Curriculum Structure

First Pre-Professional Year, Fall Semester

Course Number Title Credit
BIO 101/101L Introductory Biology and Lab 4.0
CHE101/101L General Chemistry and Lab 4.0
MAT 125 (a) Calculus I 4.0
ENG 111 English Communication 3.0
Total Credit   15.0

a. MAT 126 Calculus II is required if taking PHY101/101L and PHY102/102L General Physic I/II & lab. These three courses are required for the DYC BS in biology degree and represent the only difference between a traditional BIO BS track and the pre-pharmacy entrance requirements. 

First Pre-Professional Year, Spring Semester

Course Number Title Credit
BIO 102/102L Introductory Biology and Lab 4.0
CHE 102/102L General Chemistry and Lab 4.0
ENG 112 English Communication 3.0
HIS 203 (b) American Economic and Social History to 1865 3.0
Total Credit   14.0

b. Can be substituted with HIS 204 American Economic and Social History Since 1865 or HIS 111 Growth of Western Culture.

Second Pre-Professional Year, Fall Semester

Course Number Title Credit
CHE219/219L Organic Chemistry I and Lab 4.0
PHY101/101L (c) General Physics and Lab 4.0
MAT 123 (d) Introduction to Applied Statistics 4.0
BIO 208/208L Microbiology and lab 4.0
PSY 101 (e) General Psychology 3.0
Total Credit   19.0

c. Can be substituted with PHY111/111L Introduction to Physics and Lab; meets and exceeds physics requirement.
d. Can be substituted by MAT 404 Mathematical Statistics; meets and exceeds statistics requirement.
e. Can be substituted with SOC 101 Principles of Sociology or SOC 102 Social Problems.

Second Pre-Professional Year, Spring Semester

Course Number Title Credit
CHE220/220L Organic Chemistry II and Lab 4.0
PHY 112/112L (f) Introduction to Physics and Lab 4.0
SPE 201 Public Speaking 3.0
ECO 201/ 202 Principles of Economics Macro or Micro 3.0
  Humanity Elective (g) 3.0
Total Credit   17.0

f. Can be substituted with PHY102/102L General Physics and lab.
g. Recommended: PHI 201 Ethics in Theory and Action or PHI 214 Challenges of Death or RS 201 Religion and Social Responsibility or PHI 312 Bioethics.

Introductory Biology (BIO 101/101L)
The lecture topics included are origins of life, prebiotic chemistry, surveys of the major plant, invertebrate and vertebrate phyla. The course also includes evolutionary principles governing taxonomic criteria and the physiology of movement of food and water in plants. A lab accompanies the above lecture.

General Chemistry (CHE101/101L)
This introduction to fundamental chemical principles includes topics such as atomic structure, bonding and properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions. The course consists of three hours of laboratory a week.

Calculus I (MAT 125)
Basic theory of functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and integrals are taught. Some emphasis is placed on the structure of the real number system.

English Communication (ENG 111)
This basic freshman English course includes theory and practice in writing, the development of skills in interpreting literature and practice in oral presentations.

Introductory Biology (BIO 102/102L)
The lecture topics include a survey of the cell, its chemical constituents and its organelles, energy metabolism and photosynthesis. A lab accompanies the above lecture.

General Chemistry (CHE 102/102L)
This course is a continuation of Chemistry 101. Topics include chemical equilibria, kinetics and oxidation-reduction systems.

Calculus II (MAT 126)
This course explores the basic techniques for integration as well as elementary transcendental functions and the applications of differential and integral calculus.

English Communication (ENG 112)
This basic freshman English course includes theory and practice in writing, the development of skills in interpreting literature and practice in oral presentations.

American Economic and Social History to 1865 (HIS 203)
This is a course that examines the economic, social and cultural events that shaped American history from colonial times to 1865. Attention is given to race relations and problems of minority groups.

American Economic and Social History Since 1865 (HIS 204)
This is a course that examines the economic, social and cultural events that shaped American history from 1865 times to present. Attention is given to race relations and problems of minority groups.

Growth of Western Culture (HIS 111)
This course is a survey of the development of Western culture as divided into seven major epochs: Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the 19th century and the 20th century.

Organic Chemistry (CHE 219/219L)
This is a survey of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons and their functional derivatives. The lab explores the preparation and purification of organic substances.

Introduction to Physics (PHY 111/111L)
This course is designed for health sciences/PT majors and for other students who wish to use it to fulfill the core requirement in science. Lecture must be taken prior to or concurrently with corresponding lab. PHY 111 covers kinematics, dynamics, conservation of energy and momentum and rotational motion.

General Physics (PHY101/101L)
This calculus-based course is an introduction to the principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, sound, wave theory, light, electricity and magnetism.

Introduction to Applied Statistics (MAT 123)
This course includes the underlying fundamental mathematical principles and their application to a wide range of statistical methods and tests. Included are the following: sampling, frequency distributions, probability, regression, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test, analysis of variance, chi-square and correlation. Existent computer software such as MiniTab is utilized by students to aid and facilitate the analysis of results.

Mathematical Statistics (MAT 404)
The theory of the mathematics of statistics; sampling distributions; point and interval estimation; theory and application of testing hypotheses, regression and correlation will all be covered in this course.

Microbiology (BIO 208/208L)
This is an introduction to the classification, morphology and physiology of microorganisms, particularly of bacteria and viruses with laboratory emphasis on sterile technique, cultural characteristics and physiology of bacteria.

General Psychology (PSY 101)
This course is an overall survey of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include the biology of behavior, sensation and perception, consciousness, learning and memory, intelligence, motivation and emotion, stress and personality.

Principles of Sociology (SOC 101)
This course deals with the subject matter and scope of sociology, fundamental concepts, basic social institutions and the fundamental processes of group interaction.

Organic Chemistry II (CHE 220/220L)
This course is a continuation of CHE219. The lab applies modern synthetic techniques to the preparation of a variety of organic compounds.

Introduction to Physics (PHY 112/112L)
This is a continuation of PHY 111. PHY 112 covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sounds and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism and ray optics.

General Physics (PHY 102/102L)
This course is a continuation of PHY 101. The course covers statics, fluids, oscillations, sound and waves, temperature and heat, electricity and magnetism, and geometric optics.

Public Speaking (SPE 201)
This is an introduction to speaking before groups and includes techniques of speech preparation and delivery, adapting to the purpose of the speaking situation, and practice in various types of oral presentation in a comfortable workshop atmosphere.

Principles of Economics - Micro (ECO 202)
This course explores supply and demand and elasticity of supply and demand. It analyzes the degree and nature of competition in various market structures, the economic benefits derived from and the problems presented by big business conglomerates and multinationals and international trade and finance.

Ethics in Theory and Action (PHI 201)
This course is an examination of human conduct and responsibility and the relationships between individuals and society.

Challenges of Death (PHI 214)
This course examines the ways that death challenges human meaning and action. Topics include the meaning of suffering and death, challenges of death to morality, psychological spiritual processes of dying and bereavement.

Religion and Social Responsibility (RS 201)
The nature and principles of religious ethics in the Judeo-Christian tradition are explored with emphasis on historical and contemporary attitudes of religion toward social responsibility. Topics for discussion include: sexuality, identity, power, violence, war, racism and medical ethics.

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