PharmD Curriculum

First Professional Year – Fall Semester

Course # Title Credit
PMD 601 Biochemical Principles I 3.0
PMD 603 Anatomy/Physiology/Pathophysiology I 4.0
PMD 605 Principles of Drug Action I 4.0
PMD 607 Profession of Pharmacy and Health Care Systems 2.0
PMD 611 Introduction to Collaborative Learning 2.0
PMD 613 Patient Assessment I 1.0
PMD 615 IPPE I A or B 2.0
Total   16 + 2

First Professional Year – Spring Semester

Course # Title Credit
PMD 707 Self Care 3.0
PMD 604 Anatomy/Physiology/Pathophysiology II 4.0
PMD 606 Principles of Drug Action II 5.0
PMD 610 Health Communications, Diversity and Bioethics 2.0
PMD 612 Collaborative Learning Practicum II 1.0
PMD 614 Patient Assessment II 1.0
PMD 616 IPPE I A or B 2.0
Total   16 + 2

Second Professional Year – Fall Semester

Course # Title Credit
PMD 701 Principles of Drug Action III 2.0
PMD 703 Pharmacotherapeutics I - Renal and Urologic Disorders, and Fluids and Electrolytes 4.0
PMD 705 Pharmacotherapeutics II - Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disorders 4.0
PMD 602 Pharmacogenomics 3.0
PMD 709 Integrated Compounding and Practice 3.0
PMD 711 Collaborative Learning Practicum III 1.0
PMD 715 2 of IPPE IIA-D 2.0
Total   17 + 2

Second Professional Year – Spring Semester

Course # Title Credit
PMD 702 Medical Microbiology and Immunology 3.0
PMD 704 Pharmacotherapeutics III - Neurologic, Psychiatric and Sensory Disorders and Anesthetics 4.0
PMD 706 Pharmacotherapeutics IV - Endocrinologic and Gynecologic Disorders 4.0
PMD 708 Biostatistics and Literature Evaluation 2.0
PMD 710 Pharmacy Management 2.0
PMD 712 Collaborative Learning Practicum IV 1.0
PMD 716 2 of IPPE IIA-D 2.0
Total   16 + 2

Third Professional Year – Fall Semester

Course # Title Credit
PMD 8XX Elective 3.0
PMD 803 Pharmacotherapeutics V - Gastrointestinal, Nutrition, and Skin, Bone and Joint Disorders 4.0
PMD 805 Pharmacotherapeutics VI - Infectious Diseases 4.0
PMD 801 U.S. and NYS Pharmacy Law 2.0
PMD 811 Collaborative Learning Practicum V 1.0
PMD 813 Seminar and Journal Club I 1.0
PMD 815 2 of IPPE IIIA-D 2.0
Total   15 + 2

Third Professional Year – Spring Semester

Course # Title Credit
PMD 8XX Elective 3.0
PMD 804 Pharmacotherapeutics VII - Pain Management, Substance Abuse, Toxicology and Special Populations 4.0
PMD 808 Pharmacotherapeutics VIII - Oncologic, Hematologic and Immunologic Disorders 4.0
PMD 810 Population Based Health Care 2.0
PMD 812 Collaborative Learning Practicum VI 1.0
PMD 814 Seminar and Journal Club II 1.0
PMD 816 2 of IPPE IIIA-D 2.0
Total   15 + 2

Fourth Professional Year – Summer, Fall, and Spring Semesters

Course # Title Credit
PMD 904
PMD 906
PMD 908
PMD 910
PMD 912
PMD 914
Advanced Practice will consist of 6 six-week rotations.
1. & 2. Elective Rotations*
3. Ambulatory Care Rotation
4. Advanced Institutional Pharmacy Practice
5. Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice
6. Acute Care
6.0 ea
Total   36.0

The curriculum is under the auspices of the Curriculum Committee of the School of Pharmacy and may be subject to change.

* Electives include, but not limited to, Long Term Care, Nuclear, Home Infusion,Geriatrics, Pediatrics, Managed Care, Oncology, and Psychiatry.

Biochemical Principles I (PMD 601)
This is the first half of a two semester course. Students learn about the structure/function relationships among the components responsible for the biochemical functions of life. The first semester topics include proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, bioenergetics, metabolism (catabolism and anabolism), lipids, membranes, nucleic acids, biotechnology, biochemical methods, vitamins and nutrition.

Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology I (PMD 603)
This is the first half of a two-semester course in which students learn about the structure and function of the body's organs. For this term, we'll focus on cellular physiology, autonomic nervous system physiology, cardiovascular and respiratory system physiology and pathophysiology. The goal of this course is to give students: 1) The Foundation needed to be competent and confident practitioners; 2) the ability to deal with complaints that patients present; 3) the desire to acquire knowledge to develop research programs.

Principles of Drug Action I (PMD 605)
Students acquire foundational knowledge in pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics, biopharmaceutics, and pharmacokinetics in this first of three courses. Students are introduced to drugs as molecules, (including the basic principles related to molecules), and the equilibrium and kinetic phenomena common to molecules. Students then learn about the molecular basis of drug selectivity and drug action, and the pharmacokinetic principles that impact drug action and the therapeutic dosing of drugs.

Profession of Pharmacy and Health Care Systems (PMD 607)
This course introduces students to the evolving US healthcare system. Students learn about the social, economic, and political environments in which healthcare is delivered, and the impact of these factors on the practice of pharmacy. By examining personal strengths and weaknesses, exploring career options, and thinking and writing reflectively, students will develop lifelong learning skills.

Professional Inquiry (PMD 609)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of professional inquiry, the process through which professionals create and utilize knowledge in practice. Students explore the philosophy of scientific and clinical reasoning and learn to utilize disciplined thinking to enhance their understanding of the science and practice of pharmacy.  Students investigate the sources of professional knowledge, strategies for accessing drug information and literature, and the use of quantitative and qualitative data to support decision making.

Collaborative Learning Practicum I (PMD 611)
This is the first in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I A, B (PMD 615)
This is the first of six introductory experiences. During each two-week experience, students work under the supervision of pharmacist preceptors in a community(A) or institutional(B) pharmacy setting. Students participate in active sophisticated shadowing of their preceptor, complete assignments designed to introduce them to important clinical, legal, administrative, and ethical issues affecting the practice of pharmacy, and reflect on their experiences. Students may also complete other assignments at the request of their preceptor.

Pharmacogenomics (PMD 602)
This course will introduce genetics and molecular and cellular biology, and will describe the nature of genetic materials and the universal genetic code. Students should be able to identify and describe molecular mechanisms such as replication, transcription and translation. The goal of this course is to enable students to understand how these disciplines can be used to explain the possible genetic basis for variability in drug response. Also, there will be discussion on the application of bioinformatics studies to pharmacogenomics and ethical issues in genomics. The pharmacogenetics of oxidative drug metabolism will be presented, as well as the potential applications to tailoring drug therapy. A discussion of drug transporters pharmacogenetics will include localization and function, variability and clinical consequences. The role of genetic variability in drug targets on drug efficacy and toxicity, and application to individualize drug therapy will be explored. Finally, current and future pharmacogenomics applications for several therapeutic areas such as oncology, hematology, infectious diseases such as HIV, TB etc. will be described.

Anatomy, Physiology and Pathophysiology II (PMD 604)
This is the second of two courses in which students learn about the structural and functional relationships of the human organism, emphasizing sensory receptors (taste, smell, vision, hearing and equilibrium), cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, and respiratory systems. As in PMD 603, students build a comprehensive theoretical foundation of the phenomena that alter human physiologic function throughout life. Students view additional classroom demonstrations in the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular, digestive, and respiratory systems.

Principles of Drug Action II (PMD 606)
In this second course of the three-course sequence, students continue to learn about the primary determinants of the disposition of drugs in the body (absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion) and the factors that impact drug disposition. Students also learn how to individualize patient dosing regimens. Students then learn how dosage forms and routes of delivery affect the disposition of drugs.

Health Communications, Diversity and Bioethics (PMD 610)
Students learn to apply the theoretical principles for communicating effectively with patients, families, and physicians, other health professionals, and provider groups. Students discuss the impact of race, sexual orientation, culture, religion, and physical ability on patients perceptions of the healthcare system and the delivery of services. Students also learn to recognize ethical dilemmas and resolve problems using basic ethical principles and an ethical decision-making process.

Collaborative Learning Practicum II (PMD 612)
This is the second in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Patient Assessment II Lab (PMD 614)
In this course, students will learn and practice the fundamentals of patient assessment, including physical examination, interviewing skills, and interpretation of laboratory test results. Students will also become familiar with common drug names, categories, dosing and therapeutic uses, as well as counseling skills based on the top medications. Classroom time will be a combination of large and small group work. Skill-based activities, such as the practicing of components of a physical examination, will be demonstrated in student pairs within designated small teams.

Patient Assessment I Lab (PMD 613)
In this practicum course, students will learn and practice the fundamentals of patient assessment, including physical examination, interviewing skills (such as history taking and symptom analysis) and interpretation of laboratory test results. Students will also become familiar with common drug names, categories, dosing and therapeutic uses. Classroom time will be a combination of large and small group work. Skill-based activities, such as the practicing of components of a physical examination, will be practiced in student pairs within designated small teams.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I A, B (PMD 616)
This is the second of six introductory experiences. During each two-week experience, students work under the supervision of pharmacist preceptors in a community(A) or institutional(B) pharmacy setting. Students participate in active sophisticated shadowing of their preceptor, complete assignments designed to introduce them to important clinical, legal, administrative, and ethical issues affecting the practice of pharmacy, and reflect on their experiences. Students may also complete other assignments at the request of their preceptor.

Principles of Drug Action III (PMD 701)
This is the final course of the three-course sequence. Students continue to learn how dosage forms and routes of delivery affect the disposition of drugs. Students also learn about recent advances in pharmaceutical dosage forms (such as protein pharmaceuticals) that are utilized in current and future pharmacy practice.

Pharmacotherapeutics I (PMD 703)
In the seven-course Pharmacotherapeutics sequence, students learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, drug disposition, and pharmacology in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes. In this first course, students learn the pharmacotherapy of renal and urologic disorders including acute and chronic kidney disease, hemo- and peritoneal dialysis, glomerulonephritis, disorders related to water and electrolyte homeostasis, erectile dysfunction, prostatic hyperplasia, and urinary incontinence.

Pharmacotherapeutics II (PMD 705)
Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Disorders – In this second course, students focus on the pharmacotherapy of cardiopulmonary disorders including hypertension, heart failure, ischemic heart disease, acute coronary syndromes, arrhythmias, cardiomyopathies, thromboembolism, hyperlipidemia, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, shock, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cystic fibrosis.

Self-Care (PMD 707)
Students learn about the role of the pharmacist in the management of self-limiting illnesses and self-care. Students learn appropriate triage and referral techniques and the advantages and disadvantages of a variety of non-prescription products and devices, as well as complementary and non-pharmacologic interventions utilized for self-care problems.

Pharmaceutical Calculations (PMD 709)
In this course, students practice the mathematical calculations required for compounding, dispensing, and administering medications including determination of the rate of administration of IV infusions, calculating drug concentrations and ratio strengths, as well as extent of ionization of drugs in solution. In laboratory sessions, students are provided opportunities to interpret prescription orders and prepare sterile and non-sterile dosage forms for dispensing.

Collaborative Learning Practicum III (PMD 711)
This is the third course in the six-term sequence. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II A, B (PMD 715)
This pharmacy practice experience is designed as a progression of the pharmacy practice experiences of the student s first professional year. During the first week of this two-week experience, students work under the supervision of pharmacist preceptors in a community pharmacy(A), assessing self-care problems and recommending lifestyle changes and non-prescription products to manage self-limiting problems. In the second week, students gain experience in a long-term care facility (nursing home, B) assessing drug-related problems in an elderly population. Students reflect on their experiences in both settings. Students may also complete other assignments at the request of their preceptor.

Medical Microbiology and Immunology (PMD 702)
Students learn the classification, morphology, and virulence of microorganisms and medical pathogens, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of infectious diseases, and the basic concepts of immunology. Students utilize their knowledge of immunology to understand the principles of antibiotic use, emphasizing the need to understand the site of infection, the susceptibility patterns for responsible organisms and the ability of the drug to reach the site of infection.

Pharmacotherapeutics III (PMD 704)
Neurologic, Psychiatric and Sensory Disorders and Anesthetics - In this third course of the sequence, students focus on the pharmacotherapy of the neurologic, psychiatric and sensory disorders including areas such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, Parkinson's Disease, pain management, Alzheimer's disease, Schizophrenia, depression, bipolar, anxiety, sleep disorders, glaucoma, and allergic rhinitis.

Pharmacotherapeutics IV (PMD 706)
Endocrinologic and Gynecologic Disorders – In this fourth course, students focus on the pharmacotherapy of endocrine and gynecologic disorders including diabetes mellitus, thyroid disorders, adrenal and pituitary gland disorders, pregnancy and lactation, contraception, endometriosis and hormone replacement therapy in women.

Biostatistics and Literature Evaluation (PMD 708)
In this course, students learn basic concepts of research methodology in order to develop, analyze, and present their own research projects and critically evaluate the validity and clinical relevance of published articles. Students learn to appropriately analyze various types of data using parametric and non-parametric statistics, probability and inferential statistics (e.g. analysis of variance and multiple regressions).

Pharmacy Management (PMD 710)
In this course students learn the common management principles employed in the practice of pharmacy. Students learn business methods ranging from personal management to operations management, managing people, accounting basics and finance. Students also learn about marketing, purchasing, value-added services, and obtaining reimbursement for providing cognitive service, as well as managing risks. Students are expected to apply concepts learned in class to prepare a business plan that provides the necessary blueprint for buying an existing independent community pharmacy or developing a new pharmacy.

Collaborative Learning Practicum IV (PMD 712)
This is the fourth in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II C,D (PMD 716)
This is the fourth of six introductory practice experiences. During this two-week experience students work under the supervision of pharmacist preceptors in a long-term care facility (C) to follow-up on their experience of the previous term, and continue to complete an additional one-week community pharmacy experience in managed-care(D). Students reflect on their experiences in both settings. Students may also complete other assignments at the request of their preceptor.

Elective (PMD 8XX)
The student may choose from a variety of electives such as, Toxicology, Consultant Pharmacy, and Alternative Medicines.

Pharmacotherapeutics V (PMD 803)
Gastrointestinal, Nutrition, and Skin, Bone and Joint Disorders – In this fifth course, students focus on the pharmacotherapy of the gastrointestinal, nutritional, and skin, bone and joint disorders including gastroesophageal reflux, peptic ulcer, inflammatory bowel, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, pancreatitis, viral hepatitis, obesity, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, gout, acne vulgaris, and psoriasis.

Pharmacotherapeutics VI (PMD 805)
Infectious Diseases – In this sixth course of the sequence students focus on the pharmacotherapy of infectious diseases of the respiratory tract, skin, and soft tissue, tuberculosis, parasitic diseases, urinary tract infections, sexually transmitted diseases, sepsis, fungal infections, and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Patient Assessment and Diagnostic Assessment (PMD 809)
In this course, students learn and practice the physical and diagnostic assessment skills necessary to optimize drug therapy. Students learn the elements of the history and physical examination, the fundamentals of laboratory medicine, and the interpretation of clinical data required to manage disease. Students are expected to apply what they have learned in practice laboratories and case study discussions.

Collaborative Learning Practicum V (PMD 811)
This is the fifth in a six-term sequence of courses. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Seminar and Journal Club I (PMD 813)
Students demonstrate effective communication and organizational skills by preparing, delivering, and evaluating professional seminars.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience III A-D (PMD 815)
Practice experiences in the third year are designed as a progression of the Intermediate experiences of the second year. In the fall semester of third-year, students are assigned to complete two one-week experiences. In order to prepare for the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences of the forth year, students have increasing levels of responsibility for patient care. Working under the supervision of a pharmacist preceptor, students assess drug-related problems in patients in an acute care setting (A), ambulatory care setting (B), work within an inter-professional team evaluating patient problems (C) or complete a service-learning project (D). Students reflect on their experiences in the assigned settings. Students may also complete other assignments at the request of their preceptor.

U.S. and NYS Pharmacy Law (PMD 801)
This course introduced students to the federal and New York State laws and regulations which govern the practice of pharmacy and regulate the manufacture and distribution of drug products and devices. Students learn the basic principles of tort law and professional malpractice. Students apply concepts learned in class to the analysis of case studies. Students review the historical events that have shaped today's professional pharmacy practice, and learn about the drug development and distribution system from a legal perspective.

Pharmacotherapeutics VII (PMD 804)
Pain Management, Substance Abuse, Toxicology and Special Populations - This course is the seventh of an eight-part series in which students will learn to integrate the principles of pathophysiology (12 hours), medicinal chemistry (5 hours), pharmacology (15 hours) and pharmacotherapy (22 hours) in order to optimize therapeutic outcomes and tolerability for patients. This course will focus on agents used in the management of: toxicological disorders, pain disorders, substance abuse, and disorders specific to pediatric and geriatric populations. This course will also include a discussion on topics related to medication safety.

Pharmacotherapeutics VII (PMD 808)
Oncologic, Hematologic and Immunologic Disorders – In this eighth course, students focus on the pharmacotherapy of oncologic, hematologic and immunologic disorders including breast, lung, ovarian, colorectal and prostate cancers, lymphomas, leukemias, melanoma, hematopoiesis, anemias, coagulation disorders, sickle cell anemia, Systemic Lupus Erythematosis, solid organ transplantation and allergic drug reactions.

Population Based Health Care (PMD 810)
Students learn how pharmacists contribute to the delivery of effective, quality health and disease prevention services. Students learn to apply population-specific data, quality assurance strategies, and processes to assure access to rational, safe and cost-effective drug therapy. Students also learn to utilize health-related quality of life measures and decision analyses to assess the health status of individuals in the US healthcare system, and make comparisons to individuals within other global systems. Utilizing the economic and epidemiologic principles learned in class, students critique peer-reviewed public health literature and develop a framework for a group research project that will be completed during the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience of the fourth professional year.

Collaborative Learning Practicum VI (PMD 812)
This is the final course in the six-term sequence. Students participate in team-based learning to foster a deeper understanding of course material, and develop necessary skills through case discussion and other active learning methods.

Seminar and Journal Club II (PMD 814)
Students demonstrate effective communication and organizational skills by preparing, delivering, and evaluating professional seminars.

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience III A-D (PMD 816)
Students are assigned to complete the two one-week experiences which they did not complete in the fall semester. Students have increasing levels of responsibility for patient care in preparation for the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences of the fourth professional year. Working under the supervision of a pharmacist preceptor, students assess drug-related problems in patients in an acute care setting (A), ambulatory care setting (B), work within an inter-professional team evaluating patient problems (C) or complete a service-learning project (D). Students reflect on their experiences in the assigned settings. Students may also complete other assignments at the request of their preceptor.

Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (PMD 904, 906, 908, 910, 912, and 914)
The advanced pharmacy practice experience provides practice opportunities that require students to assume responsibility for the outcomes of drug therapy. Students develop mastery of the educational outcomes during five required and two elective rotations. Required rotations include acute care, ambulatory care, advanced institutional pharmacy, advanced community pharmacy and a health and wellness project. Students also choose two elective rotations covering a variety of pharmacy settings such as, long term care, nuclear pharmacy, home infusion, geriatrics, pediatrics, managed care, oncology and psychiatric pharmacy.

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