about the job outlook for pharmacists, visit the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

Curriculum

Curriculum

Doctor of Pharmacy
Degree: Pharm.D.

Kindly note that the curriculum outlined below is under the auspices of the Curriculum Committee of the School of Pharmacy and may be subject to change.

First Professional Year: Fall Semester

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 601

Biochemical Principles I

Students learn about the structure/ function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. The first semester topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism) lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods,vitamins and nutrition.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 603

Anatomy Physiology Pathophysiology I

This is the first of two courses in which students learn about the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integumentary, skeletal,muscular, nervous systems, and sense organs. Students build a comprehensive theoretical foundation of the phenomena that produce alterations in human physiologic function throughout life, emphasizing disease processes as disturbances of the body's homeostasis. The body's defense mechanisms and their breakdown, and clinical assessment methods are also presented in the course. Students view classroom demonstrations that examine the skeletal, muscular, and nervous system, and their composite cell and tissue types.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 605

Principles of Drug Action I

This course introduces drugs as molecules, including the basic principles related to molecules such as equilibrium and kinetic phenomena. Initial information provided in the course also includes the molecular basis of drug selectivity and drug action. The latter portion of the course then focuses on the primary determinants of the disposition of drugs in the body, namely absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 607

Prof of Pharmacy & Health Care Systems

This course introduces students to the evolving US health care system. Students learn about the social, economic, and political environments in which health care is delivered, and the impact of these factors on the practice of pharmacy. By examining personal strengths and weaknesses, exploring career options, and thinking and writing reflectively, students will develop lifelong learning skills.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 611

Prof Dev of Student Pharmacist I

This is the first in a six-term sequence of courses that augments and enhances student learning throughout the didactic curriculum. In this first course, students will be introduced to the profession of pharmacy including the evolution of practice from a dispensing to a pharmaceutical care model. Through team-based learning students will systematically analyze patient cases using scientific and clinical reasoning. They will utilize sources of professional knowledge, strategies for accessing drug information and literature, and quantitative and qualitative data to support decision making. To help students (and faculty) assess their progress in achieving curricular and professional goals, they will create a professional e-portfolio that will help them manage various types of evidence that reflect their learning and growth.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 613

Patient Assessment I

In this practicum course, students will learn and practice the fundamentals of patient assessment, including physical examination, interviewing skills (such as history taking and symptom analysis) and interpretation of laboratory test results. Students will also become familiar with common drug names, categories, dosing and therapeutic uses. Classroom time will be a combination of large and small group work. Skill-based activities, such as the practicing of components of a physical examination, will be practiced in student pairs with designated small teams.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 617/PMD 619

P1 IPPE Community or P1 IPPE Institutional

1-2
PMD 621

Professional Development & Skills Assessment



Prerequisites: None

0.0
Total 18-19

Spring Semester

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 604

Anatomy Physiology Pathophysiology II

Comprehensive Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II + laboratory provides a sequel to PMD 603 and 613; the course continues examination of organ systems. Material includes anatomical description, physiological explanations, and pathological states, considered as disruptions of the normal anatomy and physiology. Etiology, pathogenesis, and treatment approaches will be discussed. This course will undertake coverage of: cell physiology and response to injury, inflammation, fever, healing, cell cycle and neoplasia, musculoskeletal and joint disorders, neurophysiology, neurological & psychological disorders, pathophysiology of selected endocrine glands, physiology and disorders of the digestive system and selected auxiliary glands (liver and pancreas).

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 606

Principles of Drug Action II

The initial portion provides an introduction to the role of pharmacology in pharmacy and moves on to basic receptor pharmacology and enzymology. The course then continues the molecular basis of pharmacologic activity, protein binding, complexion and drug action. Basic aspects of medicinal chemistry and drug metabolism are also covered. The latter portion of the course then delves into various dosage forms and routes of drug delivery.

Prerequisites: None

5.0
PMD 610

Hlth Comm Diversity & Bioethics Communications/Diversity/Bioethics

Students learn to apply the theoretical principles for communicating effectively with patients,families, and physicians, other health professionals, and provider groups. Students discuss the impact of race, sexual orientation, culture, religion, and physical ability on patients perceptions of the healthcare system and the delivery of services. Students also learn to recognize ethical dilemmas and resolve problems using basic ethical principles and an ethical decision-making process.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 612

Prof Dev of Student Pharmacist II

This is the second in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 614

Patient Assessment II

In this course, students will learn and practice the fundamentals of patient assessment, including physical examination, interviewing skills and interpretation of laboratory test results. Students will also become familiar with common drug names, categories, dosing and therapeutic uses, as well as counseling skills based on the top medications. Classroom time will be a combination of large and small group work. Skill-based activities, such as the practicing of the components of a physical examination, will be demonstrated in student pairs with designated small teams.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 618/PMD 620

Community IPPE or Hospital IPPE

Students should choose from Community IPPE (PMD-618) or Hospital IPPE (PMD-620).
1-2
PMD 622

Professional Development



Prerequisites: None

0.0
PMD 624

Self-Care

Students learn about the role of the pharmacist in the management of self-limiting illnesses and self-care. Students learn appropriate triage and referral techniques and the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of non-prescription products and devices, as well as complementary and non-pharmacologic interventions utilized for self-care problems.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 626

Introductory Pharmacy Calculations

This course reviews basic math skills necessary for solving pharmaceutical calculation problems and accurate weighing and measurement of pharmaceutical ingredients. Specific calculations involved in individual dosage forms will be covered as well as the application to hospital and community pharmacy.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
Total 18-19

Second Professional Year: Fall Semester

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 701

Principles of Drug Action III

This is the final course of the three-course sequence. Students continue to learn how dosage forms and routes of delivery affect the disposition of drugs. Students also learn about recent advances in pharmaceutical dosage forms (such as protein pharmaceuticals) that are utilized in current and future pharmacy practice.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 703

Pharmacotherapeutics I

This course is the first of a seven-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, drug disposition and pharmacology in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Specific topics covered will include the pharmacotherapy of: acute and chronic kidney disease, fluid and electrolyte disorders, acid-base disorders, erectile dysfunction, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and urinary incontinence.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 705

Pharmacotherapeutics II

This course is the second of a seven-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacotherapy in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Specific topics covered will include cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders including hypertension, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, acute coronary syndromes, arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies, thromboembolism, hyperlipidemia, stroke, shock, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cystic fibrosis.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 709

Integrated Compounding & Practice

In this course, students practice the mathematical calculations required for compounding,dispensing, and administering medications including determination of the rate of administration of IV infusions, calculating drug concentrations and ratio strengths, as well as extent of ionization of drugs in solution. In laboratory sessions,students are provided opportunities to interpret prescription orders and prepare sterile and non-sterile dosage forms for dispensing.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 711

Prof Dev of Student Pharmacist III

This is the third course in the six-term sequence. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 713

Pharmacogenomics

This course will introduce genetics and molecular and cellular biology and will describe the nature of genetic materials and the universal genetic code. Students should be able to identify and describe molecular mechanisms such as replication, transcription and translation. The goal of this course is to enable students to understand how these disciplines can be used to explain the possible genetic basis for variability in drug response. Also, there will be discussion on the application of bioinformatics studies to pharmacogenomics and ethical issues in genomics. The pharmacogenetics of oxidative drug metabolism will be presented, as well as the potential applications to tailoring drug therapy. A discussion of drug transporters pharmacognegentics will include localization and function, variability and clinical consequences. The role of genetic variability in drug targets on drug efficacy and toxicity, and application to individualize drug therapy will be explored. Finally, current and future pharmacognenomics applications for several therapeutic areas such as oncology, hematology, infectious diseases such as HIV, TB, etc. will be described.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 717/PMD 719

P2 IPPE Community or P2 IPPE Institutional

1-2
PMD 721

Professional Development & Skills Assessment



Prerequisites: None

0.0
Total 18-19

Spring Semester

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 702

Medical Microbiology & Immunology

Students learn the classification, morphology, and virulence of microorganisms and medical pathogens, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of infectious diseases, and the basic concepts of immunology. Students utilize their knowledge of immunology to understand the principles of antibiotic use, emphasizing the need to understand the site of infection, the susceptibility patterns for responsible organisms and the ability of the drug to reach the site of infection.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 704

Pharmacotherapeutics III

This course is the third of a seven-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacotherapy in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes for patients. Specific topics covered will include the pharmacotherapy of: anesthesia; neurologic disorders such as epilepsy, movement disorders and migraine headaches; psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders,sleep disorders and dementia; and diseases of the eye.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 706

Pharmacotherapeutics IV

This course is the fourth in a seven-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, drug disposition, and pharmacology in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Specific topics covered will include the pharmacotherapy of endocrine and gynecologic disorders including diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, adrenal and pituitary gland disorders, pregnancy and lactation, contraception, endometriosis and hormone replacement therapy in women.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 708

Evidence-Based Medicine I

In this course, students learn basic concepts of research methodology in order to develop, analyze, and present their own research projects and critically evaluate the validity and clinical relevance of published articles. Students learn to appropriately analyze various types of data using parametric and non-parametric statistics, probability and inferential statistics (e.g. analysis of variance and multiple regressions).

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 712

Professional Development of a Student Pharmacist

This is the fourth in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 714

Pharmacy Management

In this course students learn the common management principles employed in the practice of pharmacy. Students learn business methods ranging from personal management to operations management, managing people, accounting basics and finance. Students also learn about marketing, purchasing, value-added services, and obtaining reimbursement for providing cognitive services as well as managing risks. Students are expected to apply concepts learned in class to prepare a business plan that provides the blueprint for buying an existing independent community pharmacy or developing a new pharmacy.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PMD 718/PMD 720

Community IPPE or Hospital IPPE

Students should choose from Community IPPE (PMD-718) or Hospital IPPE (PMD-720).
1-2
PMD 722

Professional Development



Prerequisites: None

0.0
Total 18-19

Third Professional Year: Fall Semester

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 801

U.S. and N.Y.S. Pharmacy Law

This course introduces students to the federal and New York state laws and regulations which govern the practice of pharmacy and regulate the manufacture and distribution of drug products and devices. Students learn the basic principles of tort law and professional malpractice. Students apply concepts learned in class to the analysis of case studies. Students review the historical events that have shaped today's professional pharmacy practice, and learn about the drug development and distribution system from a legal perspective.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 803

Infectious Disease V

This course is the fifth in a seven-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, drug disposition, and pharmacology in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Specific topics covered will include the pharmacotherapy of gastrointestinal, nutritional, and skin, bone and joint disorders including gastroesophageal reflux, peptic ulcer, inflammatory bowel disease, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, viral hepatitis, obesity, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout, acne, atopic dermatitis, and psoriasis.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 805

Pharm Gastrointestinal V I

This course is the sixth in a seven-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, drug disposition, and pharmacology in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. Specific topics covered will include the pharmacotherapy of infectious diseases of the respiratory tract, skin, and soft tissue, tuberculosis, parasitic diseases, urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases, sepsis, fungal infections, and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 811

Prof Dev of Student Pharmacist IV

This is the fifth in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 813

Evidence-Based Medicine II

Students demonstrate effective communication and organizational skills by preparing, delivering, and evaluating professional seminars.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 8XX

One elective from the 800 level

Choose one elective from PMD 800 level.
2
PMD 849

P3 IPPE Practice

The P3 Practice IPPE Rotation provides the opportunity for the student to test knowledge and skills they acquired through classes and previous pharmacy practice experiences through application with a clinical pharmacist preceptor. Under the supervision of their preceptors, students will be introduced to communicating with patients, care givers, providers, and other health professionals as well as research methods and process.

Prerequisites: None

0.0
PMD 877

MTM IPPE I

Purpose While partaking in the Medication Therapy Management Pharmacy IPPE Rotation the student will gain experience in providing MTM services which is recognized as a growing area in all areas of pharmacy practice. Students will be the learning the fundamentals of the MTM process in both training that involves simulated cases with the potential for real world integration. Students will receive the APhA MTM Training Certificate in the P2 year and successfully complete the required 5 post cases during this IPPE. Goals & Objectives The goal of this IPPE course is to expose the student to the expanding role Pharmacists play in pharmaceutical care with emphasis on the patient care process. The premise and focus will be on addressing Drug Related Problems (DRPS) with documentation of efforts via the MTM platform.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: None

0.0
PMD 851/PMD 853/PMD 855

P3 IPPE Long Term Care or Compounding Bootcamp or International Pharmacy

1
PMD 859

Professional Dvpmt and Skills Assessment



Prerequisites: None

0.0
Total 16

Spring Semester

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 804

Pharmacotherapeutics VII

This course is the seventh of an eight-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacology and pharmacotherapy in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes and tolerability for patients. This course will focus on agents used in the management of:toxicological disorders, pain disorders, substance abuse, and disorders specific to pediatric and geriatric populations. This course will also include a discussion on topics related to medication safety.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 808

Pharmacotherapeutics Vlll

This course is the eighth of an eight-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy, medicinal chemistry, and pharmacology with active learning sessions involving case discussion in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes and tolerability for patients. This course will focus on agents used in the management of: anemia, coagulation disorders, drug-induced hematologic disorders; oncologic diseases including solid tumors and hematologic malignancies such as cancers of the breast, lung, colon, rectum, prostate, ovaries, skin, and lymphoma, leukemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes. Drugs used in the supportive care of cancer patients will also be a focus including those used to manage nausea and vomiting, constipation, and tumor lysis syndrome.

Prerequisites: None

4.0
PMD 810

Population Based Health Care

Students learn how pharmacists contribute to the delivery of effective, quality health and disease prevention services. Students learn to apply population-specific data, quality assurance strategies, and processes to assure access to rational, safe and cost-effective drug therapy. Students also learn to utilize health-related quality of life measures and decision analyses to assess the health status of individuals in the U.S. healthcare system, and make comparisons to individuals within other global systems. Utilizing the economic and epidemiologic principles learned in class, students critique peer-reviewed public health literature and develop a framework for a group research project that will be completed during the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience of the fourth professional year.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 812

Professional Development of a Student Pharmacist

This is the final course in the six-term sequence. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 814

Evidence-Based Medicine III

Students demonstrate effective communication and organizational skills by preparing, delivering, and evaluating professional seminars.

Prerequisites: None

2.0
PMD 850

Practice IPPE

The focus of this course is to study herbal preparations and other phytomedicinals which are widely used by the general public as self-selected OTC products for therapeutic, preventive or prophylactic purposes. The course will be methodically classified by organ systems (e.g. nervous system, cardiovascular system, digestive system) and its relevant field of application (e.g. depression, anxiety and sleep disorders; congestive heart failure, arteriosclerosis; peptic ulcers, constipation). Emphasis will be placed on herbal constituents and products whose safety and efficacy are based not just on tradition but also on modern scientific testing. The course will further give an introduction into aspects related to safety, herb-d, herb-drug, herb-herb interactions, and quality and efficacy of herbal medicinal products. The role of pharmacists to assist consumers to select the safest, most proper and useful natural remedies will also be considered.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PMD 852/PMD 854/PMD 856

Long Term Care IPPE or A Or B Compounding or International Pharmacy IPPE

1
PMD 8XX

One elective from the 800 level

Choose one elective from PMD 800 level.
2
PMD 860

Professional Development



Prerequisites: None

0.0
PMD 878

MTM IPPE II

Purpose While partaking in the Medication Therapy Management Pharmacy IPPE Rotation the student will gain experience in providing MTM services which is recognized as a growing area in all areas of pharmacy practice. Students will be the learning the fundamentals of the MTM process in both training that involves simulated cases with the potential for real world integration. Students will receive the APhA MTM Training Certificate in the P2 year and successfully complete the required 5 post cases during this IPPE. Goals & Objectives The goal of this IPPE course is to expose the student to the expanding role Pharmacists play in pharmaceutical care with emphasis on the patient care process. The premise and focus will be on addressing Drug Related Problems (DRPS) with documentation of efforts via the MTM platform.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: PMD-877

1.0
Total 18

Fourth Professional Year: Summer, Fall and Spring Semesters

PMD 901 Advanced Practice will consist of 6 six-week rotations.  Each rotation is worth 6-credit hours and requires 240 clock hours, for a total of 1440 clock hours.
1.     (1)  Advanced Community Rotation
2.     (1) Ambulatory Rotation
3.     (1)  Institutional Clinical Rotation
4.     (1)  Institutional Operations Rotation
5.     (1)  Elective A Rotation
6.     (1)  Elective B Rotation   

Course Number Course Name Credits
PMD 901

Advanced Community Pharmacy



Prerequisites: None

6.0
PMD 902

Ambulatory Care Rotation

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience provides practice opportunities that require students to assume responsibility for the outcomes of drug therapy. Students develop mastery of the educational outcomes during five required and two elective rotations. Required rotations include acute care, ambulatory care, advanced institutional pharmacy, advanced community pharmacy and a health and wellness project. Students also choose two elective rotations covering a variety of pharmacy settings, such as long term care, nuclear pharmacy, home infusion, geriatrics, pediatrics, managed care, oncology and psychiatric pharmacy.

Prerequisites: None

6.0
PMD 903

Institutional Clinical Rotation



Prerequisites: None

6.0
PMD 904

Institutional Operations Rotation

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience provides practice opportunities that require students to assume responsibility for the outcomes of drug therapy. Students develop mastery of the educational outcomes during five required and two elective rotations. Required rotations include acute care, ambulatory care, advanced institutional pharmacy, advanced community pharmacy and a health and wellness project. Students also choose two elective rotations covering a variety of pharmacy settings, such as long term care, nuclear pharmacy, home infusion, geriatrics, pediatrics, managed care, oncology and psychiatric pharmacy.

Prerequisites: None

6.0
PMD 905

APPE Elective A

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience provides practice opportunities that require students to assume responsibility for the outcomes of drug therapy. Students develop mastery of the educational outcomes during five required and two elective rotations. Required rotations include acute care, ambulatory care, advanced institutional pharmacy, advanced community pharmacy and a health and wellness project. Students also choose two elective rotations covering a variety of pharmacy settings, such as long term care, nuclear pharmacy, home infusion, geriatrics, pediatrics, managed care, oncology and psychiatric pharmacy.

Prerequisites: None

6.0
PMD 906

APPE Elective B

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience provides practice opportunities that require students to assume responsibility for the outcomes of drug therapy. Students develop mastery of the educational outcomes during five required and two elective rotations. Required rotations include acute care, ambulatory care, advanced institutional pharmacy, advanced community pharmacy and a health and wellness project. Students also choose two elective rotations covering a variety of pharmacy settings, such as long term care, nuclear pharmacy, home infusion, geriatrics, pediatrics, managed care, oncology and psychiatric pharmacy.

Prerequisites: None

6.0
Total 36

Electives include: Disease Prevention Through Lifestyle; Emergency Response; Innovations in Community Pharmacy; Nuclear Pharmacy; Advanced Self-Care; Management and Leadership, Planning and Operations; Substance Abuse; Advanced Therapeutics; Natural Products Therapeutics; Advances in Drug Discovery and Development; etc...

D'Youville's Pharmacy Doctoral Degree

The demand for pharmacists is high and the variety of healthcare settings available to pharmacists allows graduates to chose the role that most interests them. Future D'Youville pharmacists choose the program because it allows them to work one-on-one with professors, practice across disciplines, and learn in a program focused on caring for their communities.


A pharmacist works in the lab.

interprofessional

Pharmacy students at D'Youville learn to work as part of a collaborative healthcare team through Interprofessional Education Labs.

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Shoshanna Zucker, a professor in D'Youville's School of Pharmacy

our faculty

"My research utilizes cell and molecular biology to investigate how oxidative stress can serve as a tool to promote cell death in cancer cells." 

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Chau Nguyen, a professor in D'Youville's School of Pharmacy

our faculty

"I'm specifically interested in better understanding the molecular basis of neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiovascular diseases." 

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Timmy Global Health Chapter

Founded in 2012, it enables student and faculty to travel to conduct 10-day service trips to Ecuador. 

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