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Faculty Spotlight: Marta Werner

Columns on the Montante Library

Marta Werner, profesor of English at D'Youville, connects with online students through interpretting the sounds of their written vocies. 

Marta Werner, PhD

Professor of English

Liberal Arts

Two sites especially draw me — the archive and the natural world — along with two modes of research —documentary and experiential.

Marta Werner

While my research resides largely within the precincts of the 19th century, I’m also interested in 17th-19th-century American literature, 19th-21st-century poetics, the history of the book, the library and the reader, textual scholarship, literature and the environment, soundscape studies, and the non-human turn.

In addition to my work on Emily Dickinson’s writings, particularly with her late poems, letters, and fragments, I have worked on the private journals of Nathaniel and Sophia Hawthorne, on the birding notebooks of Cordelia Stanwood and on the weather journals of Sabra Snell.

Teaching and learning online involves a kind of telepathy — intercepting and reading signals from a distance.

Currently, I’m gathering the materials for a public listening project, titled “‘These Tested Our Horizon: Listening to Dickinson’s Birds from the Shores of the Anthropocene,” that seeks to recreate, albeit always incompletely, some of the sounds from the thin upper layer of the poet’s world.

DYC Insights

I am the editor-in-chief of Textual Cultures, the journal of the Society for Textual Scholarship.
I teach almost exclusively online, and I enjoy getting to know my students through the sounds of their written voices. Teaching and learning online involves a kind of telepathy — intercepting and reading signals from a distance.

Marta Werner, PhD
Department of Liberal Arts

English, BA

Learn more about the Bachelor of Arts degree in English from D'Youville.

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