Back To Top
Menu

Biology (BA or BS), 4-Year

Professor Frank Stephen teaching an anatomy class

A bachelor's degree in biology offers a fundamental education in life sciences that can be a stepping stone to a vast array of careers, including pharmacist, dentist, physical and occupational therapist, and many others, even doctor.

Overview & Distinctions

Overview

Graduates in biology can also directly enter industry in related jobs in healthcare or environmental companies. Or if you are interested in teaching biology at the middle school, high school or college level, a bachelor's degree is the right start.

As a Biology major at D'Youville, you'll benefit from hands-on experience in anatomy through dissection of human cadavers in our state-of-the-art gross anatomy laboratory. Typically, courses like this are taught in the first year of medical or dental school. D'Youville is one of the very few institutions to offer gross anatomy courses for undergraduate students.

Starting in your junior or senior year, you'll have the opportunity to conduct paid research under the supervision alongside scientists at collaborating institutions like the world-renowned Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Few biology programs offer these types of exceptional undergraduate research opportunities.

BA or BS options

The Biology major offers two degree options:

Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biology

  • More extensive program that will prepare students for careers in science or medicine.
  • Meets the admissions requirements of graduate programs in biological specialties, as well as medical, dental, veterinary and chiropractic schools.
  • This program is linked to our joint and combined degrees in Chiropractic, Physical Therapy and Anatomy.

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Biology

  • Allows students preparing for non-traditional career tracks to acquire a strong foundation in biology, while also developing skills in other areas
  • Requires fewer courses in mathematics, chemistry, and physics than the BS degree.
  • This program is linked to our combined degree in Anatomy.
  • Meets the admissions requirements of some graduate programs, including education.
  • Many D'Youville students enroll in this major as they apply to our Physician Assistant program.

Why Choose D'Youville?

  • Benefit from direct entry into one of D'Youville's joint and combined professional degree programs. You can earn a highly-respected bachelor's and doctoral degree here at D'Youville in less time than you can at other institutions. After you earn your Bachelor of Science degree, as long as you’ve maintained the necessary academic standards you’ll be automatically admitted to the doctoral program.
  • Ace your graduate or professional school entrance exams with D'Youville's in-house review course. Students at other colleges often pay $1,000 or more to take similar courses from commercial firms. If you're unsure about a career path, your assigned faculty advisor will help you explore your options.
  • Get individualized attention in small classes, usually around 20 students, and not more than 40. Science labs range from 12 to 15 students per class.
  • 100% of classes at D'Youville are taught by faculty, not teaching assistants.
  • D'Youville's long commitment to a liberal education means that you'll receive the kind of interdisciplinary education that will give you a rock-solid foundation. Gain skills like problem solving, critical thinking, collaboration, and written, visual, and oral communication — all skills that employers believe are critical to success, no matter what career path you decide to take.
  • Gain international experience and perspective with our one of a kind study abroad experience in Italy, where you'll explore the history of anatomy through curated museum tours and private anatomy collections.

Automatic Merit-Based Scholarships

When you apply for admission at D’Youville, we’ll automatically consider you for our merit scholarships. Undergraduate scholarships can cover as much as 50% of your tuition, and there is no need to fill out a separate application!

Transfer students can qualify for scholarships, as well. And unlike other schools, maintaining your scholarship is easier at D'Youville because we use a realistic 2.25 GPA requirement to determine your eligibility for merit-based scholarships each year. 

Check out the chart below to see if you qualify:
Scholarships SAT (M & EBRW) or ACT* / GPA Scholarship Amount
President's 88/1170 or 24 $13,000 + $3,000 Room and Board Waiver
Founder's 83/1080 or 21 $10,000 + $2,000 Room and Board Waiver
Dean's 80/980 or 18
Anyone with a 90 GPA can receive this award without test score consideration.
$8,000
Transfer 3.5+ $5,000
Transfer 3.25 - 3.49 $4,500
Transfer 3.0 - 3.24 $4,000
Transfer 2.75 - 2.99 $3,500

*D'Youville only requires that you submit the results from one test.

Find more information and additional scholarships on our scholarships page.

View All Scholarships

Admission Requirements

Admission Requirements

First Time Freshmen

D'Youville selects students who are academically well-rounded and committed to meeting the challenges of a high-quality education. If you have been successful in a traditional college preparatory program in high school, you should be well-prepared for the academic challenges at D'Youville.

Students entering D'Youville as a freshman must meet the following minimum entrance criteria:

Biology (BA) Requirements

High School Average SAT + (or) ACT
80 980 19

Biology (BS) Requirements

High School Average SAT + (or) ACT
85 1080 21

 

+ Score is based on the new SAT score format which went into effect in March 2016.

Our admitted freshman class profile:

High school average: 85% attained a B or better
Class rank: 87% of students in the top 50 percent of their class or higher
Test Scores 25th Percentile 75th Percentile Median
SAT Evidence-based Reading and Writing* 460 590 530
SAT Math* 510 590 550
SAT Composite* 1010 1180 1090
ACT Composite* 21 25 23

*These scores reflect the new SAT score format, which went into effect in March 2016.

Transfer students

Students entering D'Youville as a transfer student must meet the following entrance criteria:

Criteria for Admission: Transfer students with a 2.5 cumulative GPA or higher will be considered for admission.

Average Cumulative GPA: 3.26

Review the steps to apply for admission to D'Youville as a transfer student.

Biology BA Curriculum

Biology BA Curriculum

Biology
Degree: B.A.

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 302

Genetics

This is an examination of the principles of classic and molecular genetics. Topics discussed include Mendel’s contribution, linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA and RNA; bacterial and viral genetics, gene function, mutation, regulation of gene activity, recombinant DNA technology and quantitative and population genetics. Laboratory experiments with Drosophila, bacteria and fungi demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L. Must have a minimum of a 2.2 GPA., BIO-302L

4.0
BIO 302L

Genetics Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-302

0.0
BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prerequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or be a chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3.0
BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303 lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prerequisites: BIO-303

1.0
BIO 312

Molecular Cell Biology

This is a detailed analysis of cellular organelles in relation to active transport, endocytosis, cell-to-cell communications, cell development and protein synthesis. Chromosome organization, gene structure, RNA synthesis and regulation of gene expression are also considered. Discussions will emphasize techniques and key experiments that have helped in the development and formulation of contemporary concepts. This course consists of three hours of lectures and one discussion hour a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: 1 of (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-108 BIO-108L), BIO-303 BIO-303L

4.0
Total 20

Biology electives chosen from: (14 credits)

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO -107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-208

0
BIO 216

Marine Biology

This is an introduction to the life of the seas. It begins with basic information about the chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. All major marine communities are surveyed, Including coastal zones and estuaries, coral reefs, the open ocean and the exotic communities of the deep sea. Extra attention is given to special topics of particular importance or interest. The final section concerns human interactions with the marine world and threats that they pose to it.

Prerequisites: BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 218

Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on their diverse patterns of form and function. Coverage of each group includes its distinguishing characteristics and patterns of adaptations for coping with the needs of life by following examples of selected species. Basic biological principles and special impacts on humans are discussed when appropriate. In the laboratory, live and preserved specimens from marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats are used to explore aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-218L

4.0
BIO 218L

Invertebrate Zoology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-218

0.0
BIO 229

Ecology

This is a broad introduction to the basic concepts of ecology as they pertain to population, evolutionary processes, communities and ecosystems. Several current environmental problems are explored in the light of these concepts. Laboratory includes a mix of lab and field exercises designed to put lecture topics into practice. The course consists of three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-229L

4.0
BIO 229L

Ecology Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-229

0.0
BIO 230

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230L

4.0
BIO 230L

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230

0.0
BIO 231

Environmental Geology

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resources, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231L

4.0
BIO 231L

Environmental Geology Lab

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resouces, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231

0.0
BIO 242

Evolution

Evolution is the single most unifying theory in the biological sciences. This course traces the beginnings of Darwinian-Wallace evolution by natural selection and places this theory in historical perspective. Current evidences of evolution are given and explained and evolution at the gene level is discussed. The emphasis of the course is on biological and biochemical adaptations to changing environments. Some limited treatment of population genetics is included.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 304

Microscopic Anatomy

This course examines the organ systems of the body microscopically. The development, histology, histophysiology and histopathology of the tissues and organs of the body will be presented in lecture. The lab incorporates microscopic examination of the organ systems and training in processing of tissue for imaging and instruction in the use of imaging equipment. The course consists of two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (BIO-101, BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO 102L) or (BIO-107, BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L), BIO-304L

4.0
BIO 304L

Microscopic Anatomy Lab

This course examines the organ systems of the body microscopically. The development, histology, histophysiology and histopathology of the tissues and organs of the body will be presented in lecture. The lab incorporates microscopic examination of the organ systems and training in processing of tissue for imaging and instruction in the use of imaging equipment. The course consists of two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (BIO-101, BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO 102L) or (BIO-107, BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L), BIO-304

0.0
BIO 309

Virology

This course is the study of structure and activity of animal, plant and bacterial viruses. This course is three lectures.

Prerequisites: BIO-303

3.0
BIO 310

Immunology

Individuals are continually exposed to foreign substances (antigens) and respond to them in ways that are both harmful and beneficial. Many areas of biology use the in vitro techniques of immunology. Thus, immunology integrates such diverse fields as genetics, biochemistry, physiology and medicine and is relevant for biology and health science students alike. The purpose of this course is therefore to introduce the student to the chemistry of antigens and antibodies, the biology of the immune response, including both harmful and beneficial aspects in the function of the cells, organs and molecules of the immune system. Immunologic techniques and their applications will also be examined.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101 BIO-101L ,BIO-102, BIO-102L) OR BIO-107, (BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L) AND CHE-101,CHE-102, (BIO-101 BIO-101L ,BIO-102, BIO-102L) OR BIO-107, (BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L) AND CHE-101,CHE-102

3.0
BIO 314

Botany

This course is a survey of biology of plants with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, physiology and the importance to man. This course is three lectures and three hours of lab.

Prerequisites: BIO-314L, BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

4.0
BIO 317

Comparative Anatomy

This is a study of vertebrates and their chordate origins, including an overview emphasizing their historical relationships. The major systems, such as integument, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, and skeletal, are presented with examples from the major vertebrate groups. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317L, (BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 317L

Comparative Anatomy Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317

0.0
BIO 320

Developmental Biology

This is a study of the principles of development and their application to animal and plant embryos, regeneration, metamorphosis, cancer and related processes. The laboratory includes observation and experimentation with living animal and plant material, plant tissue culture, and examination of prepared slides. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-320L, BIO-101 BIO 101L BIO-102 BIO 102L, BIO-302

4.0
BIO 320L

Dev Biology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-320

0.0
BIO 330

Environmental Microbiology

This course and required laboratory will focus on microbes, their biochemistry and their interactions with higher animals in specific ecologies. Microbes play a primary,and often overlooked, role in every ecosystem on Earth. The unique biochemistries of these microbes are responsible for a wealth of activities critical to human and planetary health,including oxygen generation,carbon and nitrogen bioavailability,bioremediation of pollutants, decomposition of organic matter,nutrient cycling and human sanitation. This course is not intended as the required course in a health sciences major as it eschews medical microbes in favor of environmentally or commercially important microorganisms. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Four (4) credits of college level chemistry., BIO-330L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L or (BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 330L

Environmental Microbiology Lab

This course and required Laboratory will focus on microbes, their biochemistry and their interactions with higher animals in specific ecologies. Microbes play a primary, and often overlooked, role in every ecosystem on Earth. The unique biochemistries of these microbes are responsible for a wealth of activities critical to human and planetary health, including; oxygen generation, carbon and nitrogen bioavailability, bioremediation of pollutants, decomposition of organic matter,nutrient cycling and human sanitation. This course is not intended as the required course a health sciences major as it eschews medical microbes in favor of environmentally or commercially important microorganisms. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and 3 hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO-330

0.0
BIO 331

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology combines ecology, physiology, molecular biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology in order to conserve biological diversity. It is the aim of conservation biology to understand the human threats to biodiversity and prevent any further loss. Topics covered will include, defining, measuring, and patterns of biodiversity, the negative effect of habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, over population, and over harvesting on biodiversity, strategies used to combat threats and sustain biodiversity and consideration of economic and ethical tradeoffs in the conservation of threatened species. Special attention will be paid to current issues related to biodiversity. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L and (BIO-102 BIO-102L or BIO-303 BIO-30L or CHE-303 CHE-303L), BIO-331L

4.0
BIO 331L

Conservation Biology Lab

Lab for BIO-331

Prerequisites: BIO-331

0.0
BIO 332

Environmental Health

Environmental health examines the impact of the environment on human health. This includes 1) the effect of environmental components, such as pollutants, pathogens, and toxins, on human health, 2) energy resource uses and its effect on human health, 3) food safety, 4) environmental hazards found in the work place, and 5) environmental degradation as it relates to human health and wellbeing. This course will also examine the methods of environmental assessment and the role of public policy related to environmental health.

Prerequisites: (CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102 CHE-102L) or (CHE-111 CHE-112 CHE-113), BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 335

Pharmacology I

This series integrates the principles and mechanisms of action and drug effect with the pharmacotherapy of common disease and syndromes.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 336

Pharmacology II

This course is a continuation of Bio 335

Prerequisites: BIO-335

3.0
BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will take BIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6.0
BIO 339L

Gross Anat Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-339

0.0
BIO 350

Fund of Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics

This course will offer an introduction into the novel disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, providing students with a solid intellectual framework for understanding biological pathways, networks and molecular systems in an integrated, multidisciplinary fashion. The course will follow an interactive, problem-based instructional approach, using several mathematics exercises that utilize statistical and probability calculations to add quantitative rigor to the interpretation of biological data sets. The course will be based on case studies taken from scientific publications and Internet-based bioinformatics tools will be used for data analysis. The content will include all major areas of biology, including DNA and protein sequences, microarrays, and systems biology.

Prerequisites: BIO-303 and MAT-125., any CSC (Computer Science) course., BIO-350L

3.0
BIO 351

Computational Biology

Description of BIO 351 should be same as the printed catalog: This course and required lab are intended to serve as an introduction to the problems encountered in modern biology research, with a special focus on the usage of modern computer-dependent techniques to explain biological phenomena. Many modern biological studies are hindered by the sheer volume of experimental data produced. These data often cannot be efficiently or accurately interpreted without computer assistance, yet many scientists lack the necessary skill set to do so. This course will instruct students in the challenges of designing, implementing and analyzing in vivo or in vitro generated experimental results using in silico techniques. This will be accomplished through a project-based learning format. This course requires three hours of lecture a week and a weekly three hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO/CHE-303 or permission of the instructor., BIO-351L

4.0
BIO 351L

Computational Biology Lab

Lab to accompany BIO 351

Prerequisites: BIO-351

0.0
BIO 375

Math Modeling in Biology

Techniques for expressing biological molecules and concepts as mathematical expressions for analysis and comparison.

Prerequisites: MAT-125 and (BIO-102 or BIO-303), 1 computer science (CSC or IT) course. CSC-151 or IT-111 is recommended.

3.0
BIO 389-90

Special Topics in Biology

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.
3-4
BIO 407-410

Research

Library or laboratory research problems are carried out under the direction of staff members on campus.
1-3
BIO 479-480

Independent Study

Qualified students may investigate selected topics with permission of the instructor.
1-3
BIO 480

Special Topics

Qualified students may investigate selected topics with permission of the instructor.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: None

1.0
BIO 659

Advanced Physiology I

These courses are comprised of discussions of the molecular attributes of cytological features that represent the underpinnings of such functions as nerve impulse and neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, cardiac muscle excitation and coordination of contraction, processes of electrolyte and water balance, actions of chemical messengers such as hormones and drugs, gas transport and cellular respiration, nutrition, metabolism and excretion.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
BIO 660

Advanced Physiology II

These courses are comprised of discussions of the molecular attributes of cytological features that represent the underpinnings of such functions as nerve impulse and neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, cardiac muscle excitation and coordination of contraction, processes of electrolyte and water balance, actions of chemical messengers such as hormones and drugs, gas transport and cellular respiration, nutrition, metabolism and excretion.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 101-106

In other academic areas required for the major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
*MAT

One Elective from MAT 117, MAT 120, MAT 122, MAT 123, MAT 125 or MAT 389

3
Total 15

Major requirements: 49-50
Other core requirements: 39
Free electives (including core electives): 31-32
Total: 120

Biology
Degree: B.A. for Health Professions Preparation

(Preparation for Physician Assistant B.S./M.S. Please note: Matriculation into the P.A. program requires application, interview and acceptance.)

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 302

Genetics

This is an examination of the principles of classic and molecular genetics. Topics discussed include Mendel’s contribution, linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA and RNA; bacterial and viral genetics, gene function, mutation, regulation of gene activity, recombinant DNA technology and quantitative and population genetics. Laboratory experiments with Drosophila, bacteria and fungi demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L. Must have a minimum of a 2.2 GPA., BIO-302L

4.0
BIO 302L

Genetics Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-302

0.0
*BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prerequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or be a chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3.0
*BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303 lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prerequisites: BIO-303

1.0
BIO 312

Molecular Cell Biology

This is a detailed analysis of cellular organelles in relation to active transport, endocytosis, cell-to-cell communications, cell development and protein synthesis. Chromosome organization, gene structure, RNA synthesis and regulation of gene expression are also considered. Discussions will emphasize techniques and key experiments that have helped in the development and formulation of contemporary concepts. This course consists of three hours of lectures and one discussion hour a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: 1 of (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-108 BIO-108L), BIO-303 BIO-303L

4.0
Total 20

Biology electives including:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO -107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.  
4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: Bio-208

0
BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will take BIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6.0
BIO 339L

Gross Anat Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-339

0.0
Total 18

In other academic areas required for the major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
+MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prerequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course from PHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L or be a pre-pharmacy student.

4.0
Total 16

Health Professions preparation option (B.S./M.S. in physician assistant preparation):

Course Number Course Name Credits
+PHI 214

Challenges of Death

This course examines the ways that death challenges human meaning and action. Topics include the meaning of suffering and death, challenges of death to morality, psychological spiritual processes of dying and bereavement are considered.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
+PHI 312

Bioethics Seminar

This course analyzes ethical dilemmas and problems posed by developments in the biosciences. Problems discussed include choices for life or death, allocation of resources, human experimentation, reproductive technologies and professional-client relationships.

Prerequisites: PHI-201 or PHI/RS-214

3.0
*BIO 307

Pathophysiology

This is a study of disease processes as disturbances of the body's homeostasis. The body's defense mechanisms and their breakdown are emphasized. Various clinical assessment methods are discussed. The course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107,BIO-107L BIO-108,BIO-108L (CHE-111,CHE-112) or (CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102 CHE-102L) Chiropractic students can take BIO-507L BIO-508L BIO-659 BIO-660

3.0
+PSY 203

Developmental Psychology

This course explores milestones of physical,cognitive and psychosocial development from conception through old age. Emphasis is placed on global principles that guide human growth and change across the lifespan. The course meets the core requirement in psychology.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 12

+Fulfills core curriculum requirements.
*Must be taken at D'Youville.

Major Masters in P.A. preparation (BIO BA degree): 54
Other core requirements: 30
Pre-P.A. option: 12
Free electives: 24
Total: 120

Biology BS Curriculum

Biology BS Curriculum

Biology
Degree: B.S. for Health Professions Preparation (D.P.T)

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 302

Genetics

This is an examination of the principles of classic and molecular genetics. Topics discussed include Mendel’s contribution, linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA and RNA; bacterial and viral genetics, gene function, mutation, regulation of gene activity, recombinant DNA technology and quantitative and population genetics. Laboratory experiments with Drosophila, bacteria and fungi demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L. Must have a minimum of a 2.2 GPA., BIO-302L

4.0
BIO 302L

Genetics Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-302

0.0
*BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prerequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or be a chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3.0
*BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303 lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prerequisites: BIO-303

1.0
BIO 312

Molecular Cell Biology

This is a detailed analysis of cellular organelles in relation to active transport, endocytosis, cell-to-cell communications, cell development and protein synthesis. Chromosome organization, gene structure, RNA synthesis and regulation of gene expression are also considered. Discussions will emphasize techniques and key experiments that have helped in the development and formulation of contemporary concepts. This course consists of three hours of lectures and one discussion hour a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: 1 of (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-108 BIO-108L), BIO-303 BIO-303L

4.0
Total 20

Biology electives including:

Course Number Course Name Credits
*BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
*BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
*BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
*BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
Total 8

Biology electives for majors: 10

In other academic areas required for the major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
*CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
*CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
*CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
*CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
*CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
*CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
*CHE 220

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 219. The physical properties, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of aromatic rings, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Amines, carboxylic acids and its derivatives, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromaticity and enols are studied. The theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spec) methods are also covered.

Prerequisites: CHE-219, CHE-220L

3.0
*CHE 220L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

This lab emphasizes the reactions that are covered in lecture such as, but not limited to, ester synthesis, electrophilic substitution of an aromatic ring, Grignard reagents and reduction of carbonyl compounds. This lab also places an importance on mastering spectroscopic methods such as IR and NMR utilizing in-house instrumentation. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-219L, CHE-220

1.0
MAT 125

Calculus I

Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or have an SAT Math Sub-score 600+ or ACT 26+.

4.0
MAT 126

Calculus II

The course explores the basic techniques for integration as well as elementary transcendental functions and the applications of differential and integral calculus.

Prerequisites: MAT-125

4.0
*PHY 101

General Physics I

This calculus-based course is an introduction to the principles of kinematics and dynamics as they apply to both translational and rotational motion. Topics include Newton's laws, forces, friction, gravity, Kepler's laws, dot products and cross products, potential and kinetic energy, and momentum. Considerable attention is paid to the intellectual history that accompanied the emergence of the Newtonian world view.

Prerequisites: Mat-125, Phy-101L

3.0
*PHY 101L

Gen Physics Lab I



Prerequisites: None

1.0
*PHY 102

General Physics

This course is a continuation of PHY 101. The course covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and geometric optics.

Prerequisites: Phy-101, Mat-126, Phy-102L

3.0
*PHY 102L

Gen Physics Lab II

This course is a physics laboratory to accompany PHY 103. The course includes experiments in mechanics and oscillatory motion.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
Total 32

Health Professions preparation option (D.P.T. preparation):

Course Number Course Name Credits
*SOC 101

Principles of Sociology

This course examines interactions among individuals and groups within institutions. Attention is paid to the role of the state and the super-state in perpetuating social stratification in both North America and globally,and how unequal power relations organize society and shape identities. The ways in which individuals negotiate their lives in different social and economic contexts are also considered. Fundamental sociological concepts are investigated, such as culture,socialization, stratification,social structure,social institutions,and social interactions.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
*PSY 101

General Psychology

This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include biology of behavior,sensation and perception consciousness, learning and memory,intelligence,motivation and emotion, stress and personality.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
*HSM 203

Medical Terminology

This course applies medical terminology including word components (root word, prefix and suffix), medical abbreviations, pathologies and diagnostic tests. Students also learn how to conduct a chart review, interpret admission notes, surgical reports, discharge summaries, and understand the components of a SOAP note.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
*MAT 123

Introduction to Applied Statistics

This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression,confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results. Not open to those who have taken MAT 120

Prerequisites: one computer science course or take 1 course from PHY-101L PHY-103L or PHY-111L or be a pre-pharmacy student.

4.0
Total 11

*Denotes specific prerequisite coursework requiring a minimum grade of B and a G.P.A. of 3.20 to enter the D.P.T. graduate program. Of the four chemistry courses, only the best two must be considered for the prerequisite G.P.A.

Major Biology B.S. and D.P.T. preparation: 70
Health Professions option (D.P.T.): 11
Core requirements (in addition to course subsumed above): 33
Free electives (including core electives: 6
Total: 120

Biology
Degree: B.S. for Pre-Med, Pre-Veternarian, Pre-Dental, Pre-Pharmacy, and Pre-Chiropractic

Course Requirements for the Major:

In the specific areas of concentration:

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 101

Introductory Biology I

The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry; and surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of d and water in plants. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101L

4.0
BIO 101L

Intro Bio Lab I

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: Bio-101

0.0
BIO 102

Introductory Biology II

The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. Introductory classic and molecular genetics is also covered. A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102l

4.0
BIO 102L

Intro Bio Lab II

A three-hour lab accompanies the above lecture. Intended for biology majors and minors.

Prerequisites: BIO-102

0.0
BIO 302

Genetics

This is an examination of the principles of classic and molecular genetics. Topics discussed include Mendel’s contribution, linkage, gene mapping, structure and function of DNA and RNA; bacterial and viral genetics, gene function, mutation, regulation of gene activity, recombinant DNA technology and quantitative and population genetics. Laboratory experiments with Drosophila, bacteria and fungi demonstrate principles discussed in the lecture. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L. Must have a minimum of a 2.2 GPA., BIO-302L

4.0
BIO 302L

Genetics Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-302

0.0
BIO 303

Biochemistry

This one-semester course emphasizes structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. Topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition. This course is cross-listed with CHE 303.

Prerequisites: 1 group: (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (CHE-219 CHE-219L BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or be a chemistry major and take (CHE-219 CHE-219L CHE-220 CHE-220L), BIO-303L

3.0
BIO 303L

Biochemistry Laboratory

This laboratory supports BIO 303 lecture course. Students required to take BIO 303 are also required to take BIO 303L (except for physician assisting students).

Prerequisites: BIO-303

1.0
BIO 312

Molecular Cell Biology

This is a detailed analysis of cellular organelles in relation to active transport, endocytosis, cell-to-cell communications, cell development and protein synthesis. Chromosome organization, gene structure, RNA synthesis and regulation of gene expression are also considered. Discussions will emphasize techniques and key experiments that have helped in the development and formulation of contemporary concepts. This course consists of three hours of lectures and one discussion hour a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: 1 of (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-108 BIO-108L), BIO-303 BIO-303L

4.0
Total 20

Biology electives chosen from: (18 credits)

Course Number Course Name Credits
BIO 107

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

This is a study of the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system, muscular system, nervous system and sense organs. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, 1 semester of college chemistry., BIO-107L

3.0
BIO 107L

Human Anatomy & Physiology Laboratory

This course accompanies BIO 107. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-107

1.0
BIO 108

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

This continuation of BIO 107 emphasizes the digestive system, respiratory system, blood, cardiovascular system, urinary system, reproductive systems, endocrine system, human genetics and development. This course consists of three lectures a week.

Prerequisites: CPC-022, Prior completion of BIO-107/L, BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 108L

Human Anatomy & Physiology II Lab

This course accompanies BIO 108. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-108

1.0
BIO 208

Microbiology

This course is an introduction to the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial and eukaryote microorganisms as well as viruses. Pathogens associated with human disease are used to illustrate these general concepts. Methods used by microbes to resist antimicrobial drugs, transfer antimicrobial resistance and methods used to control the growth of microorganisms are also discussed. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses. The means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents are also discussed. In the laboratory, students gain skills in sterile technique, stain procedures and biochemical tests used to characterize bacteria. Methods used to control microbial growths are also studied. The course consists of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L) or (BIO-107,BIO -107L,BIO-108,BIO-108L), Bio-208L, 2 semesters of college chemistry or take CHE-114.

4
BIO 208L

Microbiology Lab

This course accompanies BIO 208. This course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: Bio-208
0
BIO 216

Marine Biology

This is an introduction to the life of the seas. It begins with basic information about the chemical, physical and geological nature of the oceans. All major marine communities are surveyed, Including coastal zones and estuaries, coral reefs, the open ocean and the exotic communities of the deep sea. Extra attention is given to special topics of particular importance or interest. The final section concerns human interactions with the marine world and threats that they pose to it.

Prerequisites: BIO-101,BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 217

Animal Handling

This course covers the fundamentals of domestic animal behavior, nutritional, physiology and welfare in relation to animal handling. Students will study how to assess welfare and how behavior plays an important role in mitigation and diagnosis of disease. This course is designed for majors and non-majors and will satisfy a WIP requirement, however biology majors wishing to use it toward their major electives must also take the accompanying laboratory BIO 217L as a co-requisite.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L) or (BIO-105 BIO-105L) and achieve a minimum grade of B

3.0
BIO 218

Invertebrate Zoology

This is a survey of the major invertebrate groups with emphasis on their diverse patterns of form and function. Coverage of each group includes its distinguishing characteristics and patterns of adaptations for coping with the needs of life by following examples of selected species. Basic biological principles and special impacts on humans are discussed when appropriate. In the laboratory, live and preserved specimens from marine, freshwater and terrestrial habitats are used to explore aspects of anatomy, physiology and behavior. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-218L

4.0
BIO 218L

Invertebrate Zoology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-218

0.0
BIO 229

Ecology

This is a broad introduction to the basic concepts of ecology as they pertain to population, evolutionary processes, communities and ecosystems. Several current environmental problems are explored in the light of these concepts. Laboratory includes a mix of lab and field exercises designed to put lecture topics into practice. The course consists of three lectures and three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L, BIO-229L

4.0
BIO 229L

Ecology Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-229

0.0
BIO 230

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230L

4.0
BIO 230L

Foundations of Environmental Science

This course examines the interactions between the physical, chemical, and biological components of the environment and human populations. Topics to be included but not limited to the course are 1)the impact of human activities on air and water quality, 2)the use of natural resources including renewable and non-renewable energy sources, minerals and biological resources,3)conservation and biodiversity, and 4)land use including wildlife, fisheries and forest management, recreational uses and agriculture. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory. The laboratory portion of the course will examine present practices and problems associated with environmental issues through field trips and laboratory/field experiments.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-230

0.0
BIO 231

Environmental Geology

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resources, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231L

4.0
BIO 231L

Environmental Geology Lab

This course and required laboratory is designed to be an introduction to Environmental Geology through a broad survey of topics which are interconnected by society and geologic processes. These topics include Earth systems, geosphere materials, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, rivers and flooding, land stability, coastal change, water, soil, mineral and energy resouces, climate changes and human environmental impact. Laboratory experiences will be related to the course objectives and will include offsite experiences. Prerequisite: BIO 101/L and (BIO 102/L OR BIO 303/L). Offered each spring semester as needed.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-303 BIO-303L), BIO-231

0.0
BIO 242

Evolution

Evolution is the single most unifying theory in the biological sciences. This course traces the beginnings of Darwinian-Wallace evolution by natural selection and places this theory in historical perspective. Current evidences of evolution are given and explained and evolution at the gene level is discussed. The emphasis of the course is on biological and biochemical adaptations to changing environments. Some limited treatment of population genetics is included.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 304

Microscopic Anatomy

This course examines the organ systems of the body microscopically. The development, histology, histophysiology and histopathology of the tissues and organs of the body will be presented in lecture. The lab incorporates microscopic examination of the organ systems and training in processing of tissue for imaging and instruction in the use of imaging equipment. The course consists of two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (BIO-101, BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO 102L) or (BIO-107, BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L), BIO-304L

4.0
BIO 304L

Microscopic Anatomy Lab

This course examines the organ systems of the body microscopically. The development, histology, histophysiology and histopathology of the tissues and organs of the body will be presented in lecture. The lab incorporates microscopic examination of the organ systems and training in processing of tissue for imaging and instruction in the use of imaging equipment. The course consists of two lectures and four hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: (BIO-101, BIO-101L,BIO-102,BIO 102L) or (BIO-107, BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L), BIO-304

0.0
BIO 309

Virology

This course is the study of structure and activity of animal, plant and bacterial viruses. This course is three lectures.

Prerequisites: BIO-303

3.0
BIO 310

Immunology

Individuals are continually exposed to foreign substances (antigens) and respond to them in ways that are both harmful and beneficial. Many areas of biology use the in vitro techniques of immunology. Thus, immunology integrates such diverse fields as genetics, biochemistry, physiology and medicine and is relevant for biology and health science students alike. The purpose of this course is therefore to introduce the student to the chemistry of antigens and antibodies, the biology of the immune response, including both harmful and beneficial aspects in the function of the cells, organs and molecules of the immune system. Immunologic techniques and their applications will also be examined.

Prerequisites: (BIO-101 BIO-101L ,BIO-102, BIO-102L) OR BIO-107, (BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L) AND CHE-101,CHE-102, (BIO-101 BIO-101L ,BIO-102, BIO-102L) OR BIO-107, (BIO-107L,BIO-108, BIO-108L) AND CHE-101,CHE-102

3.0
BIO 314

Botany

This course is a survey of biology of plants with emphasis on taxonomy, morphology, physiology and the importance to man. This course is three lectures and three hours of lab.

Prerequisites: BIO-314L, BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

4.0
BIO 317

Comparative Anatomy

This is a study of vertebrates and their chordate origins, including an overview emphasizing their historical relationships. The major systems, such as integument, muscular, nervous, endocrine, circulatory, and skeletal, are presented with examples from the major vertebrate groups. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317L, (BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L) or (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 317L

Comparative Anatomy Lab

The course consists of three laboratory hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-317

0.0
BIO 320

Developmental Biology

This is a study of the principles of development and their application to animal and plant embryos, regeneration, metamorphosis, cancer and related processes. The laboratory includes observation and experimentation with living animal and plant material, plant tissue culture, and examination of prepared slides. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.
Offered in: Spring Only
Prerequisites: BIO-320L, BIO-101 BIO 101L BIO-102 BIO 102L, BIO-302

4.0
BIO 320L

Dev Biology Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-320

0.0
BIO 330

Environmental Microbiology

This course and required laboratory will focus on microbes, their biochemistry and their interactions with higher animals in specific ecologies. Microbes play a primary,and often overlooked, role in every ecosystem on Earth. The unique biochemistries of these microbes are responsible for a wealth of activities critical to human and planetary health,including oxygen generation,carbon and nitrogen bioavailability,bioremediation of pollutants, decomposition of organic matter,nutrient cycling and human sanitation. This course is not intended as the required course in a health sciences major as it eschews medical microbes in favor of environmentally or commercially important microorganisms. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory.
Offered in: Fall Only
Prerequisites: Four (4) credits of college level chemistry., BIO-330L, (BIO-102 BIO-102L or (BIO-108 BIO-108L)

4.0
BIO 330L

Environmental Microbiology Lab

This course and required Laboratory will focus on microbes, their biochemistry and their interactions with higher animals in specific ecologies. Microbes play a primary, and often overlooked, role in every ecosystem on Earth. The unique biochemistries of these microbes are responsible for a wealth of activities critical to human and planetary health, including; oxygen generation, carbon and nitrogen bioavailability, bioremediation of pollutants, decomposition of organic matter,nutrient cycling and human sanitation. This course is not intended as the required course a health sciences major as it eschews medical microbes in favor of environmentally or commercially important microorganisms. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and 3 hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO-330

0.0
BIO 331

Conservation Biology

Conservation Biology combines ecology, physiology, molecular biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology in order to conserve biological diversity. It is the aim of conservation biology to understand the human threats to biodiversity and prevent any further loss. Topics covered will include, defining, measuring, and patterns of biodiversity, the negative effect of habitat loss, invasive species, pollution, over population, and over harvesting on biodiversity, strategies used to combat threats and sustain biodiversity and consideration of economic and ethical tradeoffs in the conservation of threatened species. Special attention will be paid to current issues related to biodiversity. This course requires a weekly 3 hour lecture and a 3 hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L and (BIO-102 BIO-102L or BIO-303 BIO-30L or CHE-303 CHE-303L), BIO-331L

4.0
BIO 331L

Conservation Biology Lab

Lab for BIO-331

Prerequisites: BIO-331

0.0
BIO 332

Environmental Health

Environmental health examines the impact of the environment on human health. This includes 1) the effect of environmental components, such as pollutants, pathogens, and toxins, on human health, 2) energy resource uses and its effect on human health, 3) food safety, 4) environmental hazards found in the work place, and 5) environmental degradation as it relates to human health and wellbeing. This course will also examine the methods of environmental assessment and the role of public policy related to environmental health.

Prerequisites: (CHE-101 CHE-101L CHE-102 CHE-102L) or (CHE-111 CHE-112 CHE-113), BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L

3.0
BIO 335

Pharmacology I

This series integrates the principles and mechanisms of action and drug effect with the pharmacotherapy of common disease and syndromes.

Prerequisites: BIO-101 BIO-101L BIO-102 BIO-102L

3.0
BIO 336

Pharmacology II

This course is a continuation of Bio 335

Prerequisites: BIO-335

3.0
BIO 339

Human Gross Anatomy

This is a lecture and laboratory course in human gross anatomy, which uses cadaver dissection and other materials illustrative of human anatomy. Emphasis will be placed upon the anatomy of skeletal muscles, including their bony attachments, nerve and blood supply and their functions in movements. Additional dissections will involve a survey of abdominal and thoracic organs, anatomy of the head and contents of the cranial cavity. The course consists of two lecture hours and eight lab hours a week.

Prerequisites: BIO-339L. Physician Assistant students will take BIO-639L., (BIO-107 BIO-107L BIO-108 BIO-108L) or BIO-317.

6.0
BIO 339L

Gross Anat Lab



Prerequisites: BIO-339

0.0
BIO 350

Fund of Genomics, Proteomics & Bioinformatics

This course will offer an introduction into the novel disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics, providing students with a solid intellectual framework for understanding biological pathways, networks and molecular systems in an integrated, multidisciplinary fashion. The course will follow an interactive, problem-based instructional approach, using several mathematics exercises that utilize statistical and probability calculations to add quantitative rigor to the interpretation of biological data sets. The course will be based on case studies taken from scientific publications and Internet-based bioinformatics tools will be used for data analysis. The content will include all major areas of biology, including DNA and protein sequences, microarrays, and systems biology.

Prerequisites: BIO-303 and MAT-125., any CSC (Computer Science) course., BIO-350L

3.0
BIO 351

Computational Biology

Description of BIO 351 should be same as the printed catalog: This course and required lab are intended to serve as an introduction to the problems encountered in modern biology research, with a special focus on the usage of modern computer-dependent techniques to explain biological phenomena. Many modern biological studies are hindered by the sheer volume of experimental data produced. These data often cannot be efficiently or accurately interpreted without computer assistance, yet many scientists lack the necessary skill set to do so. This course will instruct students in the challenges of designing, implementing and analyzing in vivo or in vitro generated experimental results using in silico techniques. This will be accomplished through a project-based learning format. This course requires three hours of lecture a week and a weekly three hour laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIO/CHE-303 or permission of the instructor., BIO-351L

4.0
BIO 351L

Computational Biology Lab

Lab to accompany BIO 351

Prerequisites: BIO-351

0.0
BIO 375

Math Modeling in Biology

Techniques for expressing biological molecules and concepts as mathematical expressions for analysis and comparison.

Prerequisites: MAT-125 and (BIO-102 or BIO-303), 1 computer science (CSC or IT) course. CSC-151 or IT-111 is recommended.

3.0
BIO 389-390

Special Topics in Biology

This course presents an opportunity to study a selected topic in the biological sciences. Topics can originate with faculty or students.
3-4
BIO 407-410

Research

Library or laboratory research problems are carried out under the direction of staff members on campus.
1-3
BIO 479-480

Independent Study

Qualified students may investigate selected topics with permission of the instructor.
1-3
BIO 659

Advanced Physiology I

These courses are comprised of discussions of the molecular attributes of cytological features that represent the underpinnings of such functions as nerve impulse and neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, cardiac muscle excitation and coordination of contraction, processes of electrolyte and water balance, actions of chemical messengers such as hormones and drugs, gas transport and cellular respiration, nutrition, metabolism and excretion.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
BIO 660

Advanced Physiology II

These courses are comprised of discussions of the molecular attributes of cytological features that represent the underpinnings of such functions as nerve impulse and neurotransmission, skeletal muscle contraction, cardiac muscle excitation and coordination of contraction, processes of electrolyte and water balance, actions of chemical messengers such as hormones and drugs, gas transport and cellular respiration, nutrition, metabolism and excretion.

Prerequisites: None

3.0
Total 103-108

In other academic areas required for the major:

Course Number Course Name Credits
CHE 101

General Chemistry I

This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three lectures and three hours of laboratory a week.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry and CPC-022 or 3 years of high school mathematics or MAT-117 or MAT-122, CHE-101L

3.0
CHE 101L

General Chemistry Laboratory

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101

1.0
CHE 102

General Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation reduction systems.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-102L

3.0
CHE 102L

General Chemistry Laboratory II

Three hours of laboratory.

Prerequisites: CHE-101L, CHE-102

1.0
CHE 219

Organic Chemistry

This course is a survey of the functional groups germane to organic chemistry. In particular, emphasis is placed on the physical properties, nomenclature, conformation, synthesis and reactions of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes. Additionally, the recognition of isomers from constitutional stereoisomers such as enantiomers and diastereomers is also stressed.

Prerequisites: CHE-101, CHE-101L, CHE-102, CHE-102L, CHE-219L

3.0
CHE 219L

Organic Chemistry Lab

This lab emphasizes purification techniques central to organic chemistry such as recrystallization, distillation (simple and fractional), extraction, chromatography (column and thin layer), and chemical modification. Also, several syntheses are chosen to illustrate lecture material such as, but not limited to reactions such as substitution and bond cleavage. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-209 or CHE-219

1.0
CHE 220

Organic Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHE 219. The physical properties, nomenclature, synthesis and reactions of aromatic rings, alcohols, aldehydes and ketones. Amines, carboxylic acids and its derivatives, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, conjugated systems, aromaticity and enols are studied. The theory and application of a variety of spectroscopic (infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spec) methods are also covered.

Prerequisites: CHE-219, CHE-220L

3.0
CHE 220L

Organic Chemistry II Lab

This lab emphasizes the reactions that are covered in lecture such as, but not limited to, ester synthesis, electrophilic substitution of an aromatic ring, Grignard reagents and reduction of carbonyl compounds. This lab also places an importance on mastering spectroscopic methods such as IR and NMR utilizing in-house instrumentation. It consists of three hours of lab a week.

Prerequisites: CHE-219L, CHE-220

1.0
MAT 125

Calculus I

Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

Prerequisites: MAT-122 or have an SAT Math Sub-score 600+ or ACT 26+.

4.0
MAT 126

Calculus II

The course explores the basic techniques for integration as well as elementary transcendental functions and the applications of differential and integral calculus.

Prerequisites: MAT-125

4.0
PHY 101

General Physics I

This calculus-based course is an introduction to the principles of kinematics and dynamics as they apply to both translational and rotational motion. Topics include Newton's laws, forces, friction, gravity, Kepler's laws, dot products and cross products, potential and kinetic energy, and momentum. Considerable attention is paid to the intellectual history that accompanied the emergence of the Newtonian world view.

Prerequisites: Mat-125, Phy-101L

3.0
PHY 101L

Gen Physics Lab I



Prerequisites: None

1.0
PHY 102

General Physics

This course is a continuation of PHY 101. The course covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and geometric optics.

Prerequisites: Phy-101, Mat-126, Phy-102L

3.0
PHY 102L

Gen Physics Lab II

This course is a physics laboratory to accompany PHY 103. The course includes experiments in mechanics and oscillatory motion.

Prerequisites: None

1.0
Total 32

Major requirements: 70
Other core requirements: 39
Free electives (including core electives): 11
Total: 120

Careers

Careers

A degree in biology opens the door to many careers. It can equip you for graduate school and lead to a teaching or research career at a college or university. It may provide the foundation for a career as a doctor, dentist or veterinarian. It can also lead to a teaching position at a high school or prepare you for related occupations in business, industry and government.

We offer two Biology bachelor's degree programs to suit your specific career goals:

Bachelor of Science (BS) in Biology

  • More extensive program that will prepare students for careers in science or medicine or biological research.
  • Meets the admissions requirements of graduate programs in biological specialties, as well as medical, dental, veterinary and chiropractic schools.

Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Biology

  • Prepares you to work immediately in biology or a biomedical field.
  • Meets the admissions requirements of some graduate programs, including education.

Internships

Internships

The Department of Biology and Mathematics strongly encourages students to perform research internships as part of the completion of their undergraduate degree. Our friendly and engaging faculty has a diverse set of research interests, ranging from bioinformatics and analytics to animal behavior and human anatomy, so finding the research project that sparks your curiosity couldn’t be easier.

Research projects engage students in new and exciting scientific discoveries that allow them to gain knowledge and experience that is beneficial in applying to graduate programs.

Involvement in research as an undergraduate doesn’t just end at the bench – students from Department of Biology and Mathematics have presented their data in local, national, and international meetings. These experiences help to broaden the horizons of our students and to develop contacts and relationships with researchers from around the globe.

Alumni Successes

Alumni Successes

Many of our graduates continue their academic studies after they earn their bachelor's degree in biology. Some even conduct research as PhD candidates in doctoral programs around the country. 

  • Jamal Williams '15 has degrees in Math and Biology and is now in graduate school at Buffalo State College.
  • Robert Kubiak '15 has degrees in Biology and Chemistry and is now working on a PhD at Emory University.
  • Scott Heller '14 has a degree in Biology and is now in medical school at the University at Buffalo.
  • David Truong '14 has a Biology degree and is now studying to be a Physician Assistant.
  • Cecelia Lignos '14 has a Biology degree and is now an Account Executive at Cumulus Media.
  • Ashley Adamo '13 has a bachelor's degree in Biology. Her research experience as a student helped her become the Clinical Research Coordinator at DENT Neurological Institute.
  • Dr. O'Dane Brady '12 has degrees in Biology, Chiropractic, and Health Services Administration from D'Youville. He is currently treating patients in South Africa through the World Spine Care Organization.
  • Krista Pundt '11 is working on a PhD in Pharmacology and Therapeutics at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.
  • Sister Patricia Kunene '11 is teaching Biology and Physical Science to grades 10-12 in South Africa.
  • Dr. Caitlin Pietrosanto '11 has a bachelor's Degree in Biology and a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from D'Youville. She has a chiropractic practice in New York City.
  • Kristin Smith '10 is continuing her education at D'Youville and is close to finishing a doctorate in Physical Therapy.
  • Benjamin Binga '10 has accepted a position as a Biotech Production Specialist at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.
  • Zack Wintrob '09 is pursuing a PhD in Pharmaceutical Sciences at University at Buffalo.
  • Melissa Hurwitz '08 is completing postgraduate work at the New York College of Podiatry.
  • Dr. Remona Rhooms '07 attended Royal Veterinary College in the UK and now works as a veterinarian at Animal Care and Control in Brooklyn.
  • Kwadwo Bediako '07 was accepted into Pharmacy school and admitted into the Master's program in Biochemistry at Johns Hopkins University.
  • Lamin Trawally '07 was accepted into the doctoral program in Biochemistry at the University at Buffalo.
  • Dr. Kathleen Over '06 has a Biology degree and a Doctor of Chiropractic degree from D'Youville. She is currently practicing in Williamsville, NY.
  • Karen Grinnen '06 was accepted into four Pharm D programs after completing her bachelor's Degree in Biology.
  • Dawn Snyder '05 graduated with a BA in Biology and a Master's Degree in Education from D'Youville.
  • Tracy Travis '05 graduated with a BS in Biology and also earned a master's Degree in Education in 2006.
  • Lindsay Olsen '05 graduated with a BS in Biology and earned her Physician Assistant degree in 2007.
  • Michael Cole '05 started with a BS in Biology and went on to earn a master's Degree in Physical Therapy at D'Youville in 2008.
  • Dr. Anna Vuori '05 graduated with a BS in Biology at D'Youville and went on to obtain her Medical Doctorate at the Brighton-Sussex Medical College in the UK. She currently practices in Finland.
  • Hoang Nguyen '05 graduated with a BS in Biology and obtained his Medical Doctorate at the University of St. Louis Medical School. He did a residency in Internal Medicine at Washington University and is pursuing a specialty in Pediatrics.
  • Petra Link '04 is a research associate at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.
  • Dr. Ryan Maine '04 received his DDS from the Dental School at the University at Buffalo.
  • Michael Gannon '04 achieved candidacy for a PhD in Organic Chemistry at SUNY Buffalo in 2007.
  • Dr. Tracy Guidard '03 graduated from the Dental School at University at Buffalo in 2007.
  • Todd Rhodes '03 pursued his MBA at University at Buffalo after attending D'Youville.
  • Dr. Matthew Strom '02 successfully defended his doctoral thesis in Oceanography at the University of Delaware at Lewes and accepted a position in the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C..
  • Dr. Joel Sebastian '94 received his MD from University at Buffalo, completed his residency at Westchester, and received a fellowship in Minimally Invasive Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. He currently practices at the Hallifax Health Center in Daytona Beach, Florida. He performs general, laparoscopic, and bariatric surgeries. He was featured on September 22, 2009 in a live webcast by ORLive.com.
  • Randy Seitz '94 completed his BA in Biology at D'Youville and MBA at Clarion University. He is now the President/CEO at Penn-Northwest Development Corporation.
  • Dr. Kevin Faber '93 was an honors graduate at D'Youville. His thesis centered on the neuroanatomy of vision. He completed his residency in Neurology at the University of Iowa Medical Center. He started his practice at Merit Care in Fargo, ND in July 2007. He specializes in sleep studies.

Admissions Events

View all Events