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Pre-Professional Science (BS), 4-Year

Students in Professor Silvu Faitar's research lab.

Are you interested in a career in the medical field? D'Youville's pre-professional BS program provides highly-motivated students with deep preparation for careers in healthcare.

Overview & Distinctions

Overview

Entry into a professional program is often a rigorous and strict process. D’Youville’s Pre-Professional Bachelor of Science program prepares motivated students to enter the professional program of their choice.

As a student in the pre-professional BS program, you will gain direct, practical experience in the profession you are preparing for through summer programs, internships, and volunteer activities.

Students in this program have opportunities to explore advanced degrees at D’Youville or prepare for careers in:

  • chiropractic medicine
  • dentistry
  • medicine
  • pharmacy
  • physical therapy
  • physician assisting
  • podiatry
  • veterinary medicine

Early Acceptance Programs

  • Incoming freshmen at D'Youville can earn a doctoral degree in pharmacy (PharmD) in just six years through the Pre-Pharmacy (Early Assurance) Program.
  • Enter our dual degree program in Chiropractic as a freshman. Earn a bachelor's degree in biology plus your doctoral degree (DC) in just seven years.
  • Through DYC's partnership with Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (LECOM), high school seniors and current DYC freshmen & sophomores in the biology program can qualify for an early acceptance program at LECOM Dental or College of Medicine.

Why Choose D'Youville?

  • Benefit from direct entry into one of D'Youville's joint and combined professional degree programs. You can earn a highly-respected bachelor's and doctoral degree here at D'Youville in less time than you can at other institutions. After you earn your Bachelor of Science degree, as long as you’ve maintained the necessary academic standards you’ll be automatically admitted to the doctoral program — no reapplying and no GREs required!
  • Ace your graduate or professional school entrance exams with D'Youville's in-house review course. Students at other colleges often pay $1,000 or more to take similar courses from commercial firms. If you're unsure about a career path, your assigned faculty advisor will help you explore your options.
  • Get individualized attention in small classes, usually around 20 students, and not more than 40. Science labs range from 12 to 15 students per class.
  • 100% of classes at D'Youville College are taught by faculty, not teaching assistants.
  • D'Youville College's long commitment to a liberal education means that you'll receive the kind of interdisciplinary education that will give you a rock-solid foundation. Gain skills like problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and written, visual, and oral communication — all skills that employers believe are critical to success, no matter what career path you decide to take.

Automatic Merit-based Scholarship Consideration

When you apply for admission at D’Youville, we’ll automatically consider you for our merit scholarships. Undergraduate scholarships can cover as much as 50% of your tuition, and there is no need to fill out a separate application!

Transfer students can qualify for scholarships, as well. And unlike other schools, maintaining your scholarship is easier at D'Youville because we use a realistic 2.25 GPA requirement to determine your eligibility for merit-based scholarships each year. 

Check out the chart below to see if you qualify:
Scholarships SAT (M & EBRW) or ACT* / GPA Scholarship Amount
President's 88/1170 or 24 $13,000 + $3,000 Room and Board Waiver
Founder's 83/1080 or 21 $10,000 + $2,000 Room and Board Waiver
Dean's 80/980 or 18
Anyone with a 90 GPA can receive this award without test score consideration.
$8,000
Transfer 3.5+ $5,000
Transfer 3.25 - 3.49 $4,500
Transfer 3.0 - 3.24 $4,000
Transfer 2.75 - 2.99 $3,500

*D'Youville only requires that you submit the results from one test.

Find more information and additional scholarships on our scholarships page.

View All Scholarships

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

First Time Freshmen

D'Youville selects students who are academically well-rounded and committed to meeting the challenges of a high-quality education. If you have been successful in a traditional college preparatory program in high school, you should be well-prepared for the academic challenges at D'Youville.

Students entering D'Youville as a freshman must meet the following minimum entrance criteria:
High School Average SAT + (or) ACT
80 980 19

+ Score is based on the new SAT score format which went into effect in March 2016.

Our admitted freshman class profile:

High school average: 85% attained a B or better
Class rank: 87% of students in the top 50 percent of their class or higher
Test Scores 25th Percentile 75th Percentile Median
SAT Evidence-based Reading and Writing* 460 590 530
SAT Math* 510 590 550
SAT Composite* 1010 1180 1090
ACT Composite* 21 25 23

*These scores reflect the new SAT score format, which went into effect in March 2016.

Transfer students

Students entering D'Youville as a transfer student must meet the following entrance criteria:

Criteria for Admission: Transfer students with a 2.5 cumulative GPA or higher will be considered for admission.

Average Cumulative GPA: 3.26

Review the steps to apply for admission to D'Youville as a transfer student.

Curriculum

CURRICULUM

Students entering our program as Freshmen should follow the curriculum guidelines below. The curriculum requirements for transfer students will vary depending on prior learning and/or experience.

Pre-Professional Science
Degree: B.S.

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 302

Genetics

This is an examination of the principles of classic and molecular genetics. Topics discussed include Mendel’s contribution, linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA and RNA; bacterial and viral genetics, gene function, mutation, regulation of gene activity, recombinant DNA technology and quantitative and population genetics. Laboratory experiments with Drosophila, bacteria and fungi demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L. Must have a minimum of a 2.2 GPA., BIO-302L

4.0
BIO 302L

Genetics Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-302

0.0
BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prerequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or be a chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3.0
BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303 lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prerequisites: BIO-303

1.0
BIO 312

Molecular Cell Biology

This is a detailed analysis of cellular organelles in relation to active transport, endocytosis, cell-to-cell communications, cell development and protein synthesis. Chromosome organization, gene structure, RNA synthesis and regulation of gene expression are also considered. Discussions will emphasize techniques and key experiments that have helped in the development and formulation of contemporary concepts. This course consists of three hours of lectures and one discussion hour a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: 1 of (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-108 BIO-108L), BIO-303 BIO-303L

4.0
Total 20

Biology electives chosen from: (18 credits)

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO -107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: Bio-208
0
BIO 216

Marine Biology

This is an introduction to the life of the seas. It begins with basic information about the chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. All major marine communities are surveyed, Including coastal zones and estuaries, coral reefs, the open ocean and the exotic communities of the deep sea. Extra attention is given to special topics of particular importance or interest. The final section concerns human interactions with the marine world and threats that they pose to it.

Prerequisites: BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 218

Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on their diverse patterns of form and function. Coverage of each group includes its distinguishing characteristics and patterns of adaptations for coping with the needs of life by following examples of selected species. Basic biological principles and special impacts on humans are discussed when appropriate. In the laboratory, live and preserved specimens from marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats are used to explore aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-218L

4.0
BIO 218L

Invertebrate Zoology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-218

0.0
BIO 229

Ecology

This is a broad introduction to the basic concepts of ecology as they pertain to population, evolutionary processes, communities and ecosystems. Several current environmental problems are explored in the light of these concepts. Laboratory includes a mix of lab and field exercises designed to put lecture topics into practice. The course consists of three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-229L

4.0
BIO 229L

Ecology Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-229

0.0
BIO 242

Evolution

Evolution is the single most unifying theory in the biological sciences. This course traces the beginnings of Darwinian-Wallace evolution by natural selection and places this theory in historical perspective. Current evidences of evolution are given and explained and evolution at the gene level is discussed. The emphasis of the course is on biological and biochemical adaptations to changing environments. Some limited treatment of population genetics is included.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 304

Microscopic Anatomy

This course examines the organ systems of the body microscopically. The development, histology, histophysiology and histopathology of the tissues and organs of the body will be presented in lecture. The lab incorporates microscopic examination of the organ systems and training in processing of tissue for imaging and instruction in the use of imaging equipment. The course consists of two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (BIO-101, BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO 102L) or (BIO-107, BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L), BIO-304L

4.0
BIO 304L

Microscopic Anatomy Lab

This course examines the organ systems of the body microscopically. The development, histology, histophysiology and histopathology of the tissues and organs of the body will be presented in lecture. The lab incorporates microscopic examination of the organ systems and training in processing of tissue for imaging and instruction in the use of imaging equipment. The course consists of two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (BIO-101, BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO 102L) or (BIO-107, BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L), BIO-304

0.0
BIO 309

Virology

This course is the study of structure and activity of animal, plant and bacterial viruses. This course is three lectures.

Prerequisites: BIO-303

3.0
BIO 310

Immunology

Individuals are continually exposed to foreign substances (antigens) and respond to them in ways that are both harmful and beneficial. Many areas of biology use the in vitro techniques of immunology. Thus, immunology integrates such diverse fields as genetics, biochemistry, physiology and medicine and is relevant for biology and health science students alike. The purpose of this course is therefore to introduce the student to the chemistry of antigens and antibodies, the biology of the immune response, including both harmful and beneficial aspects in the function of the cells, organs and molecules of the immune system. Immunologic techniques and their applications will also be examined.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101 BIO-101L ,BIO-102, BIO-102L) OR BIO-107, (BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L) AND CHE-101,CHE-102, (BIO-101 BIO-101L ,BIO-102, BIO-102L) OR BIO-107, (BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L) AND CHE-101,CHE-102

3.0
BIO 317

Comparative Anatomy

This is a study of vertebrates and their chordate origins, including an overview emphasizing their historical relationships. The major systems, such as integument, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, and skeletal, are presented with examples from the major vertebrate groups. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317L, (BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 317L

Comparative Anatomy Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317

0.0
BIO 320

Developmental Biology

This is a study of the principles of development and their application to animal and plant embryos, regeneration, metamorphosis, cancer and related processes. The laboratory includes observation and experimentation with living animal and plant material, plant tissue culture, and examination of prepared slides. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-320L, BIO-101 BIO 101L BIO-102 BIO 102L, BIO-302

4.0
BIO 320L

Dev Biology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-320

0.0
BIO 335

Pharmacology I

This series integrates the principles and mechanisms of action and drug effect with the pharmacotherapy of common disease and syndromes.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 336

Pharmacology II

This course is a continuation of Bio 335

Prerequisites: BIO-335

3.0
BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will take BIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6.0
BIO 339L

Gross Anat Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-339

0.0
BIO 389-390

Special Topics in Biology

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.
3-4
BIO 407-410

Research

Library or laboratory research problems are carried out under the direction of staff members on campus.
1-3
BIO 479-480

Independent Study

Qualified students may investigate selected topics with permission of the instructor.
1-3
Total 18

In other academic areas required for the major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
CHE 220

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 219. The physical properties, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of aromatic rings, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Amines, carboxylic acids and its derivatives, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromaticity and enols are studied. The theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spec) methods are also covered.

Prerequisites: CHE-219, CHE-220L

3.0
CHE 220L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

This lab emphasizes the reactions that are covered in lecture such as, but not limited to, ester synthesis, electrophilic substitution of an aromatic ring, Grignard reagents and reduction of carbonyl compounds. This lab also places an importance on mastering spectroscopic methods such as IR and NMR utilizing in-house instrumentation. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-219L, CHE-220

1.0
MAT 125

Calculus I

Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or have an SAT Math Sub-score 600+ or ACT 26+.

4.0
MAT 126

Calculus II

The course explores the basic techniques for integration as well as elementary transcendental functions and the applications of differential and integral calculus.

Prerequisites: MAT-125

4.0
PHY 101

General Physics I

This calculus-based course is an introduction to the principles of kinematics and dynamics as they apply to both translational and rotational motion. Topics include Newton's laws, forces, friction, gravity, Kepler's laws, dot products and cross products, potential and kinetic energy, and momentum. Considerable attention is paid to the intellectual history that accompanied the emergence of the Newtonian world view.

Prerequisites: Mat-125, Phy-101L

3.0
PHY 101L

Gen Physics Lab I



Prerequisites: None

1.0
PHY 102

General Physics

This course is a continuation of PHY 101. The course covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and geometric optics.

Prerequisites: Phy-101, Mat-126, Phy-102L

3.0
PHY 102L

Gen Physics Lab II

This course is a physics laboratory to accompany PHY 103. The course includes experiments in mechanics and oscillatory motion.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
Total 32

Major requirements: 70
Other core requirements: 39
Free electives (including core electives): 11
Total: 120

Careers

Careers

A degree in pre-professional science opens the door to many careers. It can equip you for graduate school and lead to a teaching or research career at a college or university. It may provide the foundation for a career as a doctor, dentist or veterinarian. It can also lead to a teaching position at a high school or prepare you for related occupations in business, industry and government.

Benefit from direct entry into one of D'Youville's joint and combined professional degree programs. You can earn a highly-respected bachelor's and doctoral degree here at D'Youville in less time than you can at other institutions. After you earn your Bachelor of Science degree, as long as you’ve maintained the necessary academic standards you’ll be automatically admitted to the doctoral program…no reapplying and no GREs required!

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