Back To Top
Menu

Pharmaceutical Science (BSPS), 4-Year

Test tubes sit on a lab desk.

The 4-year Pharmaceutical Science BS program allows students to learn in traditional science fields like biology and chemistry while expanding their studies into hands-on learning in drug development, research, and marketing.

Overview & Distinctions

Overview

A Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Science (BSPS) prepares students to work in entry-level technical positions in the pharmaceutical, government, and academic research industries. The BSPS program is for anyone interested in a career in drug research and development, pharmaceutical marketing, or drug regulation.

Students in the BSPS program will be exposed to areas such as the chemistry of medicines, drug discovery, product development, and ethical considerations in research and practice. Those enrolled will have opportunities to use basic chemistry, mathematics, and biological training in a wide range of specialized research opportunities in the School of Pharmacy's state-of-the-art research laboratory.

Since the BSPS is an undergraduate degree, graduates with this degree are not eligible for licensure or to practice as a pharmacist without further education. However, graduates often go on to pursue graduate school or progress into professional degree programs such as pharmacy, medicine, allied health, or law.

What You’ll Learn

As a graduate of the BSPS program, you’ll be able to address pressing topics in the pharmacy industry and work in a field meaningful to a significant and growing population. In the BSPS program, you'll study:

Pharmacy Research Methods

Discover how the methods by which drug mechanisms and interactions effect the human body and explore how better and safer products are developed.

Pharmaceutical Marketing and Education

Learn how to speak knowledgeably about pharmaceutical products as you research how the packaging and marketing of drugs effects their usage and success and how the public is educated about issues in pharmacy.

A Diverse Curriculum

At the heart of a D'Youville education is the Core Curriculum where students are given opportunities to explore subjects as they discover interests and develop the deep wealth of knowledge employers are seeking.

Why D'Youville

  • As a student in the Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Science program, you'll benefit from being advised and mentored by D'Youville's experienced, professional School of Pharmacy faculty.
  • BSPS students are automatic members of both the BSPS club and the Pre-Pharmacy Club where they interact with their peers and explore their interests.
  • Students eligible for D'Youville's pre-pharmacy program will have the opportunity to join an established program and begin working with other healthcare majors in hands-on training opportunities in D'Youville's unique interdisciplinary education lab.
  • D'Youville's advanced, modern research labs offer students the chance to get involved in research and interact with members of the pharmacy community working at the forefront of the industry.

Automatic Merit-Based Scholarship Consideration

Bachelor’s of Science in Pharmaceutical Science (BSPS) students are eligible for our generous scholarships, which greatly reduce the cost of tuition, room, and board.

When you apply for admission at D’Youville, we’ll automatically consider you for our merit scholarships. Undergraduate scholarships can cover as much as 50% of your tuition, and there is no need to fill out a separate application!

Transfer students can qualify for scholarships, as well. And unlike other schools, maintaining your scholarship is easier at D'Youville because we use a realistic 2.25 GPA requirement to determine your eligibility for merit-based scholarships each year. 

Check out the chart below to see if you qualify:
Scholarships SAT (M & EBRW) or ACT* / GPA Scholarship Amount
President's 88/1170 or 24 $13,000 + $3,000 Room and Board Waiver
Founder's 83/1080 or 21 $10,000 + $2,000 Room and Board Waiver
Dean's 80/980 or 18
Anyone with a 90 GPA can receive this award without test score consideration.
$8,000
Transfer 3.5+ $5,000
Transfer 3.25 - 3.49 $4,500
Transfer 3.0 - 3.24 $4,000
Transfer 2.75 - 2.99 $3,500

*D'Youville only requires that you submit the results from one test.

Find more information and additional scholarships on our scholarships page.

View All Scholarships

Admissions Requirements

Admissions Requirements

D'Youville selects students who are academically well-rounded and committed to meeting the challenges of a high-quality education. Students entering the BSPS program directly after high school should be prepared to enter into this competitive and rigorous mathematics and science-based degree.

Admission requirements for applicants entering as freshman are as follows:
Admission Requirements
Combined SAT scores of at least 1080 (math and verbal) or ACT equivalent.
A high school average of at least 85 percent, or 2.85 on a 4.0 scale.
High school rank in the upper 50% of class.
Two letters of professional recommendation.
Transfer students are required to have a minimum of C or better in each of the courses for which credit is transferred.

Curriculum

Curriculum

The BSPS program starts with a foundation in mathematics, chemistry, and biology. Coursework progresses into advanced classes including drug discovery and development, pharmaceutical sciences, and bioethics.

D’Youville’s robust liberal arts components allow for electives in humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, and computer science.

Pharmaceutical Sciences
Degree: BS

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
PPS 301

Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences I

Achieving effective treatment of a disease, while minimizing adverse effects of a drug, requires rational selection, formulation and administration of an appropriate dosage form. Drugs are, first and foremost, molecules exhibiting both individual molecular properties, as well as the collective properties of molecules which make up the dose of an administered medication. This course will focus on the basic principles governing molecules, then consider equilibrium and kinetic phenomena and conclude with properties exhibited by dispersed systems such as colloids and dispersions. Information presented in the course will be foundational to subsequent Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences courses, particularly the Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms course.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102 CHE-102L CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L PHY-101 PHY-101L PHY-112 PHY-112L

2.0
PPS 302

Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences II

This second course in the Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences sequence is designed to familiarize students in the BSPS program with general principles of drug action. Topics include an introduction to general terminology, drug-receptor interactions, receptor and ion channels, and second messengers.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L PPS-301, PPS-304 PPS-306

3.0
PPS 304

Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms

The purpose of this course is to provide a foundational knowledge in the concepts of pharmaceutics that are important for the design and function of pharmaceutical dosage forms. The course complements and completes PPS301, and applies pharmaceutics to dosage forms ranging from liquid and solid dosage forms to more complex novel and advanced delivery forms such as products of biotechnology.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L PPS-301, PPS-302 PPS-306

3.0
PPS 306

Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences Practicum

The goal of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to the breadth of techniques used within the laboratories of pharmaceutical scientists. Students will discuss literature pertinent to the faculty member's research, and participate in laboratory activities. Students will complete laboratory safety training, and learn what is involved in planning, conducting and disseminating research.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: MAT-123 PPS-301, PPS-302 PPS-304

2.0
PPS 401

Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences III

The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs is due in large part to the chemical nature of drugs as molecules. This course considers the chemical characteristic of molecules that are important to the development and use of drugs. Topics to be considered include functional group characteristics and roles, drug binding and the effect of stereochemistry on drug action.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L PPS-301 PPS-302, PPS-403 PPS-405

2.0
PPS 402

Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences IV

This course builds upon the Principles of Pharmaceutical Sciences course sequence to describe primary determinants of the disposition of drugs in the body, namely absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME). Rudimentary dosing in response to ADME is calculated, and the impact of factors that may alter pharmacokinetics of drugs is presented in the final portion of the course.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: PPS-301 PPS-302 PPS-401, PPS-404 PPS-406

2.0
PPS 403

Drug Discovery and Development

An understanding of the drug development process will be foundational to the career choice of the student earning the undergraduate degree in pharmaceutical sciences. This course will provide the foundational info, as well as introduce the students to scientists who have chosen to work in industry or academia so that they may informally discuss their career choices and experiences with them.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: PPS-301 PPS-302 PPS-304, PPS-401 PPS-405

2.0
PPS 404

Individualized Medicine: Informatics and Pharmacogenomics

This course focuses on two areas of relevance to the pharmaceutical industry that utilize vast amounts of information from populations (informatics) as well as specific information from individuals (pharmacogenomics) to ultimately lead to more effective and personalized utilization of medicines.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-102 and one (1) 100 level computer science(CSC)course, PPS-402 PPS-406

2.0
PPS 405

Laboratory Research in the Pharmaceutical Sciences I

Critical to students' development as pharmaceutical scientists is the opportunity to conduct research under the guidance of faculty members. Working with the faculty member mutually-selected by the student and faculty advisor, the student is expected to develop a 2-semester hypothesis driven research project, conduct the necessary experiments to address the aims of the research project, and subsequently present the results of the research project in a forum that is open to the members of the department.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: PPS-301 PPS-302 PPS-304 PPS-306, PPS-401 PPS-405

3.0
PPS 406

Laboratory Research in the Pharmaceutical Sciences II

Critical to students' development as pharmaceutical scientists is the opportunity to conduct research under the guidance of faculty members. Working with the faculty member mutually-selected by the student, the student is expected to develop a 2-semester hypothesis driven research project, conduct the necessary experiments to address the aims of the research project, and subsequently present the results of the research project in a forum that is open to the members of the department. This course will complete the requirements for the project initiated in the fall semester.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: PPS-405, PPS-402 PPS-404

3.0
Total 24

In other academic areas required for the major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
CHE 220

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 219. The physical properties, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of aromatic rings, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Amines, carboxylic acids and its derivatives, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromaticity and enols are studied. The theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spec) methods are also covered.

Prerequisites: CHE-219, CHE-220L

3.0
CHE 220L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

This lab emphasizes the reactions that are covered in lecture such as, but not limited to, ester synthesis, electrophilic substitution of an aromatic ring, Grignard reagents and reduction of carbonyl compounds. This lab also places an importance on mastering spectroscopic methods such as IR and NMR utilizing in-house instrumentation. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-219L, CHE-220

1.0
MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prerequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course from PHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L or be a pre-pharmacy student.

4.0
MAT 125

Calculus I

Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or have an SAT Math Sub-score 600+ or ACT 26+.

4.0
PHY 101

General Physics I

This calculus-based course is an introduction to the principles of kinematics and dynamics as they apply to both translational and rotational motion. Topics include Newton's laws, forces, friction, gravity, Kepler's laws, dot products and cross products, potential and kinetic energy, and momentum. Considerable attention is paid to the intellectual history that accompanied the emergence of the Newtonian world view.

Prerequisites: Mat-125, Phy-101L

3.0
PHY 101L

Gen Physics Lab I



Prerequisites: None

1.0
PHY 112

Introduction to Physics

This course is designed for health services/PT majors and for other students who wish to use it to fulfill the core requirement in science. The course lecture must be taken prior to, or concurrently with, the corresponding lab. PHY 111 covers kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum, and rotational motion. PHY 112 covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and ray optics.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or MAT-125

3.0
PHY 112L

Introduction to Physics Lab

This laboratory accompanies the introductory astronomy course. The laboratory work supplements the lectures in PHY 142, focusing on the underlying physics of light, optics, wave motion and planetary motion.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
PHY

PHY 112 and PHY 112L; or PHY 102 and PHY 102L (PHY 102 requires completion of MAT 126 Calculus II as well)

PHY 112 and PHY 112L, or PHY 102 and PHY 102L
4
Total 52
Additional Core Curriculum Requirements

Required professional pharmacy program pre-requisites are shown in parentheses ( ) and/or denoted by asterisk (*).

Humanities
Course Number Course Name Credits
ENG 111

Introduction to Literature: Acad Writing

This course is an introduction to literature and the fundamentals of academic writing. Students learn the skills essential to college success:critical reading and analytical thinking, interpretation, scholarly discussion and collaboration, effective oral presentation, composition of writing for both readers and listeners.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
ENG 112

Liberal Arts Seminar: Research Writing

This course teaches academic research skills and writing based on a liberal arts topic. Topics vary by instructor.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
PHI or RS

PHI 201 or RS 201

3
Total 9

Five courses selected from the following areas with choices made from at least three of the five areas.

Course Number Course Name Credits
LIT

Literature Elective

Any literature course in English or foreign language.

 

3
Fine Arts

Fine Arts Elective

Any other course listed under fine arts, music dance, theatre, speech, or creative writing. SPE 201*

3
PHI

Philosophy Elective

Any course. PHI 214*

3
RS

Religious Studies Elective

Any course. RS 312*

3
Foreign Language

Foreign Language Elective

Any course.

3
Total 15
Social Sciences

Four courses are required, one from each of the following areas:

Course Number Course Name Credits
SOC/PSY

SOC 101 or PSY 101 (either course accepted as a prerequisite)

SOC 101 or PSY 101 (either course accepted as a prerequisite)

 

3
HIS

HIS 103, HIS 111, HIS 203*, or HIS 204

3
ECO/PSC

ECO 201 or ECO 202 (either course accepted as a pre-requisite); or PSC 201

ECO 201 or ECO 202 (either course accepted as a pre-requisite); or PSC 201

3
Total 9
Computer Science
Course Number Course Name Credits
CSC

Computer Science Elective

One 100-level course is required.
3
Total 3

Electives
Course Number Course Name Credits
Electives

Free Electives

Three courses outside the requirements for the major are also required.
9
Total 9

Totals

Requirement Credits
Major Requirements (Specific Area of Concentration) 26
Major Requirements (Other Academic Areas) 52
Core Requirements and Free Electives 39-48
Total 120
 

Careers

Careers

The Bachelor of Science in Pharmaceutical Science (BSPS) program offers students a science-based education compounded with a rich, liberal arts education to create well-rounded, knowledgeable graduates. Graduates of the program will have immediate opportunities to join the pharmaceutical industry in technical positions or to further their study through advanced degrees.

Career outlooks for graduates with a pharmacy background are enhanced by a growing demand for pharmaceutical products and specialists and the following facts: 

Explore D'Youville and the School of Pharmacy Through Video